Posts Tagged ‘Smithsonian’

News Literacy Lessons, Games, & Resources

June 8th, 2016

 

It’s Wednesday, June 8, 2016, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Newseum

(www.newseum.org/todaysfrontpages/)

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website is a companion to the Newseum in Washington D.C. What’s a “Newseum”? It’s a real museum (adjacent to the Smithsonian museums) with galleries, theaters, and exhibits “that offer five centuries of news history with up-to-the-second technology in hands-on exhibits.”

It takes visitors behind the scenes to experience how and why news is made. This website offers free lessons and resources to promote language arts, social sciences, critical thinking, and civic responsibility.

The website provides an overview of the Newseum and it’s exhibits, including “Today’s Front Pages” that displays the front pages of daily newspapers worldwide in their original, unedited form. It’s a great way to get an idea of how news is featured and disseminated in any given country.

When you get to the site – you’ll see icon images of “Today’s Front Pages” from newspapers in North America (including every state in the USA), Asia, Caribbean, Europe, Middle East, Oceania, South America, and Africa. Click on any one and the page gets larger so can read the entire front page.

The idea here is that reading worldwide headlines and front page stories may springboard learning and discussion of news events, history, journalism, and more.

When you are through reading the newspaper front pages, use the menu at the top of page to explore the rest of the site including: 

  • Education 
  • Exhibits
  • And more!

This is a great way to combine language arts with social sciences.

National Anthem Day

March 3rd, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, March 3, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Star-Spangled Banner

(amhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/default.aspx)

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

“The Star-Spangled Banner” became the United States’ National Anthem on March 3, 1931. Explore the legacy of this song with this website from the Smithsonian National Museum of History.

There are a few different ways to navigate around the website. After reading the brief overview on the home page you can select the “Begin with The War of 1812” image link at the bottom of the text and proceed through the pages in sequence. Or, if you would rather explore one of the four topics, they can be chosen from the upper menu: 

  • War – Learn about the War of 1812.
  • Flag – Explore the history of the American flag known as The Star-Spangled Banner.
  • Song – Discover the lyrics, composer, and music of “The Star-Spangled Banner.”
  • Legacy – Dig into the symbols of this nation, the changes made to the flag, and rules and rituals associated with it.

Throughout the pages of this website are interactive features to help commit to memory what has been learned and to examine the flag and song more closely. These features can also be accessed either form the “Interact” link in the menu bar or from the home page and include: 

  • Collect – Collect stars by answering questions at the bottom of the pages. When all the stars are collected, students can print out a certificate.
  • Explore – Get up close to The Star-Spangled Banner with this interactive that allows you to zoom into different sections of the flag and learn about what is found.
  • Sing – Watch and sing-a-long with videos of people singing the national anthem.
  • Share – A prompt to tell what the American flag stands for and what it means to you.

Through brief texts and colorful images, this is a great place to add to your American history studies.

George Washington – A National Treasure

February 25th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, February 25, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

George Washington – A National Treasure

(www.georgewashington.si.edu/index.html)

Age Range: 7-18 (Grades 2-12, with parental supervision)

 

Learn all about President George Washington with this website from the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery. Using the full-length portrait, Lansdowne, by Gilbert Stuart as the focal point of this study, visitors can explore the interactive presentations and games to not only examine the portrait but discover interesting facts about George Washington and the time period in which he lived.

When arriving at the site, use the upper menu to navigate to your area of interest. Select from: 

  • The Portrait – Geared towards older students and adults, use the interactive portrait to examine it in detail from three different vantage points: symbolic, biographic, and artistic.
  • Kids – Solve clues to not only discover what is missing in the portrait but also learn interesting facts as to why the items may have been included in the painting. The kid section also includes: 
    • The Patriot Papers – interactive activities such as matching games, crossword puzzles, word searches and more as well as downloadable articles from The Patriot Papers published by the Office of Education at the National Portrait Gallery which include a student and teacher version of the publishing
    • Teacher Guide – Find extra activities and lessons plans to further enhance your studies here.
    • Family Guide – Discover great topical discussion ideas as well as interesting information.
    • Wallpaper – a couple of downloadable images of Washington for your desktop
  • Washington’s Life – Explore the life and times of George Washington with this timeline.
  • Exhibition – Learn more about the painting and its artist as well as try out a couple of samples of the traveling interactives.

This website provides a unique way to learn about the first president of the United States and a fun addition to your history studies.

Smithsonian Museum of Natural History Tour

February 19th, 2016

 

It’s Friday, February 19, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Smithsonian Museum of Natural History

(www.mnh.si.edu/panoramas/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Browse through the exhibition halls of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History from the comfort of your home with this website.

The interactive tours provide 360° panoramic images of the exhibits. These tours are available for both home computer or mobile device. Visitors can also select their version from the sidebar menu. After selecting your preferred version and beginning your tour, learn how to navigate the site by selecting question mark icon. Locate camera icons throughout your tours to get an even closer look at specific items. Exhibits include: 

  • First Floor
    • Rotunda
    • Mammal Hall
    • Human Origins
    • Ocean Hall
    • Discovery Room
    • African Cultures
    • Ice Age
    • Ancient Seas
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fossil Mammals
    • Fossil Plants
    • Early Life
  • Second Floor
    • Written in Bone
    • Egyptian Mummies
    • Bones
    • Insect zoo
    • Butterflies and Plants
    • Geology, Gems & Minerals
    • Korea Gallery

Visit the ground floor to see past exhibits such as: 

  • Western Cultures
  • Soil
  • Orchids
  • Rastafari
  • Coral Reef Crochet
  • Cyprus

There is so much to see and discover that you will want to bookmark this virtual tour to come back to time after time.

Smithsonian Bicycle Collection & Extras

June 26th, 2015

 

It’s Friday, June 26, 2015, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Smithsonian Bicycle Collection

(http://amhistory.si.edu/onthemove/themes/story_69_1.html)

 

Age Range: All (children with parental supervision)

 

Part of the larger America on the Move collection at the National Museum of American History, Behring Center, in Washington, D.C., this portion of the website shares the history of bicycles through informative text and interesting pictures.
When arriving at the link above read a brief description of the collection, then use the “Table of Contents” drop down menu in the upper right to navigate through time. Select from: 
  • Introduction to the Smithsonian Bicycle Collection
  • The Development of the Bicycle
  • Bicycle History from the late 19th century
  • The collection, 1818-1869
  • The collection, about 1875-1881
  • The collection, 1883-1886
  • The collection, 1887-1891
  • The collection 1896-1927
  • The collection, 1935-1965
When arriving at the collection pages, visitors can select the images of the bicycles to learn more details about the bike and its history. Use the link on the left hand side bar to return to the collection of images.

After you are finished checking out all the bicycles in the online exhibit, jump over to the British Council Film Collection to step back in time as you watch the 1945 short film, “How a Bicycle is Made“.

Native Words, Native Warriors

December 4th, 2014

 

It’s Thursday, December 4, 2014, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Native Words, Native Warriors

 

Age Range: 11-17 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

American Indian “Code Talkers” contributed significantly to the war efforts of World War I and World War II. This website, a companion to the Smithsonian Institution exhibition, Native Words, Native Warriors, provides an in-depth lesson plan that explores the lives of Code Talkers.
When arriving at the link above, you are presented with an Overview of the Website that provides a brief description of what will be covered in this unit. Using the upper navigation bar, you may choose to work through the unit in a “Text-Only” version, but many students may prefer the Flash Version (link located at the end of the navigation bar.) In the Flash version, audio and images work together to present information along with additional text. Listen to real Code Talkers tell their stories throughout the presentation. Use the upper navigation on the flash page to move through the chapters, which include: 
  • Introduction: Code Talkers
  • Languages: Living the Culture
  • Boarding Schools: Struggling with Cultural Repression
  • Code Talking: Intelligence and Bravery
  • Coming Home: Strength through Culture
  • Survival: Hard Times and Racism
  • Recognition: Medals and Praise
As you work through the presentation, “code” words in the native language with the English translations are presented throughout. At the end of each chapter, there is an online workbook activity that students can do then print out for their records or thought-provoking questions to encourage further discussion. In the Code Talking chapter, students will use the Navajo’s Code Talker Dictionary online to write coded messages.

Visit the Gallery by selecting the link on the right hand side of the presentation window to view over 170 images.

You can always return to the text version of the chapters or return to the lesson plan by selecting the links under the presentation window. You may also wish to check out the Resources list for further study.

This website provides thorough and interesting insight into the world of Code Talkers.

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