Posts Tagged ‘planets’

Free Solar System Science Fact Sheets!

May 29th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, May 29, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

8 Planets

(www.8planets.co.uk/)

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

This ad-supported website has free scientific fact sheets containing “Everything You Ever Wanted To know About Our Solar System.”

When you get to the site you’ll see a scrolling screen that displays cartoon animations of the 8 planets in our Solar System along with an interesting fact about each one. Use the horizontal menu at the top of the page to explore the more content-rich information and fact sheets (that contain terrific photographs) archived under the headings:

  • The Sun
  • The Planets
  • The Moon
  • Dwarf Planets
  • Other Bodies (Asteroids, Meteors, Oort Clouds, etc.)
  • Astronomy (Astronomy, Galaxy, Gravity, etc.)
  • Space Exploration (Space Travel, Alien Life, etc.)

The facts are great conversation starters and may springboard your kids to want to learn much more.
 
Interestingly, we couldn’t find any information on this UK-based website that explains who sponsors the site. We didn’t find any notations or references for the source of the information either – even though it looks to be current and accurate. Therefore, as always, parents should preview the site and supervise all Internet use.

Historic Timeline of the Discovery of Planets

October 31st, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, October 31, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

PlanetQuest Timeline

(exoplanets.nasa.gov/resources/1048/)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 3 – adult; children with parental supervision)

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory offers a multi-media historic timeline of the discovery of planets in our solar system and in others.

Turn on your speakers to hear the narration as you watch the video slide show. There’s something for everyone here – a description simply doesn’t do it justice.

Just for Young Astronomers

August 29th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, August 29, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

StarChild

(starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/StarChild.html)

Age Range: 6-12 (Grades 1-8, with parental supervision)


NASA created this website to introduce kids to astronomy through colorful, animated pictures and interesting text accompanied by audio narration. 

After the solar eclipse last week, maybe your kids are more interested in astronomy. This site offers two levels of study for the same topics. Beginners start with level 1 and then progress to level 2 for more in-depth learning. Those who already know a little about the solar system and space can start with level 2. The topics explored in each level are: 

  • Solar System – A complete description of the solar system including the sun, planets, comets, asteroids, and more. Includes links to more facts, trivia, and includes some interactive Q & A. (Level 2 offers a movie courtesy of NASA.)
  • Universe – Learn about galaxies, The Milky Way, stars, quasars, black holes, cosmology, and dark matter. Listen to a song about the Doppler effect. (Level 2 offers “Universe Activities” that include interactive puzzles and art.)
  • Space Stuff – Great information on astronauts, space suits, space travel, space probes, the Hubble Space Telescope, and Who’s Who in Space – along with “Space Activities.”

This site also contains a link to “Imagine the Universe” which is designed for students 14 and up.

Robert Krampf’s Science Experiments

October 25th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, October 25, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Happy Scientist

(thehappyscientist.com/free-science-content)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

This site has free science content that we’ll explore in this review – but you can also become a member ($29.95/year) which allows you to access even more content (specifically, the archives of past newsletters/experiments, and many science videos). We heartily recommend Robert Krampf’s Science Education website.

As for the freebies, when you get to the site you’ll see the list of science videos including: 

  • Definition of a Mineral
  • Paper Petals
  • How They Get the Sparks in a Sparkler
  • Cloud Formation
  • Planets and Pennies
  • and more!

And until October 31, 2016, go to this page to have free access to his Halloween Science videos.

Robert’s experiments are designed to make science fun and understandable. Most are simple enough for very young students, but written to make them fun for adults as well.

Explore the “Space Place” for Kids!

September 13th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, September 13, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

NASA Space Place

(spaceplace.nasa.gov/)

Age Range: 6-12 (Grades 1-6, with parental supervision)

 

NASA sponsors this non-commercial website to show kids that science, technology, and learning about space are fun and within their grasp. It offers free projects and activities that lead kids step-by-step through challenging subjects such as the electromagnetic spectrum, orbits, gravitational waves, tidal forces, binary and hexadecimal notation, and more. As the website explains, these topics are “treated simply and concisely, with everyday analogies and metaphors, concrete examples, and compelling illustrations.”

When you get to the site you’ll see the Space Place logo and below it a menu of activities that includes:  

  • Explore – Learn about planets, lasers, weather satellites, orbits, gravity, and more through interactive animations, demonstrations, and videos.
  • Do – Build a bubble-powered rocket, make moon cookies, make a relief map, build a physics machine, and whip up some El Nino pudding! You’ll find instructions and illustrations for these hands-on projects.
  • Play – Play interactive games that teach as they entertain. Go on a virtual mission to Jupiter, explore the solar system, compare the sizes of planets, do space-themed crossword puzzles, word searches, and more.

This is a terrific way to engage kids in learning about science through technology.

European Space Agency Kids Page

August 2nd, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, August 2, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

European Space Agency Kids Page

(www.esa.int/esaKIDSen/index.html)

Age Range: 6-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

So you know a lot about astronauts, satellites, and space probes? On this European Space Agency (ESA) website for kids, you may be surprised not to find mention of American spacecraft such as Endeavor, Galileo, Voyager, Pioneer, and Challenger. In their place, meet CryoSat, Envisat, Rosetta, Columbus, GIOVE-A, Ariane-5 and more!

There is no mention of John Glenn, Sally Ride, or Neil Armstrong; the heroes here include such greats as Vladimir Remek, Miroslav Hermaszewski, Anousheh Ansari, Ulf Merbold, Christer Fugelsang, and Thomas Reiter. Move over, NASA — make room for the ESA! You will definitely learn something new and different at this website! 

When you get to the site you will see some features. Use the menu at the top of your screen to explore topics such as “Our Universe” and “Life in Space.”  As you click each main topic, you will see a related photo; parts of the photo can be clicked to learn all about the planets (Pluto has not been demoted here), galaxies, space stations, life in space and more. 

From the main page you will also see a menu on the left of your screen with three items: “Lab,” “Fun,” and “News.” These sections contain interesting facts, sliding-panel puzzles, games, activities, things to build, animated cartoons, news items, and more. Each time you change topics, these sections may change, so be sure to keep checking them.

In the “News” section, don’t miss the word “More” at the bottom right-hand corner — this leads to the site archives with tons of fascinating articles and activities. 

There is too much here to explore in one visit, and this site is kept updated. Bookmark it so you can come back often!

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