Posts Tagged ‘scale’

Hummingbird Math

August 4th, 2014

 

It’s Monday, August 4, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, children with parental supervision)

 

This website was designed to be a cross-disciplinary opportunity for students in grades K-12 to study the behavior and distribution of the Ruby-throated Hummingbird. These little birds tolerate people well and are drawn to gardens and feeders where they can easily be studied. The data collected is shared via the website with students worldwide. You can access a great deal of information at this site for free, but they also offer the opportunity to register for $20/year, a fee that enables students to participate fully in the research project. (Details are at the site.) However, you don’t have to register to learn interesting facts about a variety of hummingbirds or to access the activities and lesson ideas in math, art, drama, music, geography, and writing.
When you get to the site you will see the introduction to “Hummingbird Math Activities” – just scroll down to review the lessons and click on the links to the other curriculum pages as well.Want more hummingbird fun? Have your children make their very own hummingbird feeder and try some interesting activities like:

  • Hummingbirds weigh between 2 and 20 grams. If you have a kitchen scale, have the kids gather some items around the house they think weigh about as much as a hummingbird. Weigh them and see how close they come.

Science & Engineering Thru Comics

June 3rd, 2014

 

It’s Tuesday, June 3, 2014, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

HowToons

 

Age Range: 8 and up (Grades 3 to adult; children with adult supervision.)

 

This Do-It-Yourself website provides a free and unique way for kids to learn science and engineering by building cool things using illustrations and instructions provided in comic-book format.
The website is the brainchild of three people – a comic book artist, an inventor, and a toy designer – whose mission is to provide engaging science content that inspires creativity, art, and imagination by using “tools of mass construction.”
When you get to the site, you’ll see a variety of information, but to get right to the projects and activities simply click on an item in the “Howtoon Menu” on the left side of the homepage that includes:
  • Animation – Learn how to make a zoetrope.
  • Computing – Use your hands to count in binary mode.
  • Communication – Write letters using materials from nature.
  • Energy – Make an alternative energy source with baked beans, or have fun with a DIY pin wheel.
  • Engineering – Make a soda bottle submarine or spring-loaded chopsticks.
  • Environment – Gauge the wind speed with the Beaufort scale.
  • Fashion – Try on a stylish trash-bag raincoat!
  • Holiday – Make your own snow globe.
  • Music – Become a one-person marching band!
  • Play – Make a marshmallow shooter or a pair of stilts.
  • Tools – Try on a pair of soda bottle goggles.
There is much, much more. Just click on an item and a new page opens with a cartoon story related to the project, a materials, list, downloadable/printable materials, illustrations and even how-to video instructions.
This is a terrific science resource – bookmark it to use again and again.

Interactive Viking Voyage of Discovery

January 30th, 2014

 

It’s Thursday, January 30, 2014, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

NOVA Online -The Vikings

 

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, approximately, with parental supervision)

 

What kid is not fascinated by the stories of Vikings? In 2000, PBS aired a 2-hour NOVA program exploring the less barbaric side of the Norsemen. Take an interactive voyage of discovery through this companion website and gain a better understanding of the Viking world.

Put your oars of exploration in the waters of learning with these topics: 

  

  • Explore a Viking Village by viewing video ‘walk throughs’ of a 1:30 scale model of a medieval Viking village in Sweden.
  • Who Were the Vikings? This question and others are answered wonderfully in a Q&A session with Dr. William Fitzhugh, who gives a better view of what Vikings were really like.
  • Examine the Secrets of Norse Ships, their construction, and how many different types of Viking ships have been discovered.
  • The Viking Diaspora examines the settlement of the Vikings in other lands with the aid of a clickable map.
  • Write Your Name in Runes and learn the meaning of each letter of the Viking alphabet using the interactive feature.
  • Build a Tree-Ring Timeline and discover how scientists have used this method to determine the date of the remains of Viking ships.
 

And because this is a simple to navigate but thorough website, further your Viking studies by examining the other recommended resources.

Tornado Science!

June 4th, 2013

It’s Tuesday, June 4, 2013 and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

Recommended Website:

Weather Wiz Kids: Tornadoes

Age Range 8 and up (approximately, with parental supervision)

The devastating tornadoes in the Midwest may have your children asking many questions about them. At this website designed for kids, a meteorologist describes the science behind tornadoes including what weather conditions are required for them to form. It includes terrific information, pictures, links to free lesson plans, experiments, and more.

When you get to the site, just scroll down the page to read the text and see pictures and illustrations that explain what tornadoes are, how they form, and information on weather conditions associated with tornadoes such as:

  • Funnel Clouds
  • Supercell Thunderstorms
  • Mesocyclones
  • Microbursts
  • Waterspouts
  • Hail
  • Gustnadoes
  • Landspouts
  • Dust Devils

You’ll also learn about the Fujita Scale of Tornado Intensity and some Tornado Safety Tips. There are also links to FREE LESSON PLANS and Tornado Experiments that will enhance your children’s understanding of this dangerous weather phenomenon.

 

Math with Galileo’s Compass!

January 7th, 2013

It’s Monday, January 7, 2013 and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

Recommended Website:

Galileo’s Compass

Age Range: 11 and up (approximately, with parental supervision; younger children may enjoy aspects of this presentation)

ClickScholar Cie, recommended this website, sponsored by the Museo Galileo, that provides free, fascinating, multimedia demonstrations of the uses of Galileo’s compass for math calculations, geometry, architecture, engineering, navigation, and other fields. Learn the history of the compass and Galileo’s contribution to its development during the Renaissance in 1597.

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu that includes:

*History – Watch a presentation about the history of the compass, Galileo’s invention of a specific type of compass, and the improvements he made upon it. See a comparison between compasses, and play the interactive “Compass Game.”

*Explore – Learn about the compass and how it works.

*Simulation – Watch engaging simulations of the many operations you can perform with Galileo’s compass, including:

  • Division of a segment
  • Division of a circumference
  • Squaring a regular figure
  • Measurement of calibers
  • Astronomical quadrant
  • Sum of volumes
  • Scale of slopes
  • And more!

This website offers the user the ability to view the text of the presentations, and provides links to other interesting resources about the compass as well. There is a lot of content here, so bookmark the site and return again to see it all.

Virtual Field Trip to Woolen Mill!

September 21st, 2012

Hi!  It’s Friday, September 21, 2012 and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

Recommended Website:

Small Farm Fibers

Age Range:  All (with parental supervision)

At this website you can take a virtual tour of a small-scale woolen mill to see how wool is made from shearing sheep to making wool yarn and fabric.

When you get to the site, you’ll see a flow chart.  Click on the squares to see the wool-making process that includes:

  • Shearing the Sheep
  • Sorting and Grading
  • Washing and Drying
  • Dying and Carding
  • Spinning and Plying
  • Coning and Skeining

Click on the squares in the flow chart and a new page opens that explains the process through text, photos, and in some instances – videos.

 

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