Archive for the ‘history’ category

[ClickSchooling] ThoughtCo. – Language Learning Resources

May 23rd, 2020

 

It’s Saturday, May 23, 2020, and time for Foreign Languages at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

ThoughtCo. – Language Learning Resources

(www.thoughtco.com/languages-4133094)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

This site has a ton of resources “for both students and teachers of second languages, from basic vocabulary and grammar guides to advanced writing and conversation exercises.”

When you get to the website, choose from: 

  • English as a Second Language
  • Spanish
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Mandarin
  • Russian

You can read articles on history and culture, essential vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and so much more! There are even some teacher resourses like lesson plans under English as a Second Language and worksheets under French.

Free Educational Video Shows

March 10th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, March 10, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Science Trek

(sciencetrek.org/)

Age Range: 6-12 (Grades 1-6, with parental supervision)

 

Idaho Public Television sponsors this site that provides archives of free educational video shows and compatible resources to help kids learn about history and science.

When you get to the site, you’ll see the featured video, currently Geology. Then use the right hand menu to view topics such as: 

  • Ages Past
  • Animals
  • Earth Science
  • Environment
  • Human Body
  • Science Fundamentals
  • Space
  • Technology
  • And more!

Click on any topic and a new page opens where you can watch or download the full show, or a short video clip. Be sure to click on the tabs at the top of the page to access terrific facts, links to further learning, games, resources for teachers and more.

Learn to Speak the Sauk Language

February 8th, 2020

 

It’s Saturday, February 8, 2020, and time for Foreign Languages at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Talk Sauk

(www.talksauk.com/#/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Discover the traditional language of the Sac and Fox Indian Nation of Oklahoma with this website. Derived from the Algonquian language family, the Sauk language is currently only spoken by a handful of elders. The Sauk Language department created this website to help “keep the Sauk language as a living and integral component of the Sac and Fox Nation”.

When arriving at the colorful website, select the “Menu” option in the upper left to expose the menu and find: 

  • About – Learn more about the Sauk Nation’s history and more
  • Dictionary – Use the visual dictionary to learn the Sauk language word for animals, food, numbers and other everyday words. Click an image to hear the word in the Sauk language.
  • Phrases – Read phrases in English related to colors, days, weather, eating, greetings, feelings, and much more, then click the phrase to hear it in the Sauk language.
  • Games – Play matching games, enjoy the online or downloadable coloring book, or explore the online games of Sauk Count and Climb and Sauk Drop and Catch (NOTE: We could not get these 2 games to load for us.)
  • Storybooks – Read and listen to “Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed”, see the Eric Carle book, Brown Bear, Brown Bear translated into Sauk and the story “Kâta Kîshkô”.
  • Videos – Watch animated stories, see videos about the Sauk language, and learn to count to 10.
  • And more!

Visitors do not need to be part of the Sac and Fox Nation to appreciate the value and beauty of the language. This website provides a wonderful introduction to the Sauk language and students may be inspired to dig deeper into the language of their own heritage.

The 60+ Symbols of Astronomy & Physics

January 28th, 2020

 

It’s Tuesday, January 28, 2020, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Sixty Symbols

(www.sixtysymbols.com/index.html)

Age Range: 6-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

This fantastic website offers FREE videos about physics and astronomy featuring experts from The University of Nottingham, who explain the strange letters and squiggles (many more than 60 of them) used by scientists.

As explained at the website, “Sixty Symbols is a collection of videos by experts from The University of Nottingham. It’s worth noting many symbols have multiple uses across scientific disciplines and we sometimes tackle them from an unexpected viewpoint.” Here’s some of what you’ll see: 

  • Click on “E” for energy and see an Einstein doll on a swing as a demonstration of potential and kinetic energy.
  • Click on the symbol for the planet Venus (looks like a hand mirror) and learn all about it. You’ll also learn the history of the symbol and its use as the universal symbol for women.
  • What has a symbol of a cat got to do with physics? Visit the site, click on the cat and find out!

When you get to the site you’ll see the table of Sixty Symbols (and then some). Click on any one and a new page opens where a video launches that explains it. They are wonderfully engaging and educating.

Free Literature Study Guides

December 4th, 2019

 

It’s Wednesday, December 4, 2019, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Glencoe Literature Library

(www.glencoe.com/sec/literature/litlibrary/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website is a great place to get free and comprehensive literature study guides for a variety of notable books.

When you get to the site you’ll see an alphabetical menu of book titles. Simply click on the book of interest to you and a new page opens containing a brief synopsis of the book, related readings, and a link to the downloadable Study Guides (about 25-35 pages) in PDF format. Some of the book titles are: 

  • Animal Farm
  • Beowulf
  • The Call of the Wild
  • Great Expectations
  • Jane Eyre
  • Pride and Prejudice
  • The Scarlet Letter
  • To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Where the Red Fern Grows
  • and many more!

Click on the “Study Guide” and the PDF file opens (it may take a minute to fully download). The Study Guide is comprehensive for each book and includes classroom activities that can be easily tweaked for individual use including: 

  • A Focus Activity
  • Vocabulary Preview
  • Notes for Character Summarizations
  • Questions that Prompt Literature Analysis
  • Writing Assignments
  • Interdisciplinary Connections to Science, History, and Social Studies

All of this is neatly formatted so that you can print out the activity pages separately or as an entire unit. The beauty here is that you can pick and choose the items that help your students get the most out of their reading experiences.

Fun Periodic Table of Videos

October 15th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, October 15, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Periodic Videos

(www.periodicvideos.com/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

What a find! This website teaches the periodic table with videos!

When you click on an element on the periodic table, it plays a video showing educational experiments and explanations about that element. (Okay, while this site is probably designed for middle school, high school, and beyond, younger children will enjoy seeing some of the experiments. Plus, we’ve found that little kids lap up information about the Periodic Table, so don’t be shy about introducing them to it.)

This is so much fun! Each video is short (up to about 10 minutes) and provides basic information about the featured element, it’s history, and how it is used. You can tell the chemists, who narrate while demonstrating experiments with the various elements, love what they do!

Consider starting with Lithium (Li). It’s very reactive in water and the clip is fun to watch. Then try Hydrogen (H) or Helium (He) to see a big bang! (Careful – kids may be tempted to try this at home, so parental guidance and safety discussions are required.) The Phosphorus (P) video will really amaze your kids when they learn there’s about a pound of this reactive element in their bodies!

The scientists in the lab have a lot fun demonstrating the properties of the elements – and their antics with beakers, Bunsen burners, and bloopers are narrated by mild-mannered professor Martyn Poliakoff who has wonderful, wild, Einstein-ish hair! Some of his descriptions are hilarious – such as when he describes what can be done with Nitrogen (N). (Preview it, as it might alarm younger children.)

Note: We didn’t watch all of the videos. Therefore, parents AS ALWAYS should preview the videos BEFORE showing them to children to determine suitability of content.

The Periodic Table of Videos is educational, fun, and not to be missed!

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