Posts Tagged ‘Library of Congress’

Free Women’s History Month Lessons

March 26th, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, March 26, 2020, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Women’s History Month

(womenshistorymonth.gov/)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12 approximately, with parental supervision)

 

Here is another resource for Women’s History Month that recognizes and celebrates the importance of women and their role in history. This website, sponsored by the Library of Congress, offers extensive free resources including articles, exhibitions, audio/visual presentations, lessons, activities and more to learn about women’s history.

When you get to the website you’ll see an introduction and featured highlights and events. Use the menu at the top to access: 

  • Exhibits & Collections – An archive of links to resources that include virtual field trips to historic places such as the homes of Clara Barton and Eleanor Roosevelt, and links to information on Women’s Rights, and women in Performing Arts, Government and Politics, Culture and Folklife, and much more.
  • Audio/Video – Enjoy audio and video presentations about women in Arts and Culture, Business and Economics, Civil Rights, Music and Performing Arts, Poetry and Literature, and more.
  • For Teachers – Access ready-to-use lesson plans, collection guides and research aids.

There is a massive amount of content here, so bookmark the site to return often.

Become a History Detective

January 2nd, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, January 2, 2019, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Historical Scene Investigation

(hsionline.org/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website provides social studies students with the opportunity to become virtual history detectives through investigating primary source documents.

Students investigate prepared “case files” about historical events by examining primary source materials archived at this website. Through these “journals, diaries, artifacts, historic sites, works of art, quantitative data, and other evidence from the past… they compare the multiple points of view of those on the scene at the time.”

Developed in partnership with the College of William & Mary School of Education, University of Kentucky School of Education, and the Library of Congress, H.S.I. is an effort to take students beyond textbook facts and give them “experiences that more closely resemble the work of a real historian.”

When you get to the website you’ll see a menu that offers information about the H.S.I. Project and a link to the “Investigations” that include: 

  • Jamestown Starving Time
  • Bacon’s Rebellion
  • The Boston “Massacre”
  • Lexington and Concord
  • Constitution Controversy<
  • Antonio a Slave
  • Finding Aaron
  • Children in the Civil War
  • School Desegregation
  • Case of Sam Smiley
  • March on Frankfort
  • When Elvis Met Nixon

Click on any “case file” and a new page opens with a description of the historic event and a question for the student to answer through investigating documents. Click on “Student View” to read the documents and access a series of questions that guide the student in analyzing the information in order to crack the case.

Library of Congress: Lewis & Clark Exhibit

July 26th, 2019

 

It’s Friday, July 26, 2019, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Lewis & Clark Exhibit

(www.loc.gov/exhibits/lewisandclark/virtualtour/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

With this website, explore the Northwest Gallery of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress to discover maps, notes, manuscripts, and more from the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Begin your tour by selecting the “enter tour” link on the first slide. Watch the slide show introduction then the tour begins. In each slide, select an image in the timeline to enlarge. Read through the text then click on the image to get a larger view. Select “Go Back” at the bottom of the slide to return to the timeline. Some images will open a new window with a presentation on the Library of Congress website. Simply close the window to return to the virtual tour. Select “Continue Tour” to move along. Sections of the timeline include: 

  • Prologue
  • Before Lewis & Clark
    • Beyond the Allegheny Mountains
    • The Spanish Entrada into the Southwest
    • Exploration of the Missouri River
    • British Passage to the Pacific
    • Louisiana Purchase
  • Lewis & Clark
    • Discovering Diplomacy
    • Geography
    • Animals
    • Dressed in Courage
    • Plants
  • After Lewis & Clark
    • The Journeys of Zebulon Montgomery Pike
    • Long’s Expedition to the Central and Southern Plains
    • The Fur Trade
    • Wilkes and Frémont Expeditions
    • Boundary Surveys
  • Epilogue-Transcontinental Railroad Surveys

If you prefer not to use the interactive tour, visit the Rivers, Edens, Empires webpage on the Library of Congress site using the link under the interactive tour window.

Not only is this an interesting tour of the artifacts in the museum, but a wonderful addition to your westward expansion studies.

Performing Arts with Bob Hope

April 27th, 2019

 

It’s Saturday, April 27, 2019, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Bob Hope and American Variety

www.loc.gov/exhibits/bobhope/)

Age Range: 11 and up (Grades 6 and up, approximately; children with parental supervision)

 

The Library of Congress offers this free online presentation of the life of entertainer Bob Hope and the history of American Variety entertainment including Vaudeville, Radio, Movies, Television, and more.


Using photographs, illustrations, and text, this exhibit provides a biography of Hope’s career that provides fascinating historical information about the performing arts as well. 

When you get to the website use the menu in the middle that includes:

  • Early Life – Find out where Bob Hope was born, his real name, and how he got his start in show business.
  • Vaudeville – Discover Hope’s journey through vaudeville and get some terrific insight about what made this artform so popular.
  • Motion Pictures – Learn about the country’s transition to film making and the role of Hope’s series of “Road” pictures from 1940-1962 with Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour.
  • Joke File – Explore Hope’s theft-proof joke vault with more than 85,00 pages of  bits, sketches, and jokes created by his team of comedy writers.
  • On The Road: USO Shows – Read about Hope’s 50-years of performing variety shows for U.S. troops.
  • And more!

This interesting exhibition about Hope’s life provides keen insight into American history, culture, life, and values. It may springboard interest in watching some of Hope’s films that the whole family may find entertaining. You can rent DVDs of Hope’s “Road” pictures such as Road to Singapore and Road to Rio. Your public library may have them as well.

Strike up the Band with John Philip Sousa

March 9th, 2019

 

It’s Saturday, March 9, 2019, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Complete Marches of John Philip Sousa

(tinyurl.com/yaxs58vp)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

This website features a lot of the works of John Philip Sousa – most famous for his marches, particularly, “Stars and Stripes Forever,” the official march of the United States of America.

When you get to the site, click on any of the marches listed to read a little blurb about each work. You can download the track, download the full score and parts, and/or listen to the U.S. Marine Band play the piece. You can also download each of the 4 volumes to listen any time!

To learn more about Sousa’s life, The Library of Congress has links to a biography and articles about “The March King” and a timeline. Start the parade!

Historical Music from the Library of Congress

August 11th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, August 11, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Library of Congress: National Jukebox

(www.loc.gov/jukebox/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision. NOTE: See warning below.)

 

The Library of Congress provides a “National Jukebox” that makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge.

This exhibit transforms your computer into a gramophone featuring more than 10,000 78rpm disc recordings issued by the Victor Talking Machine Company between 1900 and 1925. You can listen to a broad range of songs including marching band music, novelty tunes, hits from musical theater productions, dance tunes, and opera arias. You’ll also find spoken recordings.

When you get to the site, you’ll see the music audio player – and just above it this: 

WARNING: Historical recordings may contain offensive language.

These music selections are presented as part of the record of the past. They are historical documents which reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of people in a very different time period. For that reason, they may contain content that is offensive to users. As always, PARENTS SHOULD PREVIEW THE SITE and supervise all Internet activity.

Once you get past the disclaimer, look below the audio player to find a menu of featured recordings and playlists. Use the menu in the left margin that includes: 

  • Browse all Recordings – Search by language, target audience, record label, date range, composer, lyricist, performer and genre.
  • Artists – Browse the artists from A-Z. Find recordings by music greats such as opera singer Enrico Caruso, Broadway legends Al Jolson and Fanny Brice, whistling virtuoso Charles Kellogg, composer and band leader John Philip Sousa, and thousands more.
  • Genres – Find a wide selection of genres of music including classical, opera, religious, popular music, blues, ethnic music, humorous songs, etc.

This is an AMAZING musical resource that takes time to explore. Bookmark it to return often.

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