Archive for the ‘history’ category

All About Energy for K-12!

June 28th, 2022

It’s Tuesday, June 28, 2022, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

U.S. Energy Information Administration: Energy Kids

(www.eia.gov/kids/for-teachers/)

Grades K-12, with parental supervision

This website, sponsored by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, provides free energy-related lessons, printables, games, and activities designed for classroom use in grades K-12. (They can be tweaked for use in the homeschool environment.)

When you get to the website you’ll see a menu under the banner “For Teachers” that includes:

  • Lesson Plans for Primary (K-3), Elementary (4-7), Intermediate (6-9), and Secondary (9-12)
  • Teacher Guide with tips on extension activities
  • Career Corner to explore jobs in the Energy field
  • Science Fair Experiments
  • Field Trips with ideas for taking trips to power plants, etc.
  • Related Links to resources and energy websites

Once you’ve explored the “For Teachers” section check out the menu in the left margin of the page that offers:

  • What is Energy? – Learn energy basics including its forms, how it’s measured, and what it has to do with the periodic table of elements.
  • Energy Sources – Discover renewable and non-renewable energy, electricity, hydrogen, and the latest energy stats.
  • Using & Saving Energy – Learn how energy is used at home, work, in industry, transportation, and more.
  • History of Energy – Check out the timeline of energy inventions including Coal, Electricity, Ethanol, Geothermal, Hydropower, Natural Gas, Oil, Wind, and more. You can also read biographies of people who developed scientific breakthroughs with energy including Celsius, Curie, Edison, Einstein, Faraday, Joule, Marconi, Newton, Oppenheimer, and more.
  • Games & Activities – Enjoy riddles, puzzles, science experiments, and take a quiz to test your energy IQ.

There’s also a link to Energy Calculators and a Glossary. 

Listen to Archived History Broadcasts

June 3rd, 2021

The Internet Archive: You Are There

(archive.org/details/You_Are_There_OTR)

All grades; children with parental supervision

Family members of all ages can enjoy listening to these archived broadcasts of the “You Are There” radio program, but older students may have a better level of comprehension and retention.

“You Are There” is a series of about seven dozen or so radio broadcasts that aired from 1947 to 1950, each about half an hour long. More than 70 episodes are archived. Each episode is a fictional news report “live from the scene” of an important event in history.

As the reporter conducts interviews with famous people (and not-so-famous people) and you hear realistic sound effects, you can imagine that you have been transported back in time – and history is unfolding right before your very ears.

  • Listen in as Julius Caesar, Socrates, Captain Kidd, Maximilian, Joan of Arc, John Wilkes Booth, and others meet their end.
  • Re-live the famous battle at Thermopylae, the Alamo, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the storming of the Bastille, the battle of Gettysburg, the battle of Hastings, the fall of Troy, the defeat of Sitting Bull, and other exciting conflicts.
  • Witness the rise and fall of great leaders, the signing of pivotal documents and treaties, and important uprisings, trials, and discoveries.

Archive.org makes all of this available for free. When you reach this site, you may wish to wait a little while for the main page to load completely; a gray audio player appears near at the top of the playlist of the screen. You can click on any title to play it directly from your browser.

In addition to legally and freely listening to these broadcasts online, you can also right-click on the titles to download them to your computer for listening later, then load them onto any device that plays mp3’s.

Cozy up on the couch with the family for a delightful listening adventure or listen as you travel away from home.

Discovery the History of Colorado

May 27th, 2021

UNCO – Doing History, Keeping the Past

(www.unco.edu/hewit/doing-history/)

Grades 3-8, with parental supervision

Discover the history of Colorado with this website from the University of Northern Colorado.

When arriving at today’s link use the menu under the header to begin exploring:

  • Indians
  • Trappers & Traders
  • Miners
  • Farmers & Ranchers
  • Cities
  • 20th Century Colorado
  • Virtual Field Trips

Each topic is further broken down into sub-sections focusing on the people, places, lifestyles, occupations, and more. Each section provides textural information along with images and relevant quotes.

A nice feature of these units is there is a downloadable PDF available of the section that you can take along with you when you are offline. From the “Home” page, select the “Teacher Resources” link under the welcome section to locate downloadable Word documents of lesson plans and activities as well as other online resources.

This site would make a good addition to your Colorado state studies.

Pong, Pac-Man, Minecraft and More Historic Games

May 6th, 2021

The Stong: Video Game History

(www.museumofplay.org/about/icheg/video-game-history)

Grades 4 and up, with parental supervision

The International Center for the History of Electronic Games is part of The Strong – a museum in Rochester, New York. ICHEG “collects, studies, and interprets video games, other electronic games, and related materials and the ways in which electronic games are changing how people play, learn, and connect with each other, including across boundaries of culture and geography.”

When you get to the site, you can explore:

  • Game History
  • Video Game History Timeline
  • Key Moments in Video Game History PDF
  • Interpreting the History of Electronic Games
  • The timeline has the history of electronic games and delivery systems from the 1940s to the 2010s including:
  • Pong
  • Space Invaders
  • Pac-Man
  • Donkey Kong
  • Sonic the Hedgehog
  • Play Station
  • The Sims
  • Nintendo Wii
  • Minecraft
  • and more!

Just click on each decade in the timeline to learn about legendary games and game systems, along with their inventors including Will Wright, Ralph Baer, Don Daglow, and others. You’ll enjoy a brief textual history along with photographs.

When you’re through with the timeline, check out other parts of The Strong: the National Toy Hall of Fame, the World Video Game Hall of Fame, and more! The gamers in your home are sure to want to take a field trip or family vacation to experience this museum in real-time.

Learn about Alaska

April 22nd, 2021

AlaskaKids

(www.alaskakids.org/index.cfm)

Grades 1-8, with parental supervision

 

While this website is still under construction, there is a lot of great information and activities for kids to learn about Alaska on this website from the University of Alaska.

When arriving at the home page, either use the graphic or the sidebar menu to navigate to: 

  • Cool Critters – Learn all about the animals that make Alaska their home.
  • Know Alaska – Discover quick facts about Alaska, its geography, and history.
  • Get Active – Check out all the different sports that are played in Alaska then take a Fact or Fiction quiz about fitness.
  • Lit Kids – Discover books with an Alaskan setting.

(Love the Arts and We’re Cooking are still under construction and the Fun and Games section is no longer working.)

When you are finished exploring this website geared towards kids, click the LiteSite.org link in the lower-left corner, then select the “Teaching & Learning” link for teacher, parent, and student activities to add to your studies.

History Lessons with Primary Sources

April 15th, 2021

DocsTeach

(www.docsteach.org/)

All grades, with parental supervision

 

This mobile friendly website provides access to thousands of primary resources from the National Archives to use throughout your history studies.

In addition to this, this site also provides activity lessons, guides to using primary resources, and much more. If you would like to save and share primary resources and create your own activities as well as gain access to hundreds of more educator-created activities, you can register on the site for a free account.

To begin looking for resources, when you arrive at the home page, scroll a little to find the bar with three selection options: 

  • Explore – Use the keyword search engine to search the primary source database or browse by time period or document type including textual document, photograph, video, audio, artwork and artifacts, or poster.
  • Discover – Locate created activities and lessons similarly to searching for a source but visitors can further refine search results to grade level, thinking skill, and activity type.
  • Create – In order to create an activity or lesson, you will need to register for a free account. Once this is done, use the tool to make your own lessons, add elements, create instructions for students and teachers, and much more. There is a functionality to share your lessons with your students and others as well as have students email you their responses to questions and view those responses in a log in your account. This is a powerful tool for creating your own activities to use in your classroom.

This website provides many of the tools, instruction, and resources you might need to have to use primary resources in your classroom.

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