Posts Tagged ‘experiments’

Chemistry Experiment Videos

February 8th, 2022

Chemistry Comes Alive: Chemistry Experiment Video Collection

(www.chemedx.org/page/video)

Ages 10 & up, with PARENTAL SUPERVISION. (See note in review.)

A BIG THANK YOU goes out to ClickScholar Deena Ortiz from Rancho Cucamonga who suggested this website that offers free video clips of various chemistry experiments along with explanations of the science behind them. This “Chemistry Video Collection” from the Journal of Chemical Education is entertaining and sure to ignite interest in this fascinating branch of science. The science explanations here are geared for middle school or high school level and up, but many of the experiments are fun to watch regardless of age.

NOTE: While the experiments in the videos are conducted in controlled and safe laboratories, they are dangerous and involve explosions. AS ALWAYS, parents should preview the videos to determine the suitability of content. If you watch the videos with your children be certain they know to NEVER try these experiments at home.

When you get to the site you’ll see the videos listed down the center of the screen. You can also choose the most popular videos in the lists on the right of the screen. Click on a video and click start to begin. Turn on your speakers to listen to the narration of the experiment. Some of

the experiments include:

  • Reaction of sodium and chlorine
  • The Chemistry of Outer Space
  • See An Explosion Caused by a Feather
  • Watch What Happens When You Mix Sodium with Acid
  • Electrolysis of silver nitrate
  • Dehydration of sucrose with sulfuric acid

Again, these are fascinating experiments to watch and may jumpstart interest in chemistry.

Bring Physics to Life Through Pictures!

February 1st, 2022

Physics Central: Physics In Pictures

(www.physicscentral.com/explore/pictures/)

Grade: Around middle school & up; younger children may enjoy as well. Parental supervision required.

Want to get your physics on? This is the place! The American Physical Society sponsors this exciting website that demonstrates through multi-media technology, how things work and the importance of physics to everyone. You’ll find free information on the physics of light, sound, matter and more in the form of articles, animations, and videos.

The site is massive, so I’m featuring one of the most engaging sections for this review called “Physics In Pictures.” It provides virtual “illustrations of nature’s infinite variety and humankind’s ingenuity.”

Each picture and title entices you to want to know more. You can explore the science content by reading a brief explanation and then further your learning with links to stories on related current physics research. Your brain can take a quick dip in the physics waters or dive in and soak it all up.

When you get to the site, you’ll see some featured “Physics Pictures” that include. Click on any one to learn more. Then, if you look at the menu on the right side of the screen, you’ll see a list of “Physics in Pictures by Topic” that includes:

  • Chaos
  • Compression Waves & Sound
  • Electricity & Magnetism
  • Force & Motion
  • Light & Optics
  • Material Science
  • Quantum Mechanics
  • Space & the Universe
  • Thermodynamics & Heat

Click on a topic to explore more. When you’re through, use the menu at the top of the screen and click on “Experiment.” You’ll be rewarded with experiments to try at home along with other activities sponsored by this website.

See How Balloons are Made

January 7th, 2022

Balloon Headquarters

(www.balloonhq.com/faq/making.html)

Grades 3-12, with parental supervision

Ever wonder how latex and Mylar balloons are made? You can find out by taking a virtual field trip to this site.

When you get there scroll down a little and you can read a general overview and some Q&A’s about how balloons are manufactured. There are some photographs that help illustrate the text. You will discover how balloons are molded, how the rolled lip is formed, how they are colored and imprinted, and there is even information on how to make latex balloons at home! (Parental supervision is required!)

But don’t stop with the tour. This site has all kinds of fascinating and educational information about balloons (some more appropriate for high school level and beyond). When you finish the “tour” click on “The Guide” on the menu at the top of the screen. Look under the headline: The How’s and Why’s of Balloons. You will see a menu that offers:

  • How balloons are made – click on it to repeat the tour.
  • How helium-filled balloons float – includes a discussion of “Archimedes’ Principle.”
  • How balloons pop – an in-depth discussion of the effects of static electricity on balloons, an engineer’s explanation of stress on balloons, the molecule arrangement of balloons, and much more.
  • Balloon Science 101 – includes science discussion about balloons from the simple to the highly technical (for example: Stupid Human Tricks with balloons to Entropy and the 2nd law of thermodynamics as applied to latex).
  • Balloons and Teaching – a complete 6-week sample curriculum that covers balloon safety, twisting balloons, connecting balloons, making balloon sculptures, hats, and critters – and some interesting suggestions/experiments with balloons and dry ice.

You can also read all about the history of balloons and much more! This is a delightful site for the balloon aficionado in your family.

We also found a YouTube video of how balloons are made. Be sure to have a gross of balloons handy – the urge to inflate and pop will be overwhelming!

Christmas Science Fun!

December 21st, 2021

Science Sparks – Christmas Science

(www.science-sparks.com/christmas-science/)

Grades K-8, with parental supervision

We’ve recently reviewed other parts of this website but we thought with the season upon us it would be appropriate to spotlight these 20 Christmas-themed science experiments.

You’ll find experiments for the kitchen, the playroom and even outside. These are fun and there is something here that everyone will enjoy!

In the kitchen enjoy these:

  • Make some spiced apple cider and explore filtering at the same time.
  • Make lovely mint-flavored chocolate leaves and learn about changes of state.
  • Create fizzing Christmas trees or gingerbread men.

In the playroom try:

  • a Christmas-themed magnet or marble maze.
  • How about making jumping snowmen or Christmas trees using static electricity?
  • Designing some symmetrical Christmas trees.
  • Making a Christmas-themed Optical Illusion.

Outside explore:

  • Create wonderful ice ornaments.
  • Work out how tall your Christmas tree is without measuring it.

There is much more here including activities for younger children. Bookmark this page and use it throughout the holiday season.

All About Benjamin Franklin

December 7th, 2021

The Electric Ben Franklin: Benjamin Franklin!

(www.ushistory.org/franklin/index.htm)

Grades 4-12, with parental supervision

This ad-supported website offers a wealth of information and fun trivia on the subject of Benjamin Franklin!

When you get to the website, use the menu on the left side of the screen to explore:

  • A Timeline of Franklin’s Life with notable historic events and achievement
  • Franklin’s Inventions – including bifocal glasses, electricity, the lightning rod, a Franklin stove, a map of the Gulf Stream, swim fins, odometer – and find out what he didn’t invent too!
  • Franklin’s Entire Autobiography including an account of his famous kite experiment
  • You can also read an original work of historical fiction called Temple’s Diary in which a 15-year-old boy discovers that he is the grandson of Benjamin Franklin!

Explore Philadelphia and Franklin’s old haunts. Read his wise and wonderful sayings. You’ll even find experiments to do at home along with interactive games that help to explain the concepts of Franklin’s many discoveries.

This is a wonderful unit study online that will appeal to the whole family — don’t miss it!

Note: This website is part of the larger USHistory.org site. Be sure to visit the home page to see all that this site has to offer.

Books that Have Shaped American History

November 3rd, 2021

Library of Congress: Books That Shaped America’s History

(www.loc.gov/exhibits/books-that-shaped-america/)

Grades 5 & up, with parental supervision

The Library of Congress has a current exhibition called “Books That Shaped America” that highlights books that have had a historical impact on the lives of Americans through the ages.

The titles featured are by American authors and as the website explains, ” Some of the titles on display have been the source of great controversy, even derision, yet they nevertheless shaped Americans’ views of their world and often the world’s view of the United States.” The Library of Congress encourages visitors to read the books exhibited to explore the breadth and depth of America’s literary tradition.

This online exhibit presents a unique opportunity to identify books of historical importance by era. When you get to the site, you’ll see a menu of featured “Themes” or periods of time, with icon images of a few of the book titles. Click on the link that says “View all items…” under each era including:

  • 1750 to 1800 – Find book titles such as, Experiments and Observations on Electricity by Benjamin Franklin, Common Sense by Thomas Paine, The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, and even the first American cookbook.
  • 1800 to 1850 – You’ll find Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a book featuring papers written by Lewis & Clark about their great expedition, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas. You’ll discover why these books were of great historical importance
  • 1850 to 1900 – The titles here will most likely be much more familiar and include,The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Moby Dick by Herman Melville, Walden by Henry David Thoreau, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and many more.
  • 1900 to 1950 – Book titles you’ll recognize include The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, Jack London’s Call of the Wild, The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and more.
  • 1950 to 2000 – Discover Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, The Double Helix by James D. Watson, The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss, Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, etc.

Click on any book image and a new page opens that explains what the book is about and why it is historically significant. Some of the explanations are thought-provoking – and could stimulate lots of discussions.

You might want to copy the titles and use them as a guide the next time you head to the library for a good read.

css.php