Posts Tagged ‘scientists’

The Great Backyard Bird Count

February 11th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, February 11, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Backyard Bird Count

(www.audubon.org/content/about-great-backyard-bird-count)

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

Mark your calendars and get ready to participate in “The Great Backyard Bird Count” scheduled for February 14-17, 2020.

This annual event, sponsored by the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, is your opportunity to join a citizen-science project (for kids, teens, and adults) that helps scientists collect data and investigate far-reaching questions about bird populations.

It only takes as little as 15 minutes on one day. You simply count the birds you see in your backyard and turn in the results. It’s free, fun, and easy – and it helps the scientists to help the birds.

To learn how to participate go to The Great Backyard Birdcount website. Use the menu to register, learn about birds, and view the bird photo gallery.

Now, if this sparks your family’s interest in birds, you are sure to enjoy this website: WhatBird.com. Use a tool that helps you to identify a bird by what it looks like. You simply enter its attributes such as habitat, size, color, body shape, bill shape, etc., to drill down results, choosing as many options as you can along the way.

The 60+ Symbols of Astronomy & Physics

January 28th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, January 28, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Sixty Symbols

(www.sixtysymbols.com/index.html)

Age Range: 6-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

This fantastic website offers FREE videos about physics and astronomy featuring experts from The University of Nottingham, who explain the strange letters and squiggles (many more than 60 of them) used by scientists.

As explained at the website, “Sixty Symbols is a collection of videos by experts from The University of Nottingham. It’s worth noting many symbols have multiple uses across scientific disciplines and we sometimes tackle them from an unexpected viewpoint.” Here’s some of what you’ll see: 

  • Click on “E” for energy and see an Einstein doll on a swing as a demonstration of potential and kinetic energy.
  • Click on the symbol for the planet Venus (looks like a hand mirror) and learn all about it. You’ll also learn the history of the symbol and its use as the universal symbol for women.
  • What has a symbol of a cat got to do with physics? Visit the site, click on the cat and find out!

When you get to the site you’ll see the table of Sixty Symbols (and then some). Click on any one and a new page opens where a video launches that explains it. They are wonderfully engaging and educating.

Winter Solstice Science

December 17th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, December 17, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

SciJinks: What’s a Solstice

(scijinks.gov/solstice/)

Age Range: 8-13 (Grades 3-8, with parental supervision)

 

The Winter Solstice will soon be here (for those in the Northern Hemisphere of planet Earth). It marks the shortest day and the longest night of the year. The winter solstice is celebrated by various cultures and religions worldwide. But what exactly is a solstice?

At this NASA-sponsored website, scientists provide an easy-to-understand explanation of the solstice complete with illustrations and photographs. This presentation includes information about: 

  • The Equator
  • Earth’s Axis of Rotation
  • Arctic Circle
  • Tropic of Cancer
  • Tropic of Capricorn
  • Antarctic Circle
  • Spring and Autumnal Equinox

When you’re through exploring the solstice page, use the menu to access mini-lessons and games that teach about: 

  • Weather
  • Hurricanes and Storms
  • Clouds, Water, and Ice
  • Tides and Oceans
  • Atmosphere
  • Seasons

And more!

Fun Periodic Table of Videos

October 15th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, October 15, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Periodic Videos

(www.periodicvideos.com/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

What a find! This website teaches the periodic table with videos!

When you click on an element on the periodic table, it plays a video showing educational experiments and explanations about that element. (Okay, while this site is probably designed for middle school, high school, and beyond, younger children will enjoy seeing some of the experiments. Plus, we’ve found that little kids lap up information about the Periodic Table, so don’t be shy about introducing them to it.)

This is so much fun! Each video is short (up to about 10 minutes) and provides basic information about the featured element, it’s history, and how it is used. You can tell the chemists, who narrate while demonstrating experiments with the various elements, love what they do!

Consider starting with Lithium (Li). It’s very reactive in water and the clip is fun to watch. Then try Hydrogen (H) or Helium (He) to see a big bang! (Careful – kids may be tempted to try this at home, so parental guidance and safety discussions are required.) The Phosphorus (P) video will really amaze your kids when they learn there’s about a pound of this reactive element in their bodies!

The scientists in the lab have a lot fun demonstrating the properties of the elements – and their antics with beakers, Bunsen burners, and bloopers are narrated by mild-mannered professor Martyn Poliakoff who has wonderful, wild, Einstein-ish hair! Some of his descriptions are hilarious – such as when he describes what can be done with Nitrogen (N). (Preview it, as it might alarm younger children.)

Note: We didn’t watch all of the videos. Therefore, parents AS ALWAYS should preview the videos BEFORE showing them to children to determine suitability of content.

The Periodic Table of Videos is educational, fun, and not to be missed!

Free Environmental Science Journals

August 27th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, August 27, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Natural Inquirer

(www.naturalinquirer.org/)

Age Range: 4-18 (Grades PreK-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers a FREE science education journal titled, “The Natural Inquirer,” in which scientists with the USDA Forest Service share their research with students of all ages.

When you get to the site, you’ll see a featured issue that you can click on and download the PDF. To see the issues by grade, scroll over “Order Products” in the top menu to choose from: 

  • Middle & High School
  • Upper Elementary
  • PreK – 2nd Grade

You can then download the issue of choice. 

Each issue of “The Natural Inquirer” for Middle & High School students introduces students to the scientists who conduct the environmental research and includes an article on a specific research project. Each issue also contains a “FACTivity” designed to help students learn scientific vocabulary words included in the articles. There are also discussion questions designed to help students think more about research. For the elementary grades, the issues are called Investi-gator and the PreK-2nd grade issues are called the National Inquirer Reader Series. Some issues are also offered in Spanish!

Be sure to check out the series of Scientist Cards and Posters – these cards are an excellent tool for teaching students about different types of science and scientists and can be printed and used offline. There are also accompanying lesson plans and supplemental resources under “For Educators” in the left side bar. And there are some games and activities and more under “For Kids” in the top menu.


This is a treasure trove of environmental learning resources! Bookmark this one, as you’ll need to visit many times to explore the vast content!

Serious Science Projects for K-12

May 28th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, May 28, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Science Buddies

(www.sciencebuddies.org/)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

This non-profit foundation’s website provides free science project ideas, instructions, explanations, and assistance “for serious students” to build their literacy in science and technology in the 21st century.

You’ll find free projects and activities in all areas of science including: 

  • Physical Science
  • Life Science
  • Earth & Environmental Science
  • Math & Computer Science
  • Engineering
  • Behavioral & Social Sciences

You’ll even find science projects that cover cooking, food, music, photography, videos, computer games, and sports.

Science Buddies aims to reduce the hassle of hands-on scientific investigations while encouraging fun, intellectually-stimulating and cutting-edge science education. When you get to the site you’ll see a menu that includes: 

  • Science Projects – Over 1,200 scientist-outlined projects in 30 different fields of science and engineering. Plus you can use the “Topic Selection Wizard” to find a project that matches your student’s unique interests!
  • Project Guides – Not sure how to proceed? This section includes step-by-step guidance about the scientific method, research, constructing and testing a hypothesis, analyzing data, drawing a conclusion, and communicating results.
  • Ask an Expert – Get online advice in a forum with scientists and engineers.
  • Science Careers – Discover how the science in a student’s project is used in real-world careers.
  • Teachers/Parents/Students – Find resources, enrichment tools, and tips for success.

This is an amazing resource for science discovery and exploration. Bookmark it to return often.

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