Posts Tagged ‘lab’

Try a Math Snack!

June 6th, 2022

It’s Monday, June 6, 2022, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

New Mexico State University: Math Snacks

(mathsnacks.com/)

Grades 4-8, with parental supervision

New Mexico State University Learning Games Lab created this site, which aims to provide “smart educational animations, games, and interactive tools that help mid-school learners better understand math concepts.”

The site’s collection of “snacks” are highly entertaining educational movies, games, and apps that focus on specific mathematical concepts, each requiring only a small amount of time. Some of the videos and games you’ll find include:

  • Watch the fabled Atlantis sink, thanks to a Dodgeball coach who lacks a clear understanding of ratios.
  • Identify numbers that sum to ten, and decimals that sum to 1 – while driving a school bus full of monsters and deforming the neighborhood (this one you’ve got to see to believe).
  • Watch a supervillain and superhero match wits, scaling things up and down by the same factor.

There are many more as well. Look under the “Teaching With” link to find guides for student and teacher, as well as transcripts of the video clips, and more, to help solidify the concepts.

A handy reminder from the teachers’ page: “Math Snacks isn’t a curriculum, but a series of activities you can use with the curriculum you are already using in grades 4-8.” Since they’re snacks, you’ll be glad to hear that they’re portable; if you have a mobile device, you can learn something new on the go!

What Is Science & How Does It Work?

May 3rd, 2022

It’s Tuesday, May 3, 2022, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

The University of California Museum of Paleontology: Understanding Science

(undsci.berkeley.edu/)

Grades K & up, with parental supervision

The University of California Museum of Paleontology (with funding by the National Science Foundation) provides this website that endeavors to provide fun, accessible and free resources that accurately communicate what science is and how it really works.

The activities here are designed to improve students’ ability to critically assess scientific evidence and understand the strengths, limitations, and basic methods of science.

When you get to the website you’ll see a variety of ways to get started. Explore the website or jump right into the lesson called “Understanding Science 101.”

Look for “For Teachers” as well. Use the grade level key below it. Click on a grade level and a new page opens. Scroll to “Getting Started” and below it, click on “Sample Starting Activities.” Here is just an example of what is available in each grade level:

  • K-2 – Exploring Liquids — Students use their senses to investigate and observe three liquids.
  • 3-5 – Tennis Shoe Detectives — Students make observations, examine data, and form hypotheses about a set of footprints.
  • 6-8 – Exploring Bouncing Balls — Students explore the physical properties of a variety of balls.
  • 9-12 – The Checks Lab — Students construct plausible scenarios to explain a series of bank checks.
  • 13-16 – Umbrellaology — Students are asked to read a letter that describes detailed data collected on umbrellas.

In addition to the sample activities, you’ll also find tips for assessing your student’s ability, tips for teaching science, and a variety of more free lessons as well.

There is a great deal of free content here. Bookmark the site to make return visits.

Become a Mad Scientist!

March 8th, 2022

Reeko’s Mad Scientist Lab: Experiments

(reekoscience.com/category/science-experiments)

Grades: All, with parental supervision 

This ad-supported website is a treasure trove of free, fun, and fascinating science experiments that will bring out the “mad scientist” in everyone.

When you get to the site, there are 9 pages of science experiments that you can click on directly. Or you can hover your mouse over “Science Experiments” and click on the category of interest:

  • Atomic/Electric
  • Chemical Reactions
  • Chemistry Experiments
  • Cohesion
  • Flotation
  • Geometry and Math
  • Inertia/Momentum
  • Light and Vision
  • Miscellaneous Science Experiments
  • Motion/Energy
  • Pressure
  • Sound and Vibrations

You’ll find a complete description of the experiment, instructions on how to conduct it, and a list of the materials you will need. You also get an explanation of the scientific principles that govern the experiment.

From the traditional experiments of science fairs such as making a volcano or a lemon battery, to more unusual projects like making a cloud in a bottle or starting a fire with water – your whole family will have fun learning from the science activities at this site.

Don’t miss the “Fun Stuff” section where you will find puzzles, fun activities using encrypted messages, games, and science trivia.

Bookmark this site for access to science learning year ’round!

Creative & Interactive Periodic Table of Elements

November 30th, 2021

University of Nottingham:  BEST Periodic Table of Elements on the Net

The Periodic Table of Elements has become much easier to understand through the interactive capability of technology. Here is a recap of some of the BEST periodic tables I’ve reviewed for ClickSchooling over the past 15 years.  

Grade 4 & up approximately, with parental supervision

The Periodic Table of Videos

(www.periodicvideos.com/)

In my opinion, this is the most fun periodic table on the Net. When you click on an element on the periodic table, it plays a video showing scientists in the lab having fun demonstrating the properties of the elements. Developed by the University of Nottingham, each video is short (2-4 minutes) and provides basic information about the featured element, it’s history, and how it is used. The scientists’ antics with beakers, Bunsen burners, and bloopers are narrated by mild-mannered professor Martyn Poliakoff who has wonderful, wild, Einstein-ish hair!

WebElements

(www.webelements.com/index.html)

This is a click-and-learn table. Each element opens to its own page, maintained by the site that includes a description and photographs. This table has all kinds of hyperlinks within the descriptions to further explain the aspects of the element, along with an interesting sidebar that mentions the element’s uses and where it can be found.

The Photographic Periodic Table

(periodictable.com/)

Includes a photograph of every element on the periodic table, along with a description of the element. Some of them are beautiful – this is a visual treat!

Games: Chemical Elements & Their Symbols

(www.quia.com/custom/3main.html)

Provides free learning tools and games to help budding chemists memorize facts from the Period Table of Elements through:

  • Flash Cards
  • Match Game
  • Word Search
  • Concentration

The Periodic Table of Comic Books

(www.uky.edu/Projects/Chemcomics/index.html)

A couple of chemists took it upon themselves to collect comic strips that mention elements from the Periodic Table and compile them on this website.

Fun Science Projects Resource

June 29th, 2021

Instructables – Science

(www.instructables.com/teachers/projects/?subjects=science)

Grades K and up, with parental supervision

This ad-supported website contains thousands of instructions explaining how to do a wide variety of things from cooking to building robots and much more.

As the website explains, “Instructables is a web-based documentation platform where passionate people share what they do and how they do it, and learn from and collaborate with others. The seeds of Instructables germinated at the MIT Media Lab as the future founders of Squid Labs built places to share their projects and help others.”

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of icons including:

  • Model Earth
  • Solar System Dimensions
  • Homemade Parachute
  • Alka-Seltzer Rockets
  • Build a Model of a Human Cell
  • Make a Human Lung Model
  • Rainbow in a Bottle
  • and much more!

This is a terrific resource you can refer to again and again. Bookmark it to return often!

NOTE – Parents, as always, should preview the site to determine suitability of content and supervise all Internet use.

Terrific Science Freebies

May 4th, 2021

Terrific Science

(www.terrificscience.org/freebies/)

Grades K-12, with parental supervision

 

This website, developed by two enthusiastic chemistry teachers named Mickey and Lynn, provides a wide assortment of free lessons and activities that teach students of all ages the scientific method through fun, hands-on investigations.

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of the “Freebies” including:

  • Lesson and Lab Exchange – Get hundreds of free, downloadable science lessons for elementary, middle school, and high school students. These lessons run the gamut from teaching chemistry with glitter wands to an 8-part series on forensic science.
  • National Chemistry Week – Explore an archive of chemistry lessons and experiments offered during Chemistry Week in 2005-2008.
  • Health Science Resources – Enjoy hands-on activities that emphasize water safety, personal hygiene, indoor pollution, chemical safety, skin health, and information on drug-resistant bacteria.
  • Terrific Science Movies plus Activities – View a variety of movies (excerpts from the science teachers’ workshops) that include fun animations and activity demonstrations. Some of the movies have accompanying activity instructions.

When you’re through exploring the “Freebies,” poke around the rest of the website for additional information and resources on the art of teaching science.

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