Posts Tagged ‘lab’

The Great Backyard Bird Count

February 11th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, February 11, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Backyard Bird Count

(www.audubon.org/content/about-great-backyard-bird-count)

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

Mark your calendars and get ready to participate in “The Great Backyard Bird Count” scheduled for February 14-17, 2020.

This annual event, sponsored by the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, is your opportunity to join a citizen-science project (for kids, teens, and adults) that helps scientists collect data and investigate far-reaching questions about bird populations.

It only takes as little as 15 minutes on one day. You simply count the birds you see in your backyard and turn in the results. It’s free, fun, and easy – and it helps the scientists to help the birds.

To learn how to participate go to The Great Backyard Birdcount website. Use the menu to register, learn about birds, and view the bird photo gallery.

Now, if this sparks your family’s interest in birds, you are sure to enjoy this website: WhatBird.com. Use a tool that helps you to identify a bird by what it looks like. You simply enter its attributes such as habitat, size, color, body shape, bill shape, etc., to drill down results, choosing as many options as you can along the way.

[ClickSchooling] TED.com: Agile Aerial Robots

January 14th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, January 14, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

TED.com: Agile Aerial Robots

(http://www.ted.com/talks/vijay_kumar_robots_that_fly_and_cooperate.html)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 4 and up approximately; children with parental supervision)

 

This is a fascinating and entertaining physics tutorial on the development of tiny, autonomous, agile, aerial robots that have many applications – from being first responders in disaster situations to playing musical instruments.

In this 17-minute video filmed for TED.com (TED stands for “Technology, Entertainment & Design”), the speaker is Vijay Kumar from the General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) Lab, at the University of Pennsylvania. He and his students blend computer science and mechanical engineering to create the next generation of robotic wonders.

Watch as the flying quadrotor robots fly through hula hoops, work together to build construction projects, provide 3-D imaging of buildings, and even play musical instruments.

If this doesn’t get you interested in science, physics, engineering, entertainment, and the possibilities they offer – nothing will.

Fun Periodic Table of Videos

October 15th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, October 15, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Periodic Videos

(www.periodicvideos.com/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

What a find! This website teaches the periodic table with videos!

When you click on an element on the periodic table, it plays a video showing educational experiments and explanations about that element. (Okay, while this site is probably designed for middle school, high school, and beyond, younger children will enjoy seeing some of the experiments. Plus, we’ve found that little kids lap up information about the Periodic Table, so don’t be shy about introducing them to it.)

This is so much fun! Each video is short (up to about 10 minutes) and provides basic information about the featured element, it’s history, and how it is used. You can tell the chemists, who narrate while demonstrating experiments with the various elements, love what they do!

Consider starting with Lithium (Li). It’s very reactive in water and the clip is fun to watch. Then try Hydrogen (H) or Helium (He) to see a big bang! (Careful – kids may be tempted to try this at home, so parental guidance and safety discussions are required.) The Phosphorus (P) video will really amaze your kids when they learn there’s about a pound of this reactive element in their bodies!

The scientists in the lab have a lot fun demonstrating the properties of the elements – and their antics with beakers, Bunsen burners, and bloopers are narrated by mild-mannered professor Martyn Poliakoff who has wonderful, wild, Einstein-ish hair! Some of his descriptions are hilarious – such as when he describes what can be done with Nitrogen (N). (Preview it, as it might alarm younger children.)

Note: We didn’t watch all of the videos. Therefore, parents AS ALWAYS should preview the videos BEFORE showing them to children to determine suitability of content.

The Periodic Table of Videos is educational, fun, and not to be missed!

The Great Backyard Bird Count

February 5th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, February 5, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Backyard Bird Count

(www.audubon.org/content/about-great-backyard-bird-count)

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

Mark your calendars and get ready to participate in “The Great Backyard Bird Count” scheduled for February 15-18, 2019.

This annual event, sponsored by the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, is your opportunity to join a citizen-science project (for kids, teens, and adults) that helps scientists collect data and investigate far-reaching questions about bird populations.

It only takes as little as 15 minutes on one day. You simply count the birds you see in your backyard and turn in the results. It’s free, fun, and easy – and it helps the scientists to help the birds.

To learn how to participate go to The Great Backyard Birdcount website. Use the menu to register, learn about birds, and view the bird photo gallery.


Now, if this sparks your family’s interest in birds, you are sure to enjoy this website: WhatBird.com. Use a tool that helps you to identify a bird by what it looks like. You simply enter its attributes such as habitat, size, color, body shape, bill shape, etc., to drill down results, choosing as many options as you can along the way.

Lab Science Videos, Activities, Worksheets, & Games

January 22nd, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, January 22, 20198, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Jefferson Lab Science Series

(education.jlab.org/scienceseries/archive.html)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website is sponsored by The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

The lab’s primary mission is to conduct research on the atom’s nucleus using the lab’s unique particle accelerator. In addition to its science mission, the Lab provides programs and resources designed to help educate the public in science and technology, including a free “Science Series” of engaging lectures that are video-recorded and archived at the website for viewing. Plus, the Lab offers free learning resources including activities, worksheets, games, and more

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of the “Science Series” video titles including: 

  • What Every Dog Should Know About Quantum Physics
  • The Origin of the Elements
  • Adventures in Infectious Diseases
  • DNA: The Strand that Connects Us All
  • Einstein for Everyone
  • Understanding Flight: A Physical Description of How Airplanes Fly
  • The Physics of Stock Car Racing from a NASCAR Champion’s Perspective
  • The Physics of Baseball
  • Comic Book Physics
  • Chemistry – It’s More Than Puffs and Bangs!
  • Radiation: What Is It and How Can It Affect Me?
  • Jellyfish: The Big Sting
  • From Acne to Suntans: Dermatology for the Teenager
  • And many more!

Each title has a brief description and a link you can click to watch the video online.

Wait! There’s more! When you’re through watching the lectures check out the Education Home section of this site that contains free resources including hands-on activities, worksheets, puzzles and games. Look in the “Teacher Resources,” “Student Zone,” and “Games & Puzzles” sections to access all of the free science goodies.

Lessons from the Norman Rockwell Museum

November 10th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, November 10, 2018, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Norman Rockwell Museum – Curriculum Lab

(www.nrm.org/learn/curriculum-lab/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Use the art of Norman Rockwell for your history, social studies and language arts classes with the lessons from this section of the larger Norman Rockwell Museum website.

When arriving at today’s link you will see images of some of Rockwell’s iconic work. Hover over the image to reveal the lesson name and suggested grade level. Or use the dropdown boxes above the images to search for lessons for a specific grade, subject, or theme. There are also three lessons featuring the work of Jerry Pinkney and can be sorted by using the “Artist” dropdown menu. 

Examples of units include: 

  • What’s the Headline – (Grades 6-12) Using the “War News” painting, explore the events leading up to the invasion of Normandy.
  • WWII on the Homefront The Four Freedoms – (All grades) Get creative with art and writing while learning about the purpose of Rockwell’s Four Freedoms.
  • Story Sparks – (Grades K-5) Use Rockwell’s works as inspiration for creative writing.
  • On the Twentieth Century – That was Then, This is Now – (All grades) Discover how Rockwell’s paintings depicted life in America and compare how life has changed from then to today.
  • Going and Coming – (All grades) Use the image to practice creative writing and communication of ideas skills.
  • And more

Lessons include objective information as well as the plan process. Some also include downloadable materials and suggestions for further exploration of the topic and image.

It appears that this section may still be under construction as there are occasional texts that say “[insert link to images]” but don’t let that stop you from taking a look at the site. Norman Rockwell fans will appreciate using his art for extended activities into other school subjects.

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