Archive for the ‘history’ category

Free Art Lessons!

September 26th, 2020

 

It’s Saturday, September 26, 2020, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Deep Space Sparkle Art

(www.deepspacesparkle.com/age-grade-levels/)

Age Range: 5-11 (Grades K-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers free art lessons including complete instructions and helpful tips.

The site was designed by an art teacher in Santa Barbara, California, who named the site after her favorite Crayola crayon color. She thinks that art should be a part of every child’s day. The lessons are themed around different animals, architecture, cultures, and geography, and many are inspired by children’s picture books.

When you get to the site, choose the grade level you are interested in. Click on any lesson title and a new page opens with complete instructions, illustrations, and photos and even videos. The lessons can be easily adapted to suit kids of all ages. In fact, the whole family may enjoy doing these activities together.

Then use the menu on the left to find:  

  • 45-minute art lessons
  • Art at Home
  • Art History Curriculum
  • Art Lessons by Subject
  • Art Lessons by Technique
  • Art Shows
  • How to Teach Art
  • and more!

While most of the information is geared for classroom teachers, it can be easily tweaked for use at home.

Energy Lessons, Printables, & Activities for K-12

September 8th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, September 8, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Energy Kids

(www.eia.gov/kids/for-teachers/)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website, sponsored by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, provides free energy-related lessons, printables, games, and activities designed for classroom use in grades K-12. (They can be tweaked for use in the homeschool environment.)

When you get to the website you’ll see a menu under the banner “For Teachers” that includes: 

  • Lesson Plans for Primary (K-3), Elementary (4-7), Intermediate (6-9), and Secondary (9-12)
  • Teacher Guide with tips on extension activities
  • Career Corner to explore jobs in the Energy field
  • Science Fair Experiments
  • Field Trips with ideas for taking trips to power plants, etc.
  • Related Links to resources and energy websites

Once you’ve explored the “For Teachers” section check out the menu in the left margin of the page that offers: 

  • What is Energy? – Learn energy basics including its forms, how it’s measured, and what it has to do with the periodic table of elements.
  • Energy Sources – Discover renewable and non-renewable energy, electricity, hydrogen, and the latest energy stats.
  • Using & Saving Energy – Learn how energy is used at home, work, in industry, transportation, and more.
  • History of Energy – Check out the time line of energy inventions including Coal, Electricity, Ethanol, Geothermal, Hydropower, Natural Gas, Oil, Wind, and more. You can also read biographies of people who developed scientific breakthroughs with energy including Celsius, Curie, Edison, Einstein, Faraday, Joule, Marconi, Newton, Oppenheimer and more.
  • Games & Activities – Enjoy riddles, puzzles, science experiments, and take a quiz to test your energy IQ.

There’s also a link to Energy Calculators and a Glossary.

Trick Photography Explained

September 5th, 2020

 

It’s Saturday, September 5, 2020, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The American Museum of Photography – Photographic Fictions

(www.photographymuseum.com/photographicfictions.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Explore the history of trick photography with this website from The American Museum of Photography. The museum offers an exhibit called “Photographic Fictions: How The Camera Learned To Lie” that documents the history of how photographers used the camera to create pictures that tampered with reality. This online exhibit is really a companion to a book by the same title.

The exhibit is set up like a book – you simply click your way through the chapter pages to see great pictures and read text that illustrates the progress of trick photography from altered daguerreotypes to composite photographs designed to fool the eye. When you get to the site you will see a menu that includes: 

  • Introduction: Tampering With Perfection – Find out how early photographers used embellishment to improve upon reality.
  • Montages, Multiples & Mischief – Discover the secrets of double exposures and the art of creating photomontages.
  • Do You Believe? Spirit Photography, 1868-1935 – In early photography a person who moved out of camera range after only a portion of the exposure was completed would appear as a see-through blur or a “ghost.” One photographer claimed he had taken actual photographs of ghosts, starting a fad of spirit photography and a scientific controversy that lasted well into the 20th century. See the images and read the story in this section.
  • Seeing Double: Creating Clones With a Camera – In the 1860s, photographers developed techniques to duplicate people – causing them to appear twice in the same photograph. These double-exposure novelties were popular for more than three decades.
  • Faux Snow: Climate Change In the Studio – See how photographers created winter climate conditions in their studios.
  • “Did You Ever Have a Dream Like This?” – Check out the home-grown surrealism of trick photographer “Dad” Martin.

This online exhibit provides a really fascinating peak at the development of an art form of illusion. It makes one question the belief that “the camera doesn’t lie.”

Note: Today’s featured website houses other exhibits by the American Museum of Photography as well. We have not previewed the other exhibits, so our suggestion (as always) is for parents to review the content for suitability before sharing it with your children.

[ClickSchooling] ThoughtCo. – Language Learning Resources

May 23rd, 2020

 

It’s Saturday, May 23, 2020, and time for Foreign Languages at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

ThoughtCo. – Language Learning Resources

(www.thoughtco.com/languages-4133094)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

This site has a ton of resources “for both students and teachers of second languages, from basic vocabulary and grammar guides to advanced writing and conversation exercises.”

When you get to the website, choose from: 

  • English as a Second Language
  • Spanish
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Mandarin
  • Russian

You can read articles on history and culture, essential vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and so much more! There are even some teacher resourses like lesson plans under English as a Second Language and worksheets under French.

Free Educational Video Shows

March 10th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, March 10, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Science Trek

(sciencetrek.org/)

Age Range: 6-12 (Grades 1-6, with parental supervision)

 

Idaho Public Television sponsors this site that provides archives of free educational video shows and compatible resources to help kids learn about history and science.

When you get to the site, you’ll see the featured video, currently Geology. Then use the right hand menu to view topics such as: 

  • Ages Past
  • Animals
  • Earth Science
  • Environment
  • Human Body
  • Science Fundamentals
  • Space
  • Technology
  • And more!

Click on any topic and a new page opens where you can watch or download the full show, or a short video clip. Be sure to click on the tabs at the top of the page to access terrific facts, links to further learning, games, resources for teachers and more.

Learn to Speak the Sauk Language

February 8th, 2020

 

It’s Saturday, February 8, 2020, and time for Foreign Languages at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Talk Sauk

(www.talksauk.com/#/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Discover the traditional language of the Sac and Fox Indian Nation of Oklahoma with this website. Derived from the Algonquian language family, the Sauk language is currently only spoken by a handful of elders. The Sauk Language department created this website to help “keep the Sauk language as a living and integral component of the Sac and Fox Nation”.

When arriving at the colorful website, select the “Menu” option in the upper left to expose the menu and find: 

  • About – Learn more about the Sauk Nation’s history and more
  • Dictionary – Use the visual dictionary to learn the Sauk language word for animals, food, numbers and other everyday words. Click an image to hear the word in the Sauk language.
  • Phrases – Read phrases in English related to colors, days, weather, eating, greetings, feelings, and much more, then click the phrase to hear it in the Sauk language.
  • Games – Play matching games, enjoy the online or downloadable coloring book, or explore the online games of Sauk Count and Climb and Sauk Drop and Catch (NOTE: We could not get these 2 games to load for us.)
  • Storybooks – Read and listen to “Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed”, see the Eric Carle book, Brown Bear, Brown Bear translated into Sauk and the story “Kâta Kîshkô”.
  • Videos – Watch animated stories, see videos about the Sauk language, and learn to count to 10.
  • And more!

Visitors do not need to be part of the Sac and Fox Nation to appreciate the value and beauty of the language. This website provides a wonderful introduction to the Sauk language and students may be inspired to dig deeper into the language of their own heritage.

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