Posts Tagged ‘science’

Solve the Mysteries of Plant Life!

March 20th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, March 20, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Plant Escape

(extension.illinois.edu/gpe/index.cfm/)

Age Range: 8-11 (Designed for Grades 4-5, but can be tweaked for a broader age/ability range – with parental supervision)

 

The University of Illinois Extension offers this free, fun science unit that will help your students solve the mysteries of plant life!

The interdisciplinary lessons introduce kids to plant science and how foods grow while enhancing their knowledge of science, math, language arts, social studies, music and art. The activities are flexible and can be used separately or in an ordered manner. Some are designed with independent study in mind, others are group or classroom activities that can be tweaked for the homeschool environment.

When you get to the site, click “enter” to begin the adventure. Or, if you prefer, click on the “Teacher’s Guide” on the menu to get some pointers in how to use the program. Either way, you will be introduced to six “Case Studies” as follows:

  • In Search of Green Life – Find out about the interrelationships that exist between people and plants. Learn about plant structure, plant parts, plant life cycles, and growing plants indoors.
  • Soiled Again – Learn about the composition of soil, nutrients in soil, gardening indoors, and composting.
  • Is It Dust, Dirt, Dandruff or a Seed? – Explore seeds, seed structure, germination, and non-flowering plants.
  • Plantenstein is the Suspect – Discover how plants reproduce and learn about pollination and flower parts.
  • Mysterious Parts That Surprise – Learn all about the differences and similarities between bulbs, rhizomes, and tubers.
  • You’ve Learned the Mysteries of Green Life – Test your knowledge of plants and plant life and enjoy additional activities such as growing lettuce, making a salad, and growing an indoor garden.

Each “Case Study” assumes the student is a detective searching to solve plant mysteries. These “Case Studies” are lessons cleverly disguised as fun activities that teach as they engage students in the process of learning about the science of plants.

Science with Goos, Doughs, Clays, & Compounds!

March 13th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, March 13, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

100+ Goo Recipes

(web.archive.org/web/20050414073557/www.geocities.com/Heartland/3893/Goo.html)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

One of the greatest ways to introduce kids to science is through experiments that involve mixing things together to create something new, interesting, odd, strange, weird and fun! 

There are no bells and whistles at this website, just a simple archive of over 100 recipes for concoctions like slime, play dough, silly putty, and more. (Sometimes, simplicity is so refreshing, isn’t it?) NOTE: Not all of the links work, but there are definitely enough recipes to keep your children busy.

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of recipes divided into categories that include: 

  • Dough’s – Get recipes for play doughs made from flour, coffee, cornmeal, oatmeal, peanut butter, and more!
  • Clay, Goo & other Compounds – Make chocolate clay, clean mud, and the popular non-Newtonian solid using cornstarch and water. Make clay from dryer lint and Kool-Aid, make GAK (using borax and Elmer’s glue), get recipes for sand clay, silly putty, and slime!
  • Papier-mâché – Use dryer lint, strips of paper, and pastes of all textures to create imaginative designs.
  • Paints, Dyes and Crayons – Learn to make your soapy finger paint, and pudding paint. You’ll even find instructions for coloring rice and pasta.
  • Bubbles, Chalk , Stamps, Make-up – Get recipes for all kinds of bubble solutions, make sidewalk chalk, and create your own fruit-flavored stamps.
  • Art, Activities, Gifts – Make salt sculptures, preserve flowers, make ornaments and bath salts.

Click on any one to get the instructions. Then, your kids can mix potions (just like real chemists!) and make fun substances that they can use for open-ended play or to use in arts and crafts projects.

Fractals & Patterns In Nature

March 12th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, March 12, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Dance of Chance

(argento.bu.edu/museum/)

Age Range: 8/15 (Grades 3-9, with parental supervision)

 

The Center for Polymer Studies collaborated with the Boston Museum of Science to develop this online exhibit of experiments and examples that helps students explore the exciting world of patterns in nature – especially fractals.

When you get to the site, you’ll see an introduction and a menu of exhibits that include: 

  • Music of the Heart – Did you know that your electrocardiogram can be used to produce a unique melody? Listen to the “heartsongs” here and discover how they were recorded.
  • Metal Deposition – Watch a movie of copper sulfate electrodeposition viewed through a microscope. Find out what patterns zinc sulfate has in common with a snowflake.
  • Termites – Find out what their foraging trails can tell you about patterns in math including branches and fractals.

These are brief exhibits. If you want to learn more be sure to click on the links for “Fractals in Science Image Galleries” and “Exploring Patterns in Nature Curriculum Guides.” You’ll find free hands-on activities and laboratory experiments in a free complete curriculum that “encourage students to explore how fundamentally random microscopic events can give rise to fractal macroscopic patterns in nature.” Use it online or print it out to use offline an enjoy learning about topics such as: 

  • Fractals
  • Dimensions & Logarithms
  • Randomness
  • Pascal’s Triangle
  • Measuring Average Distances
  • Models of Fractal Growth
  • Biological Branching Patterns
  • Diffusion
  • Percolation in Nature
  • And much more!

Learn more about Albert Einstein

March 8th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, March 8, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Einstein – Image and Impact

(history.aip.org/history/exhibits/einstein/)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Learn about the life and the scientific contributions of Albert Einstein with this site from the AIP Center for the History of Physics.

When arriving at today’s link, use the image links to explore: 

  • Formative Years – Learn about Einstein’s family and his life as a child and young man.
  • The Great Works – 1905 – Read about his early discoveries including the theory of relativity.
  • World Fame – Find out how his discoveries transformed physics.
  • Public Concerns – Explore Einstein’s political and humanitarian views.
  • Quantum and Cosmos – Learn about more of Einstein’s theories.
  • Nuclear Age – Discover how Einstein’s formula E=mc2 was proved and used.
  • Science and Philosophy – Read about the struggles Einstein had balancing his science and his philosophies.
  • The World As I See It – An Essay by Einstein

Each section includes a few brief pages with related images and documents as well as links to other relevant information. This site is also available to download as a PDF for use offline. 

Archeology for Kids

March 6th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, March 6, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Archeology for Kids

(www.nps.gov/history/archeology/public/kids/index.htm)

Age Range: 8-14 (Grades 3-8, with parental supervision)

 

At this website, sponsored by the National Park Service, kids can learn all about the science of archeology. Many national parks maintain dig sites where researchers and scientists find clues to the stories of the past. This site includes information about archeologists and the fields in which they specialize.

When you get to the site you’ll see a brief introduction and a menu below the big words “Archeology for Kids” that includes: 

  • Who Are Archeologists – Meet men and women who study fossil remains of humans, animals, marine life, and the geology of the earth through time.
  • How Do They Work – Find out how archeologists explore various dig sites. Learn about surveys, measuring, excavation, dating, recording, artifacts, and more.
  • The Archeology Lab – Learn what archeologists do in the lab including cataloging artifacts, preserving specimens, and more.
  • Try it! – Enjoy three different fun activities to learn what archeologists do and how they sift for clues that help explain the people and cultures of the past.
  • Dig Deeper – Get information on what it takes to have a career as an archeologist.

Discover the History of Ohio

March 1st, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, March 1, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Ohio History Central

(www.ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Welcome_To_Ohio_History_Central)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Every year on March 1st, Ohio celebrates Statehood Day. However, there is some controversy as to the actual date statehood was confirmed. With this site from the Ohio History Connection, see why there is confusion and learn all about the history of Ohio.

When arriving on the welcome page of the site, read through the introduction and quick facts. Then either use the search engine in the upper menu to find specific information or select the “Browse” dropdown menu to search alphabetically, by category, topic, or time-period or use the timeline to view events sequentially. Topics covered include: 

  • African Americans
  • American Indians
  • American Revolution
  • Arts and Entertainment
  • Business and Industry
  • Civil War
  • Climate and Weather
  • Communities and Counties
  • Education
  • Frontier Ohio
  • Government and Politics
  • Historic Sites
  • Military
  • Reform
  • Religion
  • Science and Medicine
  • Sports and Recreation
  • State Symbols
  • Statehood
  • Transportation
  • Women
  • World Wars

Feeling adventurous? Select the “Random Page” option and dig into a random topic. Concise text often accompanied by an image make this a great research site for your Ohio state history studies.

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