Posts Tagged ‘Native Americans’

Native American Math Activities

November 12th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, November 12, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Play Picaria

(thelittletravelers.typepad.com/the_little_travelers/2009/01/picaria.html)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

It’s November and in the U.S. learning activities are often themed around the contributions of Native Americans to American history. Here are some math activities inspired by the same.

Play Picaria – A homeschooling family offers step-by-step instructions for how to make your own game board and play Picaria, a fun strategy game developed by the Zuni or Pueblo Indians of the American Southwest. It is similar to tic-tac-toe, but more challenging. Don’t miss the terrific tips and videos on worldwide traveling and learning with kids at this website, too!

Check out this site as well: Native American Geometry

Age Range: 9-14. This website was designed for students in grades 4-9 and teaches geometry through hands-on investigations and design activities. It has been used successfully in GATE (Gifted And Talented Education) programs as well.

Native American Science Lessons & Activities

November 6th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, November 6, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Native American Science

(nativeamericanscience.org/)

Age Range: 14-18 (Grades 9 and up; children with parental supervision)

 

It’s November and in the U.S. learning activities are often themed around the contributions of Native Americans to American history.

This website, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and several universities, provides a free university-level curriculum (that high school students and accelerated learners may also enjoy) that shows how Indigenous traditions are based on a solid understanding and description of natural phenomena. Topics include: 

  • Native and Western Views of Nature
  • Indigenous Research Methods
  • Environmental Justice
  • Indigenous Perspective
  • and more.

As explained at the website, “Our goal is to avoid romantic cliches and characterizations of Indian people and their traditional knowledge and to present this knowledge as well documented but different in approach from ‘Western science.’ These traditions are based on connection to the natural world, rather than separation from nature–in other words we are working with a science based on relationships, reciprocity and respect rather than solely on exploitation and economic concerns.”

And for the younger set, have them build their own canoe: Lesson: Can-Do Canoe

This free classroom lesson and activity (for ages 8-18 or grades 3-12) can be tweaked for homeschoolers. As explained at the website, “Explore the engineering design process by building model canoes from everyday materials and testing their design. The canoes must be able to float for three minutes and, for older students, support a load.” Students then evaluate the effectiveness of their canoes and discuss their findings.

New Mexico History and More

January 4th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, January 4, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

New Mexico Secretary of State – Kids Corner

(www.sos.state.nm.us/Kids_Corner/default.aspx)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

New Mexico entered the Union on January 6, 1912. Explore its history, geography and more with this portion of the New Mexico Secretary of State website.

Using the left-hand sidebar menu, choose from the following topics: 

  • Native Americans – Learn about the people who lived in the region before the first Spaniards settled there.
  • Hispanic Culture – Discover the influence of Spanish culture and Spanish founding families of New Mexico.
  • New Mexico Government – Find out more about the current governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, and their duties.
  • State Symbols – Explore the state symbols including a few not so common ones such as state aircraft, state guitar, and state bolo tie.
  • Geography – See maps of the state with links to other websites.
  • Coloring Book – Download the PDF activity book with pictures to color and a matching activity.
  • State Songs – Examine information and download PDF sheet music of the various state songs.
  • Other Links – sites to learn about the presidency.
  • Past NM Secretaries of State – Learn about the first New Mexico Secretary of State and subsequent secretaries.

Informative text and images make this website a good addition to your state study collection.

Maple Syrup Day Resources

December 15th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, December 15, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Maple Syrup Day Resources

(See below.)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

National Maple Syrup Day is December 17! We thought it would be fun to learn about maple syrup.

Read The Legend of Maple Syrup

(sugarmakerstimes.blogspot.com/2007/10/native-americans-and-legend-of-maple.html)


North America is the only place where maple syrup is produced. It was originally made by Native Americans. At this website you can read “The Legend of Maple Syrup” online.

Watch Videos on How Maple Syrup is Made
Part I (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVXeBOl4fXY)

Part II (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tidds7_gDM)


These videos were lovingly made by a family who has been in the maple syrup business for years. Gather your family around the computer, turn on the speakers to hear the music and narration, and enjoy a delightful virtual field trip to a maple sugar tree farm.

Maple Math (hubpages.com/education/maple-math)

A terrific presentation of a math lesson to discover line symmetry in maple leaves.

Maple Syrup Coloring Page

(homeschooling.about.com/od/freeprintables/ss/maplesyrupprint.htm#step7)


Print and color a picture of tapping the maple trees.

These websites are sure to whet your appetite for maple syrup. Have a Maple Syrup Taste Test! Purchase some real maple syrup and compare it to pancake syrup that is typically made from corn syrup and artificial maple flavor. Which do you like best?

[ClickSchooling] Mr. Nussbaum – United States History for Kids

April 14th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, April 14, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Mr. Nussbaum – United States History for Kids

(http://mrnussbaum.com/united-states-history-for-kids/)

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

This portion of the larger, ad-supported Mr. Nussbaum website created by the teacher of the same name, focuses on United States History. With hundreds of topics, interactives, and printables, your elementary and middle school students will find themselves digging deeper into the subject at hand.

When arriving at today’s link, select your main topic of interest from the some of the following: 

  • United States History Super Timeline
  • Explorers
  • 13 Colonies
  • American Revolution
  • Civil War
  • Lewis and Clark
  • Westward Expansion
  • Biographies
  • French and Indian War
  • Native Americans
  • Pirates
  • Presidents
  • Constitution
  • United States Government
  • War of 1812
  • Manifest Destiny
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Castles
  • Animated Biographies
  • Social Studies Games

Each main topic is further broken down into sub-topics to narrow your learning adventure. Not only is there concise, age-appropriate text, but there are interactive maps, games, quizzes, puzzles, downloadable worksheets and other activities. 

In addition to the history pages, visitors will want to explore the math, language arts, science, and other pages available. There is also an option to purchase a subscription to an ad-free version of the website if you so desire.

Bookmark this one to come back to often.

Learn the History of the Raid on Deerfield

April 7th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, April 7, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Raid On Deerfield: The Many Stories of 1704

(1704.deerfield.history.museum/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

Count us among the ignorant who had never learned about the Raid on Deerfield of 1704. That’s astonishing when you consider how this singular event impacted American history.

At today’s website, you will find a well thought-out and exceptional use of multi-media technology that presents the history leading up to the Raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts in 1704, the raid itself, and the legacies in its aftermath. But beyond the historic scenarios, are the stories of the people who were there. Through primary source documents and in-depth research this site captures and brings to life the involvement of culturally distinct groups of people and conveys the meaning it had for each one. The lives of Native Americans (W├┤banaki, Kanienkehaka, and Wendat), African slaves, and English and French colonists intersected at this moment in history to play significant roles in the Raid on Deerfield.

When you get to the site, you will see a menu. To get the most out of this site the FIRST thing you should do is click on “Play the Introduction to 1704.” Wait a minute for the video/audio to load and then sit back and enjoy the introductory presentation as it lays the foundation for everything else you will find at this site.

Once you watch the introduction, then you can either follow the menu outline to examine each section of the site in orderly sequence, or you can pick and choose the various aspects of the site you’d like to explore including: 

  • Meet the 5 Cultures – Meet the 5 cultural groups involved in the raid, and engage in an in-depth exploration of their history, lifestyles, habits, and how they interacted.
  • Go To The Story Menu – This timeline depicts the events and conflict preceding the raid, the raid itself, and the aftermath. Each segment is described from the perspective of each culture that was present.
  • Enter The Conflict – View maps of Deerfield and the surrounding area, get explanations for what occurred, meet the people involved in the raid, and examine artifacts.

Each of the above selections contain many links to resources for further exploration. You can skim for general information or delve into the content depending on your level of interest.

Don’t forget to check out the mini-menu bar on each page of the site. In addition to the above items, it contains a shortcut to hearing a radio broadcast commemorating the Raid, as well as audio snippets of legends and stories told by each of the different cultures involved in the Raid on Deerfield. You can also hear English songs and French music circa 1650-1750.

This is an exceptionally designed website that provides a multicultural glimpse of early American history through five different perspectives and interpretations of the facts. As mentioned in the audio/video introduction, there isn’t one truth provided here – rather they consider all of truths from different perspectives. The purpose is to bring history alive in all its uncertainties so we can begin to ask helpful questions that enable us to understand the past. Highly recommended.

Note: While this site is probably designed with middle school students and up in mind, younger students may enjoy aspects of the site on a visit with mom or dad.

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