Archive for the ‘social sciences’ category

American History Videos, Games, & Timelines

June 27th, 2019

 

It’s Thursday, June 27, 2019, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Have Fun with History

(www.havefunwithhistory.com/)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 4 and up; children with parental supervision; younger children may enjoy aspects of the site)

 

This ad-supported website provides free videos, interactive games and activities, history timelines, and links to many other resources to bring history alive “for students, educators and all lovers of American History.”

When you get to the website you’ll see some features and highlights. First check out: 

  • History Movies – Watch video recordings by news reporters and eye-witnesses, as well as animations, documentaries, and films of people and events that shaped American history. Selections range from the 1895 Edison experimental talking movie to educational films from the 1950s. You’ll also find  history-themed television dramas, modern well-made documentaries, and even Hollywood movies.
  • Activities – Enjoy fun interactive games that teach about history while they entertain. Some games are hosted on the site, and some games are hosted on other websites. Topics include: 
    • The Boston Tea Party
    • Presidential Turkeys
    • Jamestown Online Adventure
    • Animated Atlas
    • Lewis & Clark Expedition Game

Then below the featured video, choose from: 

  • History Topics – Explore videos by topic including: 
    • Colonial America
    • Revolutionary War
    • Civil War
    • Pioneers & The Frontier
    • World War I
    • Great Depression
    • World War II
    • Space Race
    • Native Americans
    • African American
    • And many more!
  • People Timeline
  • Events Timeline
  • History in a Minute

This is a great resource for supplementing any study of history, or exploring your interest in various historical eras.

Learn about the Silver Rush of 1903

June 20th, 2019

 

It’s Thursday, June 20, 2019, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Cobalt Adventure

(www.virtualmuseum.ca/sgc-cms/expositions-exhibitions/cobalt/en/index.php)

Age Range: 9-14 (Grades 5-8 approximately, with parental supervision. People of all ages may enjoy aspects of this site.)

 

At this website you can virtually experience an early 20th century Silver Rush through interactive games and lessons that teach social studies, history and geography.

When you get to the site, you’ll see a menu that includes: 

  • The Game – Select one of three real-life characters (an old prospector, a nurse, or a young shopkeeper) and head to Cobalt in Ontario, Canada to join the Silver Rush of 1903. This multimedia adventure (available in Flash or HTML) is different for each character, and there are 28 possible endings. After you’ve seen the results of any one decision you make for your character, you can choose “previous” to go back and choose again. At the end of each playthrough, you can click on “Actual Factual” to see what actually happened to the person you chose to be, plus plenty of other information about life in Cobalt at that time. (From the “Library” on the menu, all of the Actual Factuals are available; during gameplay, only the information pertinent to your most recent decision is available.)
  • Curriculum – Get four downloadable (pdf) lessons with ideas and activities designed to enhance what you learn from playing the game. Create a facsimile of a hand-colored postcard, write your own adventure story, use visual prompts to tell a story.
  • Library – Explore a photo gallery and view a collection of artifacts from the Cobalt Mining Museum that were used to create the multimedia game.

This game is available in English or French. If you want to view it in French, click “Francais” at the top of the home page.

Have Fun Tracking Money

June 6th, 2019

 

It’s Thursday, June 6, 2019, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Where’s George

(www.wheresgeorge.com/)

Age Range: 6-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers a way to track a U.S. dollar bill to see where it’s been – what a great way to tie in social studies with math! We were required to register (free) in order to access the site.

Once you’re there, just enter the denomination, series, and serial number of any U.S. dollar bill, along with your current U.S. zip code in the form on the homepage.

A “Bill Tracker Report” will be generated explaining where your bill has been, how far it has traveled, how long it’s been in circulation, and you can even read comments from people explaining where they got the bill before using it or passing it along to someone else.

But that’s not all! Using the “Tools/Fun” item on the menu at the top of the page, click on “Cool Links About Money.” A new page opens with links to the BEST MONEY WEBSITES where you can learn all about the history of U.S. currency, design features, and even security measures to deter counterfeiting. You’ll also find links where you can track bills from various countries in Europe, as well as currency from India, Africa, China, Japan, and New Zealand.

If you are from Canada, be sure to check out Where’s Willy” to track Canadian currency! (By the way, for those who don’t know, “Willy” refers to Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the first French Canadian Prime Minister.)

Learn Civics with Fun and Games

May 30th, 2019

 

It’s Thursday, May 30, 2019, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

iCivics

(www.icivics.org/)

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 4-12 approximately, with parental supervision)

 

Bookmark this site now! It’s a fun, interactive gateway into the realm of Civics! The brainchild of former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, this free education project teaches students about civics through engaging computer games in which the student “wins” by mastering knowledge of the U.S. Constitution and essential foundational principles of the nation.

From the home page, select the large green “teach” image, then select “all games” on the next page. Some of the featured games include: 

  • Do I Have a Right? – Run your own firm of lawyers who specialize in constitutional law or the Bill of Rights.
  • Argument Wars – Put your lawyering skills to the test by arguing real Supreme Court cases.
  • LawCraft – Become a virtual legislator and try to meet the needs of your constituents. Find out what members of Congress must do to prepare, write, pass, and enact laws.
  • Executive Command – Find out what it’s like to be a U.S. President over a 4-year term of office.

Also, play games that teach about immigration, citizenship, voting and more.

In addition to the multi-media games and web quests, you’ll find lesson plans and handouts for teachers and parents that go with the games to enhance learning.

Serious Science Projects for K-12

May 28th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, May 28, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Science Buddies

(www.sciencebuddies.org/)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

This non-profit foundation’s website provides free science project ideas, instructions, explanations, and assistance “for serious students” to build their literacy in science and technology in the 21st century.

You’ll find free projects and activities in all areas of science including: 

  • Physical Science
  • Life Science
  • Earth & Environmental Science
  • Math & Computer Science
  • Engineering
  • Behavioral & Social Sciences

You’ll even find science projects that cover cooking, food, music, photography, videos, computer games, and sports.

Science Buddies aims to reduce the hassle of hands-on scientific investigations while encouraging fun, intellectually-stimulating and cutting-edge science education. When you get to the site you’ll see a menu that includes: 

  • Science Projects – Over 1,200 scientist-outlined projects in 30 different fields of science and engineering. Plus you can use the “Topic Selection Wizard” to find a project that matches your student’s unique interests!
  • Project Guides – Not sure how to proceed? This section includes step-by-step guidance about the scientific method, research, constructing and testing a hypothesis, analyzing data, drawing a conclusion, and communicating results.
  • Ask an Expert – Get online advice in a forum with scientists and engineers.
  • Science Careers – Discover how the science in a student’s project is used in real-world careers.
  • Teachers/Parents/Students – Find resources, enrichment tools, and tips for success.

This is an amazing resource for science discovery and exploration. Bookmark it to return often.

Geography with Google’s My Maps

May 23rd, 2019

 

It’s Thursday, May 23, 2019, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Google’s My Maps

(www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/?hl=en)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

If you’ve ever visited Google Maps (or MapQuest or Yahoo Maps), you know that you can pan and zoom a world map from your computer. But did you know you can customize that map for your homeschooling?

My Maps requires a free Google account. The beauty of My Maps is: 

  • It’s free.
  • It’s easy.
  • Google stores it for you and provides a web address (a URL) so that you can share your map with friends or family.

When you get to the site, click the “Create New Map” button. (If you don’t have a Google account, it will prompt you to sign up.)

Here’s how it works: Once the map comes up, use the features on the map’s menu to customize it by adding colored pins and labels to it, draw lines on it, or even insert pictures. (Here’s a link to My Maps Help with more details on how to use the features.)

My Maps was very helpful last summer with information about specific California wildfires. The fire map also included info about air quality, evacuation orders, shelters, fire containment statistics, road closures, and more.

Once we started thinking about My Maps for homeschooling, the possibilities seemed endless: 

  • Label a map with events from your history studies.
  • Use the map as a quiz by putting questions onto it.
  • Share the map with other families in a reading group. When children complete a book, let them add a pin to the map indicating where the author was from or where the story took place.
  • Help young children trace routes to the grocery store or to Grandma’s house.
  • Use it as a diary for a family vacation.

And more!

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