Posts Tagged ‘challenge’

Art Tutorials for Middle & High School

March 19th, 2022

John MacTaggart: Artyfactory

(www.artyfactory.com/)

Grades 6 and up, with parental supervision

This ad-supported website includes step-by-step, how-to art lessons. It also offers art appreciation tutorials on topics like “Still Life” or “Animals in Art” or broader “Art Movements.”

Description: When you get to the site, choose from:

  • Art Lessons
  • Art Appreciation
  • Design Lessons

Little ones can’t interact with Artyfactory on their own. The content and writing are at an advanced level. (In fact, it is suspect most of the content doubles as MacTaggart’s college course material.) But there’s tremendous potential here for a creative homeschooler as follows:

  • Use it directly as reading or coursework for a high school student.

  • Adapt the lessons for younger pupils. The “Pencil Shading” exercises, for example, found under “Pencil Portraits” in the Art Lessons section, would be a fun challenge. The “How to Draw Animals” lessons might work with a talented middle school student, too, but these are no Ed Emberley thumbprints: they require a good eye and a controlled hand.
  • Fill in holes in your own knowledge. After spending some time on this site you’ll be able to introduce your children to Expressionism paintings and more next time you visit a museum.

There’s a wealth of information here: color theory (both technical stuff like the color wheel and the emotional impact of colors in painting), a thorough overview of African masks and Egyptian hieroglyphs, shading techniques in pen and ink, etc.

NOTE: As always, PARENTS SHOULD PREVIEW the site to determine suitability of content for your own children.

Master Human Anatomy

January 18th, 2022

Anatomy Arcade

(www.anatomyarcade.com/)

HSBC Member Pam M suggested an interactive website, Anatomy Arcade, which makes basic human anatomy come ALIVE through awesome free flash games, interactives and videos created by Ben Crossett a Science and Physical Education teacher at Glen Waverley Secondary College in Melbourne, Australia.

Anatomy Arcade is perfect for the novice teenager in the classroom, right through to students and professionals of health care looking for a fun way to revise.

The price and joy of Anatomy Arcade are the Signature games.

Crosswords are not for the beginner unless you use them like a web quest. The word searches are fun and easy for everyone.

Match Two games are a fun challenge for all and can build strong word/image associations.

Bigfish games with a medical, health and fitness focus.

There is a cost factor to part of this website.

U.S. & International Geography Game!

December 4th, 2021

Challenging & Fun Geography Game!

(www.globalschoolnet.org/geogame/index.cfm)

All grades, with parental supervision

Sponsored by Microsoft and affiliated with the Global SchoolNet Foundation, this website links children around the world through a myriad of FREE features and activities that you can explore when you get to the site

You must register to participate in the activities including the incredible Geo Game and GeoGame Project that helps kids learn geography terms, teaches them how to read and interpret maps, and increases their awareness of geographical and cultural diversity. It’s designed for middle to upper ELEMENTARY students, but students in all grade levels are encouraged to play.

When you get to the site click on the “Project Description” in the center of the screen. It will explain the GeoGame project and the GeoGame. Don’t skip this, as it will really make navigating the site MUCH EASIER. It provides teaching strategies and explains what materials you will need to play the game (i.e., U.S. map with time zones & latitudes, road maps, atlas, almanac, encyclopedia, etc.). This is especially helpful if you want to participate in the project — which is a little different than just playing the GeoGame.

Of course, you can just play the GeoGame without participating in the project. In that case, read through the directions for playing the game and then click on “Play the Game” on the menu at the top of the screen. (Don’t forget, you will have to register to play.) A new page opens with a selection of traditional GeoGames. Select a game category of interest and a new page opens listing the games in that category by I.D. number. Click on a specific game and a new page opens asking you to match the geography clues with the names of various cities and geographical locations. You will need the suggested materials (maps, etc.) to decipher the clues in order to match them to the city or location they describe. Allow at least 30 minutes or more to play the games — as research is a big part of the challenge in order to win!

This really is a remarkable use of technology and cooperative effort by students, teachers, parents, and educators to improve everyone’s knowledge of the world.

Corn-Themed Math & Activities

November 8th, 2021

Camp Silos: Corn Math

(www.campsilos.org/mod3/students/index.shtml)

All grades, with parental supervision

At this archived website, you will find interesting corn-themed activities and lessons in math (and more!) that are geared for about 4th grade and up. However, there is material that younger children will enjoy as well.

When you get to the site you will see quick facts about corn math, corn products, and corn geography. But that’s not all! There is a menu at the top of the page with lessons and web-based activities designed for classroom use (that can be tweaked for home use) that include:

History Detective – A remarkable exploration of the history of corn including Native American folk tales about corn.

  • Scavenger Hunt – Take the challenge and find the answers to the questions about corn by following Internet links to information resources. Then take the “Corny Quiz.”
  • Newsroom – Develop a video segment about corn production for KORN-TV by following the lesson plan and using web-based research.
  • Mystery Photo – An exploration of the microscopic world of corn.
  • Amazing Mazes: Find out about the history of corn mazes. Then create your own computer-generated maze!

Then on the sidebar, check out:

  • Teachers – The teacher section offers an outline of the lessons contained at this site, along with information on curriculum standards addressed by the lessons. It provides background and resources that will help with lesson presentation. Remember, this was designed with the classroom teacher in mind — so some of this may not be as helpful to the home educator.
  • Resources – Contains many links to other websites about corn.

Note: Many of the links on this site are good, but we did find a few dead links since this is an archived site. Regardless, there is so much information here that the dead links are more of a nuisance than a deterrent to learning.

Learn to Play Chess!

September 27th, 2021

ChessKid

(www.chesskid.com/)

Grades 2-12, with parental supervision

This website was designed to help young children learn how to play chess. The game of chess provides intellectual stimulation while improving concentration, logical thought, and critical thinking.

When you get to the site, sign up for the free lessons. Learn about the board and the pieces. Then take some simple quizzes to get a certificate. After this, you can select a virtual opponent and level of challenge for some real practice playing chess.

Parents and teachers who wish to help guide their students through this site can select the sections designed just for them to see the syllabus, direct links to specific lessons, information about privacy, and so on. (But kids can learn a lot here independently as well!)

Chess provides opportunities for friendships, an outlet for competition, and relief from boredom. Chess is a lot of fun!

Celebrate the Ratification of the US Constituation this September with this Excellent Resource!

September 2nd, 2021

Oak Hill Publishing: Constitution Facts

(www.constitutionfacts.com/)

Grades 6-12, with parental supervision

Celebrate the ratification of the United States Constitution that happened on September 17, 1787 with the resources available at this website as well as explore other important documents in American history.

When arriving at the site, visitors can begin by taking the “What’s Your Constitution I.Q.?” quiz by selecting the main image link under the navigation menu. Don’t worry if you don’t get all the answers correct. Wrong answers are explained. After taking the 10-question quiz, there is an opportunity to do an advanced challenge with more difficult questions. Or learn all about the Constitution and the Amendments, Declaration of Independence, the Articles of the Confederation, our Founding Fathers, the Supreme Court and more by selecting a topic from the upper menu. Not only can visitors read through the documents online, but they will find a timeline of related events, learn about the people involved with the drafting and signing of the documents, discover constitutional trivia, dig deeper into significant events surrounding the inception and implementation of the document, browse through papers of our Founding Fathers, review synopsis of landmark Supreme Court cases and much more.

Use the link under the home page main image to locate the “Fun Zone.” On this page you will find games, printable word search and crossword puzzles, printable Treasure Hunt quizzes, and online quizzes.

Check out the “The Founders Library” link in the top menu to find:

  • a list of U.S. Presidents and their portraits
  • reading lists and links of books and journals written by the Founding Fathers
  • things invented by the Founding Fathers
  • a history of the American postal system
  • the content of the Magna Carta
  • modern performances of the music from the American Revolution
  • what traveling was like during colonial times
  • Constitution landmarks such as Independence Hall, Old North Bridge, and “Old Ironsides”
  • Information about the first political parties
  • Constitution inspired artwork
  • Fashion worn by the Founding Fathers
  • Colonial currency

And just for fun, be sure to check out the “Founding Documents in Pop Culture” to see video clips of Captain Kirk and Barney Fife quoting the Preamble, The Preamble Song from Schoolhouse Rock, Benjamin Gates reading from the Declaration of Independence in National Treasure, celebrities reading the Declaration of Independence, and more.

Add this website to your bookmarked links for your American history studies.

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