Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Math and Computation with MIT’s “Scratch”

February 1st, 2016

 

It’s Monday, February 1, 2016, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Scratch (scratch.mit.edu/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

The good folks at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) developed this website that offers “Scratch,” a new programming language designed to help young people “create their own interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art” – and then share them on the web.

As kids (8 and up) use Scratch, they learn important mathematical and computational ideas, think creatively, analyze systematically, gain a deeper understanding of the process of design, and use technology to develop learning skills for the 21st century.

Scratch is available FREE of charge and can be downloaded for Mac OSX and Windows at the website.

According to the website, “Different people get started with Scratch in different ways. Some like to tinker with various blocks to see what they do. Others like to experiment with the sample projects that come with Scratch, and then make changes to the scripts.” The website offers clear instructions, along with suggestions for fun, initial activities.

In fact, when you get to the site, click on “Support” on the menu. A new page opens where you can access a step-by-step guide to using Scratch along with video tutorials, reference guides, and FAQs.

This is a great way to engage in math while having fun!

Lab Science Videos, Activities, Worksheets, & Games

January 12th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, January 12, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Jefferson Lab Science Series

(education.jlab.org/scienceseries/archive.html)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website is sponsored by The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The lab’s primary mission is to conduct research on the atom’s nucleus using the lab’s unique particle accelerator.

In addition to its science mission, the Lab provides programs and resources designed to help educate the public in science and technology, including a free “Science Series” of engaging lectures that are video-recorded and archived at the website for viewing. Plus, the Lab offers free learning resources including activities, worksheets, games, and more! 

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of the “Science Series” video titles including: 

  • The Origin of the Elements
  • Adventures in Infectious Diseases
  • DNA: The Strand that Connects Us All
  • Einstein for Everyone
  • Understanding Flight: A Physical Description of How Airplanes Fly
  • The Physics of Stock Car Racing
  • The Physics of Baseball
  • Comic Book Physics
  • Chemistry – It’s More Than Puffs and Bangs!
  • Radiation: What Is It and How Can It Affect Me?
  • Jellyfish: The Big Sting
  • From Acne to Suntans: Dermatology for the Teenager
  • And Many More!

Each title has a brief description and a link you can click to watch the video online.

Wait! There’s more! When you’re through watching the lectures check out the Education Home section of this site that contains free resources including hands-on activities, worksheets, puzzles and games. Look in the “Teacher Resources,” “Student Zone,” and “Games and Puzzles” sections to access all of the free science goodies.

Explore the Canon Camera Museum

January 8th, 2016

 

It’s Friday, January 8, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Canon Camera Museum

(www.canon.com/c-museum/en/)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website from Canon is an interesting walk through time for the camera enthusiast in your family.

Using the navigation at the bottom of the screen, visitors can select to explore the: 

  • Camera Hall – See and learn about Canon cameras from yesterday and today – includes not only still shot film and digital cameras but also movie cameras and camcorders.
  • Lens Hall – Examine the different camera lenses that have been available.
  • History Hall – Discover the history of Canon from 1933-2010 with a timeline that includes text, images, and video presentations. Then browse through the various awards Canon has received throughout the years.
  • Souvenir – Grab some camera-theme wallpaper for your computer.

When browsing through the Camera and Lens halls, you can search by series, period, or both. Each exhibit includes an image and specifications as well as other interesting information about the item.

Cameras have changed the way we preserve history and memories and this website helps to see how far the technology has come in such a short time.

Winter Solstice Science

December 15th, 2015

 

It’s Tuesday, December 15, 2015, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

SciJinks: What’s a Solstice

(scijinks.nasa.gov/solstice)

Age Range: 8-13 (Grades 3-8, with parental supervision)

 

The Winter Solstice will soon be here (for those in the Northern Hemisphere of planet Earth). It marks the shortest day and the longest night of the year. The winter solstice is celebrated by various cultures and religions worldwide. But what exactly is a solstice?

At this NASA-sponsored website, scientists provide an easy-to-understand explanation of the solstice complete with illustrations and photographs. This presentation includes information about: 

  • The Equator
  • Earth’s Axis of Rotation
  • Arctic Circle
  • Tropic of Cancer
  • Tropic of Capricorn
  • Antarctic Circle
  • Spring and Autumnal Equinox

When you’re through exploring the solstice page, use the menu to access mini-lessons and games that teach about: 

  • Weather
  • Hurricanes
  • Clouds, Water, and Ice
  • Tides and Oceans
  • Atmosphere
  • Satellites and Technology

And more!

Challenging Math In Movies

November 2nd, 2015

 

It’s Monday, September 21, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

MathBits.com: Math and the Movies

(www.mathbits.com/MathBits/MathMovies/MathMovies.htm)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

Want to make math fun? If you’re willing to do a bit of prep work at the audio-visual department of your local library or on Netflix (or whatever movie provider you use), you and your kids will be rewarded with some really fun math explorations.

This website offers free math activities and worksheets based on short scenes or clips from movies and television shows that present mathematical content (not watered-down content) in a variety of educational styles. As explained at the website, the clips fall into two main categories: 

  1. Clips that demonstrate the actual mathematics at work, such as seeing Abbott and Costello describe how 28 divided by 7 is 13.
  2. Clips that are used as a hook or humorous introduction to a topic, such as watching Lucy and Ethel wrapping chocolates on a conveyor belt prior to solving problems relating to conveyor belts and sequences.

You’ll find movie and TV clips that help demonstrate or introduce everything from pre-algebra to calculus. And then, you follow up by doing the exercises on the free worksheets. When you get to the site read the introduction and then use the menu at the top of the page to access:

Part 1 – Contains movie clip descriptions and free, printable math worksheets for movie and TV titles such as: 

  • Star Wars – Episode I, The Phantom Menace
  • Star Trek – The Original Series: The Trouble With Tribbles
  • The Matrix Revolutions
  • Die Hard with a Vengeance
  • October Sky
  • Stand and Deliver
  • The Wizard of Oz
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  • ~ And more!

Part 2 – Contains movie clip descriptions and free, printable math worksheets for movie titles such as: 

  • Little Big League
  • Wall-E
  • Father of the Bride
  • Pirates of Penzance
  • Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • Road Runner & Wile E. Coyote – “Hot Rod and Reel”
  • The Simpsons: Bart, the Genius
  • Shrek the Third
  • ~ And more!

Note: The movie ratings run the gamut from G to R, so AS ALWAYS, PARENTS SHOULD PREVIEW MATERIAL TO DETERMINE SUITABILITY OF CONTENT. This is a great way to use technology and pop culture to engage older students in the fun of mathematics.

History Lessons from the Library of Congress

September 3rd, 2015

 

It’s Thursday, September 3, 2015, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Free History Lessons from Library of Congress

(http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/lessons/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

At this link on the Library of Congress’s website you will find a gold mine of tried and true lesson plans created by teachers that cover a wide range of history topics. All of the lessons use hyperlinked primary sources that will encourage the learner to dig deeper into the topic and make real connections with the subject.

When arriving at the link, you can search for lessons based on topic, era, or alphabetically. Topics include: 

  • African American History
  • American History
  • American Indian History
  • American Revolution
  • Arts & Culture
  • City & Regional History
  • Civil War
  • Culture & Folklife
  • Discovery and Exploration
  • Government, Law & Politics
  • Immigration & Ethnic Heritage
  • Maps & Geography
  • News, Journalism & Advertising
  • Oral Histories
  • Photographs, Prints, and Posters
  • Poetry and Literature
  • Science, Technology & Business
  • Sports, Recreation & Leisure
  • Women’s History
  • World History & Cultures
  • World War I
  • World War II

Each lesson plan is laid out similarly and includes: 

  • Overview – Includes a summary of the lesson, objectives, a means to check the standards met, time needed for lesson and recommended grade level.
  • Preparation – information and links to materials and resources used
  • Procedure – step by step instruction on implementing the lesson
  • Evaluation – Ideas for evaluating the students’ work

Some lessons also include a “For Students” section with more activities for the lesson.

While these lessons may have been created for the classroom setting, most can easily be adapted for the homeschool setting. Whether you are trying to put together a complete curriculum using primary sources or looking to supplement a specific topic, this website will quickly become a valuable source in your planning.

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