Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Bring Physics to Life Through Pictures!

February 1st, 2022

Physics Central: Physics In Pictures

(www.physicscentral.com/explore/pictures/)

Grade: Around middle school & up; younger children may enjoy as well. Parental supervision required.

Want to get your physics on? This is the place! The American Physical Society sponsors this exciting website that demonstrates through multi-media technology, how things work and the importance of physics to everyone. You’ll find free information on the physics of light, sound, matter and more in the form of articles, animations, and videos.

The site is massive, so I’m featuring one of the most engaging sections for this review called “Physics In Pictures.” It provides virtual “illustrations of nature’s infinite variety and humankind’s ingenuity.”

Each picture and title entices you to want to know more. You can explore the science content by reading a brief explanation and then further your learning with links to stories on related current physics research. Your brain can take a quick dip in the physics waters or dive in and soak it all up.

When you get to the site, you’ll see some featured “Physics Pictures” that include. Click on any one to learn more. Then, if you look at the menu on the right side of the screen, you’ll see a list of “Physics in Pictures by Topic” that includes:

  • Chaos
  • Compression Waves & Sound
  • Electricity & Magnetism
  • Force & Motion
  • Light & Optics
  • Material Science
  • Quantum Mechanics
  • Space & the Universe
  • Thermodynamics & Heat

Click on a topic to explore more. When you’re through, use the menu at the top of the screen and click on “Experiment.” You’ll be rewarded with experiments to try at home along with other activities sponsored by this website.

Math Videos for Middle & High School

January 31st, 2022

Brightstorm: Math: Free Online Math Videos

(www.brightstorm.com/math/)

Grades 7 & up, with parental supervision

Brightstorm is a company that finds and films the best math teachers and creates engaging lessons around those teachers’ videos. The company sells test preparation programs, however, as an outreach to new customers, they offer over 2,000 FREE videos that teach math from Algebra through Calculus.

For example, as an Algebra student, you can watch a series of lessons on quadratic equations and functions. In each lesson, the concept is explained. Then, the student is presented with three more videos that present problems and explain solutions.

The lessons I watched were taught by a quirky and charming young woman instructor with a unique style and flair for teaching math. (Don’t miss her demonstration of setting “The Quadratic Formula” to the tune of Pop Goes The Weasel.)

When you get to the site, use the “Subject” menu to select the math topic of interest:

  • Algebra
  • Geometry
  • Algebra 2
  • Trigonometry
  • Precalculus
  • Calculus

Click on any one and a new window opens with a menu of topics in that category. Click on the topic of interest to access the lessons. When you click on a lesson, the first video in the series will launch, but you will be required to register (it’s free) to watch the entire video. Registered users can watch as many math videos as many times as they like.

As the website explains, “The power of a great teacher in action is undeniable.” Thanks to technology, students can learn math from some of the best teachers available – wherever and whenever they want.

U.S. & International Geography Game!

December 4th, 2021

Challenging & Fun Geography Game!

(www.globalschoolnet.org/geogame/index.cfm)

All grades, with parental supervision

Sponsored by Microsoft and affiliated with the Global SchoolNet Foundation, this website links children around the world through a myriad of FREE features and activities that you can explore when you get to the site

You must register to participate in the activities including the incredible Geo Game and GeoGame Project that helps kids learn geography terms, teaches them how to read and interpret maps, and increases their awareness of geographical and cultural diversity. It’s designed for middle to upper ELEMENTARY students, but students in all grade levels are encouraged to play.

When you get to the site click on the “Project Description” in the center of the screen. It will explain the GeoGame project and the GeoGame. Don’t skip this, as it will really make navigating the site MUCH EASIER. It provides teaching strategies and explains what materials you will need to play the game (i.e., U.S. map with time zones & latitudes, road maps, atlas, almanac, encyclopedia, etc.). This is especially helpful if you want to participate in the project — which is a little different than just playing the GeoGame.

Of course, you can just play the GeoGame without participating in the project. In that case, read through the directions for playing the game and then click on “Play the Game” on the menu at the top of the screen. (Don’t forget, you will have to register to play.) A new page opens with a selection of traditional GeoGames. Select a game category of interest and a new page opens listing the games in that category by I.D. number. Click on a specific game and a new page opens asking you to match the geography clues with the names of various cities and geographical locations. You will need the suggested materials (maps, etc.) to decipher the clues in order to match them to the city or location they describe. Allow at least 30 minutes or more to play the games — as research is a big part of the challenge in order to win!

This really is a remarkable use of technology and cooperative effort by students, teachers, parents, and educators to improve everyone’s knowledge of the world.

Creative & Interactive Periodic Table of Elements

November 30th, 2021

University of Nottingham:  BEST Periodic Table of Elements on the Net

The Periodic Table of Elements has become much easier to understand through the interactive capability of technology. Here is a recap of some of the BEST periodic tables I’ve reviewed for ClickSchooling over the past 15 years.  

Grade 4 & up approximately, with parental supervision

The Periodic Table of Videos

(www.periodicvideos.com/)

In my opinion, this is the most fun periodic table on the Net. When you click on an element on the periodic table, it plays a video showing scientists in the lab having fun demonstrating the properties of the elements. Developed by the University of Nottingham, each video is short (2-4 minutes) and provides basic information about the featured element, it’s history, and how it is used. The scientists’ antics with beakers, Bunsen burners, and bloopers are narrated by mild-mannered professor Martyn Poliakoff who has wonderful, wild, Einstein-ish hair!

WebElements

(www.webelements.com/index.html)

This is a click-and-learn table. Each element opens to its own page, maintained by the site that includes a description and photographs. This table has all kinds of hyperlinks within the descriptions to further explain the aspects of the element, along with an interesting sidebar that mentions the element’s uses and where it can be found.

The Photographic Periodic Table

(periodictable.com/)

Includes a photograph of every element on the periodic table, along with a description of the element. Some of them are beautiful – this is a visual treat!

Games: Chemical Elements & Their Symbols

(www.quia.com/custom/3main.html)

Provides free learning tools and games to help budding chemists memorize facts from the Period Table of Elements through:

  • Flash Cards
  • Match Game
  • Word Search
  • Concentration

The Periodic Table of Comic Books

(www.uky.edu/Projects/Chemcomics/index.html)

A couple of chemists took it upon themselves to collect comic strips that mention elements from the Periodic Table and compile them on this website.

Virtually Tour a Turkey Farm!

November 19th, 2021

Virtual Tours of Turkey Farms

All Grades, with parental supervision

Thanksgiving is right around the corner, and I thought it would be interesting to find out how turkeys are raised on farms. Here are two videos that offer tours of turkey farms:

Turkey Farm Tour

Watch a video (YouTube) of a large, technology-run family farm in Minnesota. The emphasis on this video is the dietary component of the food that is fed to the turkeys.

Free Range Turkey Farm

Watch a two-minute video (YouTube) of turkeys raised on a free-range family farm in British Columbia.

NOTE: Please remember that videos on YouTube allow unedited comments posted by visitors, along with randomly generated ads. Parents, as always, should preview the content and supervise all Internet use.

Teach History With These 100 Items!

November 4th, 2021

The British Museum: Teaching History with 100 Objects

(www.teachinghistory100.org/browse/keystage/all/date/all/from/3/theme/all/curriculum/all/)

Grades 1-9, with parental supervision

Using 100 objects from museums in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales and from the British Museum, this website strives to help teachers to teach “the new national history curriculum in England.” But nonresidents of England can reap the benefits of this website as well as it provides a wonderfully unique way to explore British history.

On the home page, there are several ways to begin exploring the objects. Items can be sorted and displayed by:

  • Key Stages – in the U.S. these are like grade levels (approximate equivalents are: KS1 = Grades 1-2, KS2 = Grades 3-6, KS3 = Grades 7-9)
  • History curriculum topic – Events, people, time periods
  • Date – specific time frames
  • Places – include Africa, Americas, Asia, Britain, Europe, Oceania
  • Theme – Beliefs and ideas, Conflict, Empires, Rules and rulers, Social and personal life, Technology and arts, and Trade and contact

You can use a combination of these search methods to narrow the selections down. Once you have input your desired search selections, images of all available objects meeting that criteria will populate on the page. Select the object image and the page will open. On the object page, there will be a larger image of the item, a brief description and much more information about the object including where it was from, what period, culture, what material it was made from, its dimensions and more. Use the right-hand sidebar menu to dig deeper by selecting:

  • About the object – more in-depth details about the item
  • A bigger picture – explanation of the objects purpose and similar items
  • Teaching ideas – ways to use the item to explore history
  • For the classroom – Download the image and related images and find links to activities.

All the items have downloadable PDFs of all the information and images for the objects.

Add this website to your “go-to” list for British history.

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