Posts Tagged ‘scientists’

The Great Backyard Bird Count

February 7th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, February 7, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Backyard Bird Count

(www.audubon.org/content/about-great-backyard-bird-count)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

It’s not too early to mark your calendars and get ready to participate in “The Great Backyard Bird Count” scheduled for February 17-20, 2017.

This annual event, sponsored by the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, is your opportunity to join a citizen-science project (for kids, teens, and adults) that helps scientists collect data and investigate far-reaching questions about bird populations.

It only takes as little as 15 minutes on one day. You simply count the birds you see in your backyard and turn in the results. It’s free, fun, and easy – and it helps the scientists to help the birds.

To learn how to participate go to the website http://gbbc.birdcount.org/. Use the menu to register, learn about birds, explore the kids page with fun online games that teach about birds as they entertain, and view the bird photo gallery.

Now, if this sparks your family’s interest in birds, you are sure to enjoy this website: WhatBird.com. Use a tool that helps you to identify a bird by what it looks like. You simply enter its attributes such as habitat, size, color, body shape, bill shape, etc., to drill down results, choosing as many options as you can along the way.

Free Science Activities & Videos

January 31st, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 31, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Siemens Science Day

(www.siemensscienceday.com/index.cfm)

Age Range: 8-11 (Grades 4-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website provides some terrific science lessons, activities and tools. It will also inspire scientific curiosity – not only for kids, but even for parents who aren’t keen in science.

This site is designed for grades 4-6, but don’t let that stop you from exploring what the site has to offer with younger and older students. NOTE: You do have to register to download the lessons in pdf format and to watch the videos. Registration is free and requires the email address and phone number of your school along with information about what subjects and grades you teach. As home educators, we simply supplied a school name (make one up if you don’t already have one), home address, and checked off that we teach all grades and subjects.

When you get to the site you’ll see a brief introduction. Below it is a menu of lessons and fun activities divided into three categories: 

  • Earth Science – Learn about weather, measure the effects of elasticity, and map the ocean, etc.
  • Life Science – Explore the 5 senses, learn the difference between fruits and vegetables, discover how scientists classify organisms, etc.
  • Physical Science – Construct a spectroscope and observe the spectra of various sources of light, discover how different materials absorb solar energy, and use paper chromatography to separate the colors in dyes used to color candies, etc.

Click on any one and a new page opens where you will find: 

  • A brief summary and the objectives of the science lesson/activity
  • A “Download” button to access the lesson in pdf format
  • A video screen where you can watch a video about the lesson
  • A difficulty rating from 1-5 (easy to hard).

Download and fill out a certificate of completion when through.

So, gather the kids around the computer to watch fascinating film clips and learn about the classification system, the three types of matter, parts of a plant cell, the properties of acids and bases, and much more!

The 60 Symbols of Astronomy & Physics

January 24th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 24, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Sixty Symbols

(www.sixtysymbols.com/index.html)

Age Range: 6-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

This fantastic website offers FREE videos about physics and astronomy featuring experts from The University of Nottingham, who explain the strange letters and squiggles (many more than 60 of them) used by scientists.

As explained at the website, “Sixty Symbols is a collection of videos by experts from The University of Nottingham. It’s worth noting many symbols have multiple uses across scientific disciplines and we sometimes tackle them from an unexpected viewpoint.” Here’s some of what you’ll see: 

  • Click on “E” for energy and see an Einstein doll on a swing as a demonstration of potential and kinetic energy.
  • Click on the symbol for the planet Venus (looks like a hand mirror) and learn all about it. You’ll also learn the history of the symbol and it’s use as the universal symbol for women.
  • What has a symbol of a cat got to do with physics? Visit the site, click on the cat and find out!

When you get to the site you’ll see the table of Sixty Symbols (and then some). Click on any one and a new page opens where a video launches that explains it. They are wonderfully engaging and educating.

Free Science Curriculum from Museum of Vision

November 1st, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, November 1, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Museum of Vision

(museumofvision.org/education/)

Age Range: 10-14 (Grades 5-9, with parental supervision)

 

This website is sponsored by the Museum of Vision that has helped educate people of all ages about the eye, vision, and the history of eye care for more than 30 years.

The Museum of Vision has published on its website curriculum guides which focus on the human eye, perspective and how the brain processes images like optical illusions and 3-D.

When you get to the site you’ll see the guides that are in .pdf files:

  • Healthy Eyes, Healthy Body – Designed for parents and educators to use when teaching children about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle for their whole body
  • Eye Openers – Describes the basic concepts of vision, anatomy of the eye, optical illusions, binocular vision, etc.
  • Animal Eyes – The animal kingdom is full of amazing eyes. Discover eyes that look like yours, and eyes that are wildly different. Join scientists on their exciting quest to understand how animals actually see.
  • Art & Vision – Describes how artists create the illusion of 3-dimensions by exploring the basic concepts of vision, size scaling, overlapping, atmospheric perspective and linear perspective.

Click on any one and the .pdf file opens to reveal a well-formatted education guide with interesting text and colorful photos and illustrations. You can review it online or print it out to use offline. Every guide provides interesting discussion points and fun interactive activities. Then take a quiz – Discover your Eye Q!

In addition to the free guides, this website houses online exhibits. From the menu at the top, choose Exhibitions. A new page opens with a menu of online exhibits to explore.

Discover the Animals of Africa

September 23rd, 2016

 

It’s Friday, September 23, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip
at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Mpala Live!

(mpalalive.org/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Visit the wilds of Africa through the webcams at this website sponsored by MPALA, The Anneberg Foundation, and Explore.

In the upper menu select “LIVE CAM” to start your safari. Cameras broadcast live from 6:30 am to 7:30 pm East Africa Time. Select from: 

  • African River Wildlife Camera
  • African Animal Lookout Camera
  • African Safari Camera
  • African Watering Hole Wildlife Camera

Below the webcams, discover the animals that you might see at the hippo pool. Click a silhouette to be taken to the field guide to learn about the animal as well as hear its sound. Choose “STORIES FROM THE BRUSH” to learn about the scientists in the field. Select the “FIELD GUIDE” link to discover Mpala’s animals. In the “CLASSROOM” find lessons plans and units for both Kenyan students and U.S. students to use to learn about the natural world around us. Units include multiple lessons laid out for easy use along with printable worksheets to accompany your studies.

This website is an excellent addition for your geography class studies of Africa or your animal science class.

Challenging Math Games for Grades 2-11

July 11th, 2016

 

It’s Monday, July 11, 2016, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

MangaHigh

(www.mangahigh.com/games/)

Age Range: 7-16 (Grades 2-11 approximately, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers free, sample math games (from its commercially available game-based learning system) that challenge and entertain students in the following math strands: 

  • Addition
  • Algebra
  • Angles
  • Area
  • Circle Theorems
  • Circumference
  • Coordinates
  • Cubic Equations
  • Decimals
  • Division
  • Factoring
  • Fractions
  • Linear Equations
  • Mental Math
  • Multiplication
  • Negative Numbers
  • Parallel Lines
  • Percentages
  • Perimeters
  • Polygons
  • Pythagorean Theorem
  • Quadratic Equations
  • Reflections
  • Rotations
  • Subtraction
  • Times Tables
  • Trigonometry
  • Trinomials
  • And more!

You can try snippets of the games for free, or register as a teacher/principal of your school to play the games in their entirety. Registration is free without obligation to purchase. (Note: It’s always wise to read the privacy statement before completing registration.) Should you decide to purchase a subscription to the program, you’ll be able to access additional tools to save games, track your student’s progress, etc.

As explained at the website, instead of force-feeding dry math content with anachronistic textbooks, MangaHigh entices networked students to learn mathematical concepts as part of game-play.

When you get to the site, scroll down to locate a menu of sample games designed to engage students such as: 

  • Flower Power – Grow flowers and harvest them to make money. The average 7-minute game requires players to put more than 100 fractions, percentages and decimals in order of size, both positive and negative.
  • Pyramid Panic – Students must master the full spectrum of geometry skills from area of a square, through Pythagoras to Sine, Cosine and Tangent in order to win this game.
  • Save Our Dumb Planet – Use missiles to shoot down meteors on a collision course with Earth. A team of dumb scientists are on hand to suggest possible trajectories. Draw lines using equations, recognize the equations of simple lines and common curves, draw simple quadratic curves, and test to see if a point is on a line.
  • PEDMAS Blaster – Robots have run amok and need to be destroyed. Use your order-of-operations code-cracking abilities (including adding and subtracting whole numbers, times tables up to 10 x 10, and using powers and roots) to close these robo-rebels down.

Click on any one to read the instructions and begin the game. Things move quickly – so be prepared to be on your toes!

As explained at the site, the idea here is “to bring out the playful side of math while ensuring that students get the essential skills to master this important subject.” It’s great for remedial work too.

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