Posts Tagged ‘scientists’

Windows to Earth & Space Science

November 9th, 2021

Science: Windows To The Universe

(www.windows2universe.org/)

Grades 3 & up, approximately, with parental supervision

The National Earth Science Teachers Association sponsors this website that offers comprehensive, multi-media information to encourage learning Earth and Space science as well as a range of other related sciences for beginners, intermediate, and advanced students.

When you get to the website you’ll see a sliding panel featuring several of the science presentations in the archives. You can click on anyone to jump right in, or take some time to explore the menu and see what’s available including:

  • Sun – Explore the closest star to Earth including sunspots, solar flares, and coronal mass ejections.
  • Earth – Learn about our planet’s atmosphere and magnetic field, both of which are critical for sustaining life on Earth.
  • Solar System – Discover planets, dwarf planets, asteroids, comets, the heliosphere, and interstellar space.
  • Space – Study stars, galaxies, and other mysterious objects in our Universe.
  • Sciences – Learn how Earth and Space sciences are interconnected with geology, physics, chemistry, and biology.
  • Culture – Browse a collection of myths, folk tales, and stories about the Earth and sky. Check out artwork, poetry, books, and movies that portray the natural world.
  • People – Access biographies of scientists who made science history!
  • Games – Enjoy scientifically themed crosswords, jigsaw puzzles, word searches, and concentration. Play interactives about the carbon cycle, planets, space, and more! Enjoy coloring pages and paper activities
  • Space Weather – Learn about radiation, fluctuating magnetic fields, solar wind and the complex ways they interact with Earth’s magnetic field, including disruption of cell phone communication.
  • Multimedia – Get links to all sorts of pictures, animations, videos, podcasts, and interactive multimedia that are on the “Windows to the Universe” website.
  • Postcards – Read collections of virtual postcards from scientists doing field research around the world with sharks, penguins, ice, rocks, the atmosphere, and the ocean.
  • Citizen Science – Find out about science projects where the public can get involved in scientific research and data collection.

You’ll also find news, research information, and tips for teachers.

Note: This ad-supported site is free, however, you can purchase a membership to access the site ad-free, along with some other interactive features.

Discover this Archived Website Full of Science Videos!

September 5th, 2021

Vega Science Trust

(www.vega.org.uk/video/index.html)

Grades 6 and up, with parental supervision

This archived website offers free videos on science, technology, engineering and mathematics that provide a fundamental understanding of the principles of nature and the physical world.

When you get to the site you’ll see the video icon menu containing an archive of scientific videos which can all be viewed from this non-profit website. The videos cover a broad range of topics such as:

  • Interviews with Scientists – Including Nobel prize-winners in the fields of physics, medicine, chemistry, and more.
  • Careers in Science – Interviews with a biochemist, ecologist, entomologist, food scientist, cosmologist, computer engineer, quantum chemist, robotics engineer and more!
  • Issues of Concern – Scientists and politicians discuss their primary world concerns including climate change, malaria, etc.
  • Masterclass Science Videos – Scientists share their personal views on key concepts and achievements as well as their approach to the scientific method. Topics include bird flight, life in space, and states of matter.
  • The Next Big Thing – Scientists discuss antimatter, cloning, defying death, energy, artificial intelligence, safety of mobile phones, nanotechnology, and “The Theory of Everything!”
  • Educational Resources – A selection of short instructional films (for school or home study use) on wind power, electricity, transistors, nanotubes, bucky ball workshops, states of matter workshops (solids, liquids and gases) and more.

Scientists guided the development of the videos so that the content is presented in a natural and engaging way that is intellectually challenging.

Create Science Toys

June 8th, 2021

Science Toy Maker

(sciencetoymaker.org/)

Grade 1 and up, with parental supervision

This website provides complete step-by-step instructions on how to make your own science toys using easily accessible and cheap materials so that “nobody is excluded because of cost.”

When you get to the site, use the menu at the top to choose from:

  • Walkalong Gliders
  • Boomerang
  • Dragonfly Helicopters
  • All Projects
  • Extras

Under “All Projects”, you can choose between Quick and Easy, Intermediate, or Advanced. In the Quick and Easy section, you’ll see instructions for making science toys that young kids (elementary school age) can do. Make a propeller, a vortex, a top, an oscillating woodpecker, a parachute, a periscope, a robot finger and more! In the Advanced Section, Teens and adults can make science toys that include a water rocket launcher, a putt-putt boat, hot air balloon, helicopter, robot hands, and even a lie detector! Click on any one and a new page opens with instructions (some in streaming video), photos, illustrations, explanations, related activities and links for further research.

The projects are open-ended enough to encourage creative invention and tinkering. As the website explains, it is “a resource for inspired parents, kids, teachers, teenagers, homeschoolers, science fair participants and citizen scientists everywhere.”

Infrared Science

May 25th, 2021

Cool Cosmos

(coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/)

Grade K-9, with parental supervision

At this website, IPAC at Caltech has taken the science of infrared astronomy and made it accessible to students of all ages through a variety of free educational activities, web tutorials, lessons, videos, experiments, and resources that explain the infrared universe.

This site provides free classroom activities, lessons, tutorials, image galleries, games, and resources that can be used to satisfy the curiosity of anyone interested in learning about the universe.

When you get to the site, browse the featured categories of:

  • Infrared World – Find out the role of infrared light in Veterinary Science, Geology, Art, Firefighting, Search and Rescue, Environmental Monitoring, Archaeology, and more!
  • Infrared Universe – Discover how infrared light helps scientists explore the solar system, the Milky Way, and other galaxies. 
  • Infrared Missions – Indulge in infrared astronomy through an array of images from telescopes worldwide. You can also explore a gallery of infrared images and check out a timeline on infrared technology.
  • Ask an Astronomer - Text and video answers to questions such as:
  • Why is the sky blue?
  • What will happen to the Earth when the Sun dies?
  • How do you discover an asteroid?
  • What is the nearest galaxy to the Milky Way?
  • Why isn’t Pluto a planet any more?
  • What is a brown dwarf?
  • What causes an eclipse of the moon?
  • Galleries – Check out amazing infrared images of the world and the universe

Use the menu at the top of the page and click on the “Teachers” link to find:

  • Infrared Lesson Plans
  • Infrared Posters & Printouts
  • NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)
  • Other Astronomy Imagery, Lesson Plans, and Resources

Through this website, you’ll discover that “to study the cool cosmos, infrared light is our window into the heat of the coolest things around.”

The Annual Great Backyard Bird Count is Coming

February 2nd, 2021

The Great Backyard Bird Count

(www.birdcount.org/)

All grades, with parental supervision

 

Mark your calendars and get ready to participate in “The Great Backyard Bird Count” scheduled for February 12-15, 2021.

This annual event, sponsored by the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, is your opportunity to join a citizen-science project (for kids, teens, and adults) that helps scientists collect data and investigate far-reaching questions about bird populations. It only takes as little as 15 minutes on one day. You simply count the birds you see in your backyard and turn in the results. It’s free, fun, and easy – and it helps the scientists to help the birds.

To learn how to participate go to The Great Backyard Bird Count website. Use the menu to register, learn about birds, and view the bird photo gallery.

Learn the 60+ Symbols of Astronomy & Physics

January 26th, 2021

Sixty Symbols

(www.sixtysymbols.com/index.html

Grades 1-12, with parental supervision

This fantastic website offers free videos about physics and astronomy featuring experts from The University of Nottingham, who explain the strange letters and squiggles (many more than 60 of them) used by scientists.

As explained on the website, “Sixty Symbols is a collection of videos by experts from The University of Nottingham. It’s worth noting many symbols have multiple uses across scientific disciplines and we sometimes tackle them from an unexpected viewpoint.”

Here’s some of what you’ll see: 

  • Click on “E” for energy and see an Einstein doll on a swing as a demonstration of potential and kinetic energy.
  • Click on the symbol for the planet Venus (looks like a hand mirror) and learn all about it. You’ll also learn the history of the symbol and its use as the universal symbol for women.
  • What has a symbol of a cat got to do with physics? Visit the site, click on the cat and find out!

When you get to the site you’ll see the table of Sixty Symbols (and then some). Click on one and a new page opens where a video launches that explains it. They are wonderfully engaging and educating.

css.php