Posts Tagged ‘science’

Why Do I Have To Learn Math?

October 26th, 2020

 

It’s Monday, October 26, 2020, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Motivate – Maths Enrichment for Schools

(motivate.maths.org/content/)

Age Range: 11-17 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This archived site from the University of Cambridge presents downloadable multimedia explorations of how math relates to real life issues such as nutrition, disease, vaccinations, and the economics of health. The math topics covered include percentages, graphs, probability, equations, contingency tables, tree diagrams and much more!

When you get to the site you’ll see a description of what’s provided on the site. Click on the links under the title “Multi-Media Packs” to get to the engaging math activities that answer questions such as: 

  • Is eating bacon sandwiches bad for you (or are the statistics misleading)?
  • How do mathematical models make predictions about epidemics?
  • What are the odds that you test positive for something and the test is wrong?

Explore these and other health-related questions from a mathematical perspective.

You can also do an in-depth study of “Babylonian Maths” that hone skills in number and place value, multiplication, division, inverses, shape, and symmetry.

If you still want more, click over to the “Cross-Curricular Resources” section to find correlations between mathematics and art, geography, history, music, science, sports and more. Some of the videos (VCs) in this section don’t work any more, but there are plenty of good suggested activities to stimulate learning over a wide variety of subjects.

97 Orchard Street National Historical Site

October 22nd, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, October 22, 2020, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Tenement Museum

(www.tenement.org/explore/behind-the-scene/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

This website CHANGE THIS some terrific science lessons, activities and tools. It will also inspire scientific curiosity – not only for kids, but even for parents who aren’t keen in science.

When arriving at the site, scroll down to read about the “people, objects, and traditions that shaped the fabric of everyday life in New York City tenements.” Some of the articles include: 

  • Why 97 Orchard Street?
  • History by Numbers
  • Fanny Rogarshevsky’s Toolbox
  • Rosaria Baldizzi: A Complicated Path to Citizenship
  • Precision and Spirit: Fighting for a Place in America
  • And more

When you are done exploring, select the “Learn” tab from the top menu to find lesson plans, teacher resources, and more.

When you have finished visiting this website, hop on over to New York’s PBS station Thirteen Lower East Side Tenement Museum website for more insight into what the tenement on 97 Orchard Street might have looked like in 1870 and 1915 as well as learn some interesting history about some of the tenants. When arriving at the link, select from the following: 

  • Urban Log Cabin – Using the images of the tenement from 1870 or 1915, select a room to view what the apartment looked like during the time period and learn a little bit about the folks that lived there.
  • Excavation – 97 Orchard Street was boarded up from 1935-1987. Learn what was found when it was opened again. Examine the 13 layers of wallpaper found on one wall and check out 10 objects found during renovation.
  • Tenement VR – Take virtual tours of the Gumpertz Apartment (1870’s) and the Baldizzi Apartment (1935) as they might have appeared when the families were living in them. Don’t forget to learn about the families by clicking on the text links.
  • History – Read a brief history of the tenement and tenement life as well as the changes required through time. Click on the images at the top to see actual pictures of tenement life in the 30’s and 40’s.

These websites provide an excellent opportunity to learn about immigration and tenement life in New York’s Lower East Side.

Help kids make healthier lifestyle choices

October 20th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, October 20, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

BAM! (Body and Mind)

(www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/bam/teachers.htm)

Age Range: 9-14 (Grades 4-8, with parental supervision)

 

Here’s a website that can help kids make healthier lifestyle choices. The units included are: 

  • CDC Basics
  • Nutrition
  • Physical Education and Activity
  • Health Conditions and Diseases
  • Disabilities and Birth Defects
  • Child Development
  • Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion
  • E-cigarettes and Alcohol

Then scroll down to the “Ask a Scientist” comic book series: 

  • How Does My Body Fight Disease?
  • How Do People Become Infected with Germs?
  • How Loud is Too Loud?

Also check out the link to Health Literacy Skills at the bottom.

Free, Fun, “Parts of Speech” Tutorial & More!

October 14th, 2020

 

It’s Wednesday, October 14, 2020, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Parts of Speech Tutorial

(www.sheppardsoftware.com/grammar/grammar_tutorial.htm)

Age Range: 7-10 (Grades 2-6, with parental supervision)

 

This fun “Parts of Speech Tutorial” is comprised of a series of animated games that help kids identify and use nouns, adjectives, verbs, commas, and capitals. It’s part of the massive, ad-supported Sheppard Software website that offers hundreds of free learning games for children in language arts, math, science, history and more.

When you get to the website you’ll see a picture of a stage. Click on the word “Play” on the stage curtain to create a character using nouns, adjectives, and verbs. If you’re uncertain of those parts of speech, then look at the menu on the left side of the page to find educational games that include:

  • Noun Explorer – Learn the definition of a noun and use it to feed fish in the animated game.
  • Adjective Adventure – Select fly adjectives and use them to feed the spiders.
  • Verbs in Space – Use verbs to hammer robot aliens in space.
  • Magical Capital – Help a fairy capitalize words in sentences.
  • Comma Chameleon – Select punctuation marks and help the chameleon place them in a sentence correctly.

Once you play those games, go back to the main page to build your character for the stage. This is an engaging way to help kids learn and practice parts of speech.
 
When you’ re finished, be sure to click on the words “Sheppard Software” at the top of the screen to explore all of the learning games offered at this site. You’ll want to bookmark it to return often.

Free “File Folder” Science Games

October 13th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, October 13, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

File Folder Fun – Science

(filefolderfun.com/SearchAge)

Age Range: 3-7 (Grades PreK-2, with parental supervision)

 

This site offers free, printable file folder games and activities that help young children learn about topics in science.

When you get to the site, scroll down to the grade you are interested in and click on the link for the science related activities. Or to make it easier, we have listed the links below: 

Read the explanation and/or instructions, then download the game/activity you are interested in. There are also skill building links and supplementary resources.

The activities at this site are for younger children, but older children may enjoy preparing them for their siblings.

(While there are a variety of free file folder activities at this commercial site, there are many more available for sale.)

When you are through exploring the science activities, check out the language arts, social studies, and math activities for grades PreK-3. There is so much at this site, so bookmark it to return often!

Virtual Tour of Latex Balloon Factory

October 9th, 2020

 

It’s Friday, October 9, 2020, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Balloon Headquarters

(www.balloonhq.com/faq/making.html)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Ever wonder how latex and Mylar balloons are made? You can find out by taking a virtual field trip to this site.

When you get there scroll down a little and you can read a general overview and some Q&A’s about how balloons are manufactured. There are some photographs that help illustrate the text. You will discover how balloons are molded, how the rolled lip is formed, how they are colored and imprinted, and there is even information on how to make latex balloons at home! (Parental supervision is required!)

But don’t stop with the tour. This site has all kinds of fascinating and educational information about balloons (some more appropriate for high school level and beyond). When you finish the “tour” click on “The Guide” on the menu at the top of the screen. Look under the headline: The How’s and Why’s of Balloons. You will see a menu that offers: 

  • How balloons are made – click on it to repeat the tour.
  • How helium-filled balloons float – includes a discussion of “Archimedes’ Principle.”
  • How balloons pop – an in-depth discussion of the effects of static electricity on balloons, an engineer’s explanation of stress on balloons, the molecule arrangement of balloons, and much more.
  • Balloon Science 101 – includes science discussion about balloons from the simple to the highly technical (for example: Stupid Human Tricks with balloons to Entropy and the 2nd law of thermodynamics as applied to latex).
  • Balloons and Teaching – A complete 6-week sample curriculum that covers balloon safety, twisting balloons, connecting balloons, making balloon sculptures, hats, and critters – and some interesting suggestions/experiments with balloons and dry ice.

You can also read all about the history of balloons and much more! This is a delightful site for the balloon aficionado in your family. 


We also found a YouTube video of how balloons are made. Be sure to have a gross of balloons handy – the urge to inflate and pop will be overwhelming!

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