Posts Tagged ‘astronomy’

Learn all about Saturn and its Moons

June 16th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, June 16, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Solar System Exploration – Cassini

(solarsystem.nasa.gov/missions/cassini/overview/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft arrived at Saturn in July 2004 and, along with the European-built Huygens probe, opened a window into a world never seen before.

When arriving at the website, read the Overview to learn about Saturn and the Cassini mission, lasting over two decades. Make sure to scroll down to see the 10 Ways Cassini Mattered. Next, hover your mouse over the menu in the middle: 

  • The Journey – Timeline, Spacecraft, Grand Finale
  • Mission – The Saturn Tour has photos and videos.
  • Science – Learn about Saturn and its largest moon, Titan, and its tiny moon, Enceladus.
  • Galleries – Images, Videos, and more

After exploring all that this website has to offer, check out the “Kids” link under the “More” menu at the top for coloring pages and activities.

If you know someone interested in astronomy, particularly Saturn, this website is a down-to-earth resource for an out-of this world study.

Learn Geography Through Earth Sciences

April 14th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, April 14, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Geography4Kids

(www.geography4kids.com/)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 4 and up; children with parental supervision)

 

This ad-supported website helps kids (of many ages) learn about geography through earth sciences.

When you get to the site, read the introduction as it contains good info on where to start and how to navigate for best use. To get started scroll half way down the home page and click on “Next Stop On Site Tour”, or use the menu to explore: 

  • Earth Energy – Explore global Geometry, electromagnetic radiation, waves and particles, solar energy, atmospheric interaction, and temperature including Fahrenheit, Celsius, and Kelvin scales.
  • Earth Structure – Learn what the Earth is made of including the plates, mantles, the liquid inner core, the magnetic fields, rocks and minerals, and discover what tectonics has to do with earthquakes and volcanoes.
  • Biosphere – Learn about our living world including ecology, ecosystems, food chains, soil, water, climates, energy, erosion, oxidation, and how it all interacts to support life.
  • Atmosphere – Find out what composes the atmosphere, thermosphere, stratosphere, and troposphere. Learn about temperature and air pressure, altitude, the Coriolis Force, and the Greenhouse Effect.
  • Hydrosphere – Discover how all kinds of water moves through the world including freshwater, seawater, and groundwater. Learn about wetlands and aquatic biomes. Learn how to identify cloud types.
  • Climate – Explore weather, climates (polar, subtropical, tropical), seasons, clouds, hurricanes and monsoons, and check out the instruments used to measure the force and effect of it all.
  • Cycles – Learn about the interactive cycles of our ecosystem that include carbon, water, oxygen, nitrogen, iron, phosphorus, and rocks.

When you are through exploring each section of the site, you can take interactive quizzes to test your knowledge. A bonus feature is that this site provides links to its “sister” sites for further study in the fields of astronomy, biology, chemistry, physics, and math.

This is a terrific resource. We recommend you bookmark it to return often.

The 60+ Symbols of Astronomy & Physics

January 28th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, January 28, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Sixty Symbols

(www.sixtysymbols.com/index.html)

Age Range: 6-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

This fantastic website offers FREE videos about physics and astronomy featuring experts from The University of Nottingham, who explain the strange letters and squiggles (many more than 60 of them) used by scientists.

As explained at the website, “Sixty Symbols is a collection of videos by experts from The University of Nottingham. It’s worth noting many symbols have multiple uses across scientific disciplines and we sometimes tackle them from an unexpected viewpoint.” Here’s some of what you’ll see: 

  • Click on “E” for energy and see an Einstein doll on a swing as a demonstration of potential and kinetic energy.
  • Click on the symbol for the planet Venus (looks like a hand mirror) and learn all about it. You’ll also learn the history of the symbol and its use as the universal symbol for women.
  • What has a symbol of a cat got to do with physics? Visit the site, click on the cat and find out!

When you get to the site you’ll see the table of Sixty Symbols (and then some). Click on any one and a new page opens where a video launches that explains it. They are wonderfully engaging and educating.

American Museum of Natural History’s “Ology”

March 5th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, March 5, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

AMNH: Ology

(www.amnh.org/explore/ology)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

The suffix “ology” refers to the study or a particular field or academic discipline. At this website sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History you can explore archaeology, marine biology, paleontology, and other fields of science such as genetics, astronomy, biodiversity, earth science, physics and more!

When you get to the site, you may be overwhelmed with all of the fun choices. Explore some of the following fields of science: 

  • Archaeology – See if you can find the lost Spanish mission.
  • Astronomy – Go on a solar system scavenger hunt.
  • Biodiversity – Play a game to learn about the plants and animals in an African rain forest.
  • Earth – Grow rock candy and meet some geologists.
  • Genetics – Become a DNA detective or take a mystery photo challenge.
  • Marine Biology – Journey to deep sea vents.
  • Paleontology – Meet T. Rex and the strange members of his family tree.
  • Physics – Learn more about Albert Einstein.
  • Water – Solve story puzzles to find out how things live in the Arctic.

And more!

You can also explore by activity: games, stories, hands-on activities and videos. There are many engaging educational games and activities on this site to bring out the “Ologist” in you!

And back on the home page, the “Find Stuff to See and Do” link will bring you to the list of programs found at the museum.

Calendars through the Ages

January 10th, 2019

 

It’s Thursday, January 10, 2019, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Calendars through the Ages

(www.webexhibits.org/calendars/index.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Part of the larger WebExhibits online museum from the Institute for Dynamic Educational Advancement, this website examines the origins and history of calendars.

When arriving at today’s link, use the upper menu to decide what topic you would like to explore: 

  • Years & Months – Learn about the astronomical events on which a calendar is based then use the sidebar menu to dig deeper into the astronomy of calendars, see a perpetual calendar, the phases of the moon within a given month, the history of our calendar, terms used, and more.
  • Various Calendars – Discover the differences in the Gregorian calendar (which most of us use) and the Chinese, Christian, Indian, Islamic, Jewish, Mayan, Roman, and other calendars past, present, and future.
  • Our Week – How did the 7-day week come to be? Where did the names of the days come from? What other connotations are associated with the days of the week? These questions and more are answered in this topic.
  • Timeline – Not your typical history timeline, this is a timeline of interesting calendar facts.

Visitors will also notice on the main menu “Node View. From here you can navigate through a cloud map of the site to narrow your research.

With a new year upon us, this website provides an interesting look into the passing of time and a unique history study unit.

Math Biographies, History, & More!

November 5th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, November 5, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

MacTutor History of Math Archive

(www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/index.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website archives the biographies of famous and not-so-famous mathematicians, including a “Mathematicians of the Day” feature. It also maintains an index of the history of various math strands like Numbers, Algebra, and Geometry, as well as the history of math in various cultures such as those in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, China, India, America and more.

When you get to the site, simply use the search tool or the menu on the left of the screen to access: 

  • Biographies Index – Read the life stories of mathematicians through the ages. Search for names alphabetically, or search various time periods from 500 AD to the present.
  • History Topics Index – Click on links to learn about mathematics in various cultures from Ancient Babylonia to the Mayan culture to present day America. You can also learn the history of various mathematical topics such as Algebra, Analysis, Numbers, Number Theory, Geometry, Topology, Mathematical Physics, Mathematical Astronomy, and more.
  • Famous Curves Index – Learn the history of various math curves such as the Cartesian Oval, Devil’s Curve, Fermat’s Spiral, Involute of a Circle, Newton’s Parabolas, Serpentine, Talbot’s Curve, Watt’s Curve, the Witch of Agnesi, and more.
  • Mathematicians of the Day – Find out which mathematicians were born (and who died) every day of the year. Bookmark the site, and check it daily. The entire year is archived here – look up your birthday and see what mathematician was born on the same day as you!

This site offers a unique way to engage students in the study of mathematics, and a way to further explore math for those who simply can’t get enough of it.

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