Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Explore Digital Photography Techniques!

June 11th, 2022

It’s Saturday, June 11, 2022, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

Digital Photography School

(digital-photography-school.com/)

Grades 5-12, with parental supervision

This ad-supported website created by Darren Rowse provides a bonanza of digital photography tutorials and helpful hints to make the most of your digital camera.

When you get to the site, click on “Start Here” on the upper menu. On this page, students can learn photography tips and techniques relating to:

  • Landscapes
  • Portraits
  • Composition
  • Beginner Tips
  • Post Processing
  • Cameras and Gear

Parents will want to check out the entry called “13 Lessons to Teach Your Child About Digital Photography” to help their children learn some basics of taking a photograph. (Put the title in the “search” box to get right to it.)

There are courses that can be purchased from this website, but visitors will find a lot of great free information about photography that they could easily create their own short course for their student. You can also subscribe to their weekly newsletter.

Amazing Oceanic & Atmospheric Photos!

May 31st, 2022

It’s Tuesday, May 31, 2022, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

NOAA Photo Library

(www.photolib.noaa.gov/)

All grades, with parental supervision

Incredible photographs! The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association offers this amazing collection of artistic and educational photographs that you won’t want to miss.

When you get to the site, click on the word “collections” near the top of the page. You will see that NOAA has divided their photo library into albums and catalogs based on topic. As you browse through the menu, you will see collections that include:

  • Flying with NOAA – fly with pilots through the clouds
  • NOAA’s Ark – all kinds of animal photos
  • Sanctuaries – marine sanctuary images
  • Voyage to Inner Space – undersea research
  • National Severe Storms Laboratory – including hail, lightning, and tornadoes
  • And much, much more!

Click on any category and a new page opens containing a short introduction. You can click on any thumbnail for a larger picture.

While this site stands on its own as a representation of artistic expression through photography, be prepared for it to pique your family’s interest in any given topic. It’s a great way to introduce a subject you may want to study – or to enhance your current studies. It’s also just a visually pleasing experience to look through these amazing photo albums.

Art Lessons for All Levels

February 12th, 2022

Haringkids.com: Keith Haring Art Lessons for Kids

(www.haringkids.com/lesson_plans/)

All grades, with parental supervision

This website, sponsored by the Keith Haring Foundation, is a tribute to the artist Keith Haring, whose bold, vibrant work appeals to kids of all ages. Haring loved children, and through this website the foundation continues to inspire and encourage the artist in everyone.

The site contains a wide array of Haring-inspired, free art lesson plans using different art mediums including crayons, paint, clay, photography, and much more. The lessons were submitted by teachers and students worldwide.

When you get to the site you’ll see an introduction to the lesson plans. Use the horizontal menu (in black) at the top of the page to search by age/grade range that includes:

  • Early Childhood – One of the lessons is called “Colorful Dogs” and teaches students how to identify basic shapes and colors while assembling paper dogs.

  • Elementary 1 – Use these lessons to make holiday ornaments or paint a mural.

  • Elementary 2 – Learn to use oil pastels while creating spontaneous art similar to the subway paintings done by Keith Haring in New York.

  • Elementary 3 – Try your hand at “Drawing with Wire” and discover how to use mixed media such as wire, paper, and markers to create silhouette drawings.

  • Middle School – Haring’s artwork contains social commentary. One of his most famous murals was called “Crack is Wack.” This section contains an explanation of the meaning of it, and instructions for creating a Haring-inspired mural. You’ll find other lessons as well.

  • Above 14 – This section for older students also explores the messages in Haring’s work while providing lesson ideas for learning how to make clay portraits, animations, and mobiles.

I’ve focused on the HaringKids Lesson Plans for this review. There are many more interesting things to explore at the website. Parents, as always, should preview the content to determine suitability for their own children.

Trick Photography Explained

September 5th, 2020

 

It’s Saturday, September 5, 2020, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The American Museum of Photography – Photographic Fictions

(www.photographymuseum.com/photographicfictions.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Explore the history of trick photography with this website from The American Museum of Photography. The museum offers an exhibit called “Photographic Fictions: How The Camera Learned To Lie” that documents the history of how photographers used the camera to create pictures that tampered with reality. This online exhibit is really a companion to a book by the same title.

The exhibit is set up like a book – you simply click your way through the chapter pages to see great pictures and read text that illustrates the progress of trick photography from altered daguerreotypes to composite photographs designed to fool the eye. When you get to the site you will see a menu that includes: 

  • Introduction: Tampering With Perfection – Find out how early photographers used embellishment to improve upon reality.
  • Montages, Multiples & Mischief – Discover the secrets of double exposures and the art of creating photomontages.
  • Do You Believe? Spirit Photography, 1868-1935 – In early photography a person who moved out of camera range after only a portion of the exposure was completed would appear as a see-through blur or a “ghost.” One photographer claimed he had taken actual photographs of ghosts, starting a fad of spirit photography and a scientific controversy that lasted well into the 20th century. See the images and read the story in this section.
  • Seeing Double: Creating Clones With a Camera – In the 1860s, photographers developed techniques to duplicate people – causing them to appear twice in the same photograph. These double-exposure novelties were popular for more than three decades.
  • Faux Snow: Climate Change In the Studio – See how photographers created winter climate conditions in their studios.
  • “Did You Ever Have a Dream Like This?” – Check out the home-grown surrealism of trick photographer “Dad” Martin.

This online exhibit provides a really fascinating peak at the development of an art form of illusion. It makes one question the belief that “the camera doesn’t lie.”

Note: Today’s featured website houses other exhibits by the American Museum of Photography as well. We have not previewed the other exhibits, so our suggestion (as always) is for parents to review the content for suitability before sharing it with your children.

Incredible photos of aviation, weather, marine life, space, animals and more!!

August 4th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, August 4, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

NOAA Photo Library

(www.photolib.noaa.gov/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Incredible photographs! The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association offers this amazing collection of artistic and educational photographs that you won’t want to miss.

When you get to the site, click on the word “collections” near the top of the page. You will see that NOAA has divided their photo library into albums and catalogs based on topic. As you browse through the menu, you will see collections that include: 

  • Flying with NOAA – fly with pilots through the clouds
  • NOAA’s Ark – all kinds of animal photos
  • Sanctuaries – marine sanctuary images
  • Voyage to Inner Space – undersea research
  • National Severe Storms Labratory – including hail, lightning, and tornadoes
  • And much, much more!

Click on any category and a new page opens containing a short introduction. You can click on any thumbnail for a larger picture.

While this site stands on its own as a representation of artistic expression through photography, be prepared for it to pique your family’s interest in any given topic. It’s a great way to introduce a subject you may want to study – or to enhance your current studies. It’s also just a visually pleasing experience to look through these amazing photo albums.

Serious Science Projects for K-12

May 28th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, May 28, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Science Buddies

(www.sciencebuddies.org/)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

This non-profit foundation’s website provides free science project ideas, instructions, explanations, and assistance “for serious students” to build their literacy in science and technology in the 21st century.

You’ll find free projects and activities in all areas of science including: 

  • Physical Science
  • Life Science
  • Earth & Environmental Science
  • Math & Computer Science
  • Engineering
  • Behavioral & Social Sciences

You’ll even find science projects that cover cooking, food, music, photography, videos, computer games, and sports.

Science Buddies aims to reduce the hassle of hands-on scientific investigations while encouraging fun, intellectually-stimulating and cutting-edge science education. When you get to the site you’ll see a menu that includes: 

  • Science Projects – Over 1,200 scientist-outlined projects in 30 different fields of science and engineering. Plus you can use the “Topic Selection Wizard” to find a project that matches your student’s unique interests!
  • Project Guides – Not sure how to proceed? This section includes step-by-step guidance about the scientific method, research, constructing and testing a hypothesis, analyzing data, drawing a conclusion, and communicating results.
  • Ask an Expert – Get online advice in a forum with scientists and engineers.
  • Science Careers – Discover how the science in a student’s project is used in real-world careers.
  • Teachers/Parents/Students – Find resources, enrichment tools, and tips for success.

This is an amazing resource for science discovery and exploration. Bookmark it to return often.

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