Archive for the ‘social sciences’ category

97 Orchard Street National Historical Site-UPDATED

October 22nd, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, October 22, 2020, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Tenement Museum

(www.tenement.org/explore/behind-the-scene/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Step back in time and explore a historical New York’s Lower East Side tenement and discover life living in the 97 Orchard Street tenement during the 1800s and 1900s.

When arriving at the site, scroll down to read about the “people, objects, and traditions that shaped the fabric of everyday life in New York City tenements.” Some of the articles include: 

  • Why 97 Orchard Street?
  • History by Numbers
  • Fanny Rogarshevsky’s Toolbox
  • Rosaria Baldizzi: A Complicated Path to Citizenship
  • Precision and Spirit: Fighting for a Place in America
  • And more

When you are done exploring, select the “Learn” tab from the top menu to find lesson plans, teacher resources, and more.

When you have finished visiting this website, hop on over to New York’s PBS station Thirteen Lower East Side Tenement Museum website for more insight into what the tenement on 97 Orchard Street might have looked like in 1870 and 1915 as well as learn some interesting history about some of the tenants. When arriving at the link, select from the following: 

  • Urban Log Cabin – Using the images of the tenement from 1870 or 1915, select a room to view what the apartment looked like during the time period and learn a little bit about the folks that lived there.
  • Excavation – 97 Orchard Street was boarded up from 1935-1987. Learn what was found when it was opened again. Examine the 13 layers of wallpaper found on one wall and check out 10 objects found during renovation.
  • Tenement VR – Take virtual tours of the Gumpertz Apartment (1870’s) and the Baldizzi Apartment (1935) as they might have appeared when the families were living in them. Don’t forget to learn about the families by clicking on the text links.
  • History – Read a brief history of the tenement and tenement life as well as the changes required through time. Click on the images at the top to see actual pictures of tenement life in the 30’s and 40’s.

These websites provide an excellent opportunity to learn about immigration and tenement life in New York’s Lower East Side.

97 Orchard Street National Historical Site

October 22nd, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, October 22, 2020, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Tenement Museum

(www.tenement.org/explore/behind-the-scene/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

This website CHANGE THIS some terrific science lessons, activities and tools. It will also inspire scientific curiosity – not only for kids, but even for parents who aren’t keen in science.

When arriving at the site, scroll down to read about the “people, objects, and traditions that shaped the fabric of everyday life in New York City tenements.” Some of the articles include: 

  • Why 97 Orchard Street?
  • History by Numbers
  • Fanny Rogarshevsky’s Toolbox
  • Rosaria Baldizzi: A Complicated Path to Citizenship
  • Precision and Spirit: Fighting for a Place in America
  • And more

When you are done exploring, select the “Learn” tab from the top menu to find lesson plans, teacher resources, and more.

When you have finished visiting this website, hop on over to New York’s PBS station Thirteen Lower East Side Tenement Museum website for more insight into what the tenement on 97 Orchard Street might have looked like in 1870 and 1915 as well as learn some interesting history about some of the tenants. When arriving at the link, select from the following: 

  • Urban Log Cabin – Using the images of the tenement from 1870 or 1915, select a room to view what the apartment looked like during the time period and learn a little bit about the folks that lived there.
  • Excavation – 97 Orchard Street was boarded up from 1935-1987. Learn what was found when it was opened again. Examine the 13 layers of wallpaper found on one wall and check out 10 objects found during renovation.
  • Tenement VR – Take virtual tours of the Gumpertz Apartment (1870’s) and the Baldizzi Apartment (1935) as they might have appeared when the families were living in them. Don’t forget to learn about the families by clicking on the text links.
  • History – Read a brief history of the tenement and tenement life as well as the changes required through time. Click on the images at the top to see actual pictures of tenement life in the 30’s and 40’s.

These websites provide an excellent opportunity to learn about immigration and tenement life in New York’s Lower East Side.

Discover our Centennial President – Benjamin Harrison

October 15th, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, October 15, 2020, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site

(bhpsite.org/learn/benjamin-harrison/)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Visit today’s website to learn all about our 23rd president, also known as the centennial president because he was inaugurated 100 years after George Washington.

Born August 20, 1833, Benjamin Harrison came from a long line of famous politicians. Great-grandson of founding father and signer of the Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Harrison V, and grandson of our 9th president, William Henry Harrison, a.k.a. “Old Tippecanoe”, he had big shoes to fill. Using the links on the left hand side bar, dig into the life and times of Benjamin Harrison and discover: 

  • The early years
  • His Civil War service
  • His life as a lawyer
  • His presidency
  • His wives
  • And more

Along with concise articles and interesting image galleries, there is a brief audio recording of the president and a quick virtual tour of his home on Delaware Street in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Add this website to your list for presidential studies.

Games That Teach Global Issues to Youth

October 8th, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, October 8, 2020, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Global Social Sciences Games

(www.tigweb.org/games/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12 approximately, with parental preview and supervision)

 

This website offers an assortment of free, interactive, educational games to inform youth about global social and political issues and methods for implementing “a more inclusive, peaceful and sustainable world.”

The games require good reading and comprehension skills. The global issues touched upon in the games include: education, environment, globalization, health, human rights, peace and conflict, and more.

TakingITGlobal was started by two teenagers in 1999 and now receives funding and support from a variety of foundations and companies including Microsoft, the Staples Foundation, and the UN Foundation among others. We mention this because it’s relevant to understanding the philosophical and political point of view behind the activities and games offered at the site. Parents should preview the site to determine suitability of content.

That said, when you get to the site you’ll find a selection of games. Here are the descriptions from the website: 

  • Butt Out: Tobacco Trivia – Test your knowledge about tobacco while playing our Tobacco Card Game!
  • Geography Genius: Flags of the World – Learn more about the world as you guess countries based on flags, shapes, and statistics!
  • GRUB: Food Bytes – Do you hunger for information about food choices and food systems? Use your noodle to match the cards and answer trivia questions, and watch your score mushroom!
  • Orange Revolution – The Orange Revolution grabbed the world’s headlines in late 2004 and early 2005 as the results of the Ukrainian presidential election were contested by the leading candidates. Can you maintain order and peace, or will your decisions cause thousands of protestors to revolt?
  • Ayiti: The Cost of Life – A role-playing video game in which the player assumes the roles of family members living in rural Haiti. Over the course of the game, the player must choose among and balance various goals, such as achieving education, making money, staying healthy, and maintaining happiness while encountering unexpected events.
  • And so many more!

When you’re through playing the games, use the menu to explore this expansive site. The mission of TIG is to help youth worldwide become informed, inspired, and involved.

Again, some of the games contain controversial subject matter, therefore, parents (as always) should preview the games and supervise Internet access.

Learning Fun with World Geography Games

October 1st, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, October 1, 2020, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

World Geography Games

(world-geography-games.com/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12 with parental supervision)

 

Add some fun to your world geography studies with the help of this website.

When you get to the site, choose from: 

  • World Games
  • Africa Games
  • Americas Games
  • Asia Games
  • Australia & Oceania Games
  • Europe Games

Using colorful maps, students are asked to identify countries, states, cities, and more by clicking on the appropriate location or answer. Points are earned with each correct answer and it keeps track of how many tries it took to find the right place. There is a “give up?” option which, when selected, fills in all of the information on the map. If your student is new to the subject, we suggest selecting that option at the beginning to use as a study tool before playing the game. When the student thinks that they are ready, they can select the “play again” option. 


Game topics include:

  • Countries
  • Capitals
  • Flags
  • And more

This site provides excellent geography practice and is simple to navigate and play the games.

State Symbols Made Easy

September 17th, 2020

 

It’s Thursday, September 17, 2020, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

State Symbols USA

(statesymbolsusa.org/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

If you are looking for an all-in-one website to concisely

learn about state symbols, icons, mottoes, landmarks, and much more, then today’s website is the site for you.

After arriving at the link, there are few ways to explore the site: 

  • Use the clickable state map at the center of the page to select a state.
  • Use the left hand side bar menu of the state names.
  • Use the right hand side bar menu to search for specific types of state symbols and icons.
  • Scroll down below the map and click on the images of specific categories such as capitals, coat of arms, flags, historic and iconic figures, holidays and events, museums, name origins, tartans, threatened species, and much, much more.
  • The upper menu on any page contains links to get back to the home page, search by state symbols, places and even includes a whole section for national symbols.

If you select to research by state, after selecting the state, when the page loads there will be images of the various symbols and facts relating to the state. Select your topic of interest and discover a brief overview. Or you can use the sub-menu located above the images across the top to search for related information based on: 

  • Symbols & Icons
  • Cities & Towns
  • Parks
  • Landmarks
  • Historical Markers

Navigating this ad-supported website with so many options makes short work of searching for specific information and the succinct text keeps even the most reluctant student interested. This is one website you will want to bookmark for all of your state study adventures.

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