Posts Tagged ‘orchestra’

Make Music Fun

December 2nd, 2017

 

It’s Saturday, December 2, 2017, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Making Music Fun

(www.makingmusicfun.net/)

Age Range: 6-11 (Grades 1-6, with parental supervision)

 

This ad-supported website provides engaging, FREE music appreciation resources including music lessons, interactive games, printable sheet music and music theory flashcards designed for kids.

When you get to the site you’ll find resources divided into two sections – Print It and Library. Examples of resources visitors will find include: 

  • Oliver Octopus Arcade – Play music theory arcade games and learn to identify the whole note, half note, eighth note, etc. Learn note names for the treble and bass clef.
  • Free printable sheet music that you can preview and listen to online – From beginner to intermediate players, you’ll find sheet music for the piano, violin, flute, recorder, trumpet and trombone.
  • Free Composer Worksheets – Print out fun wordsearch and dot-to-dot puzzles based upon your favorite classical composers including Bach, Beethoven, Bernstein, Chopin, Gershwin, Joplin, Mozart, Prokofiev, Tchaikovsky and more!

You’ll also find practice charts, theory worksheets, and even printable award certificates.

The library is an amazing resource! Access an archive of FREE music lessons on video for piano, recorder, flute, clarinet, trumpet, guitar, percussion, and bagpipe. There are even video flashcards for learning music theory!

You’ll also find biographies of great composers in the baroque, classic, romantic, and modern music eras.

Learn the instruments of the orchestra (woodwind, brass, string, percussion, and keyboard) with highlights about their history, how they are played, how they are made, and other fun facts.

Don’t miss the “Homeschool Music Resource Index” of suggested music activities created just for homeschool parents. Print out music lessons that help children learn about tempo, rhythm, pitch, musical symbols, form, and much more.

There’s even a “Jazz Index” with lessons and resources for learning about jazz music and great jazz musicians.
 
This site provides the very best in blending music with educational technology.

Fun & Games with Music

July 8th, 2017

 

It’s Saturday, July 8, 2017, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

SFSKids – Fun and Games with Music

(www.sfskids.org/index.html?f=menu)

Age Range: 8-13 (Grades 3-8, with parental supervision)

 

Explore the world of orchestral music with the fun activities at this website created by the San Francisco Symphony.

Through interactive games, students can learn about the instruments of the orchestra, the basics of conducting, and what is involved in composing music as well as listening skills to gain familiarity with orchestral music. Some audio excerpts are permanently part of the program while others that are noted with a leaf symbol are rotated out every 6 months to provide variety for the student.

When arriving at the SFSKids site, read the introduction then select the “Let’s Start!” link to read some brief instructions for using the site. There are instructions throughout each activity making this site very user friendly.

Exploration activities include: 

  • Sea of Knowledge – Discover Music – Discover facts about instruments, music, and composers.
  • Music Streams – Listen to Music – Listen to music selections from Bach, Beethoven, Bernstein, Brahms, Copland, Gershwin, Liszt, Mahler, Mendelssohn, Mozart, Prokofiev, Shubert, Strauss, Stravinsky, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Wagner, and many more.
  • Musical Skies – Play with Music – includes 2 different activities: 
    • Star Catcher – Select a musical piece and as you listen move your mouse to the rhythm of the music to catch stars with the rabbit.
    • Mood Journey – Make a musical selection then click on the ‘falling’ phrases to change the background as you listen.
  • Instrument Garden – Perform Music – Learn about and virtually play instruments.
  • Symphony Hall – Conduct Music – Learn how a conductor directs an orchestra with this activity.
  • Music Mountain – Compose Music – Learn the basics of music composition and compose your own tune.

There is a lot to explore on this website so be sure to bookmark to come back to time after time.

The Vienna Vegetable Orchestra

March 25th, 2017

 

It’s Saturday, March 25, 2017, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Vienna Vegetable Orchestra

(www.vegetableorchestra.org/index.php)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Listen to the music of the Vienna Vegetable Orchestra! No kidding! A group of Austrian musicians got together and created an entire line of instruments from vegetables! Not only that, they record their music and perform in concert halls!

When you get to the website, select the “Info” link in the upper menu to learn about the group. While these performers take their music seriously, they do have a sense of humor. Terrific puns and double entendres are peppered throughout the text making it a delicious read! Use the menu to navigate the site that includes: 

  • Instruments (found under “Info”) – See photos of the various instruments and their names.
  • Questions & Answers (also found under “Info”) – Get most of your questions about the Vienna Vegetable Orchestra answered. Then use the “ask us” link at the bottom of that page to query the VVO further.
  • Sound – Listen to “cuts” from the Vienna Vegetable Orchestra’s CDs.
  • Video – THE BEST PART! Watch video performances and a video of the Vienna Vegetable Orchestra shopping for their instruments at the vegetable stand in the local marketplace, transforming the veggies into musical instruments (with the aid of knives and drills), and then performing a concert. (Be sure to turn on your speakers!)

If you and your kids want to see more edible instruments, then check out the YouTube video, Introduction of Handmade Musical Instruments“. A Japanese musician plays the carrot flute, asparagus panpipes, cucumber trumpet and more. While he speaks in Japanese, there are English subtitles. (Note: This is YouTube – as always parents should preview to determine suitability of content.)

Solve Musical Mysteries

January 21st, 2017

 

It’s Saturday, January 21, 2017, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Musical Mysteries

(www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/schools/4_11/music/mm/)

Age Range: 7-11 (Grades 2-6, with parental supervision)

 

This fun, animated website from the BBC takes children on a mystery adventure to find the “Lost Music” as they learn about music.

Navigate through the story by clicking the next or “Get Going” option when ready. Games include: 

  • Seaside Activity – Complete the sound search puzzle.
  • Sound Story – Match the sounds to the words in the story.
  • Cave Sounds – Make a sound composition.
  • Mood Music – Listen to the music and select the emotion it creates.
  • Animal Match Up – Match the music to the animal you would associate it with.
  • Fact Files – Learn about the parts of an orchestra.
  • Instrument Match Up – Match the sound of the instrument to its image.

When you are finished with the activities, take a quick quiz to test what you have learned. Click the “Teacher’s Guide” link in the side bar, then select the “Teacher’s Area” text link on the page to be taken to another page with more links to printable lesson plans and worksheets to accompany the site.

Classical Music and Games

December 12th, 2015

 

It’s Saturday, December 12, 2015, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Sphinx Kids

(www.sphinxkids.org/index.html)

Age Range: 6-13 (Grades 1-8, with parental supervision)

 

This website is a companion to the Sphinx Organization that “envisions a world in which classical music reflects cultural diversity and plays a role in the everyday lives of youth.” Sphinx Kids bring classical music into underserved schools nationwide. The website, partially sponsored by AT&T and the New York Philharmonic, provides free interactive games that introduce kids to the world of classical music, instruments of the orchestra, and the diversity of many composers of classical music.

When you get to the website you’ll see a menu that includes: 

  • Minority Composer’s Forum – Learn about the lives and musical compositions of renown minority composers such as Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Undine Smith Moore, Heitor Villa-Lobos and more. Listen to samples of their compositions.
  • Practice Room – Pick a stringed instrument (violin, viola, cello, or bass) and watch videos of minority musicians playing scales and etudes.
  • Minorities On Stage – Watch videos of performances by minority musicians, and be sure to click on “See What’s Going On Backstage” to watch video-interviews with the musician-laureates. Their stories are inspirational.
  • Orchestration Station – Get familiar with the instruments of the orchestra. Pick one and hear it played.
  • Rhythm Band – Use a virtual pencil to place notes on a scale, then pick one or several instruments to hear how it sounds.
  • Music Match: Composers – Match the classical composers to their musical compositions.
  • Music Match: Instruments – Play a match game with instruments of the orchestra.
  • Instrument Storage Room – Take an animated tour of the storage room and learn about each instrument and hear it played.
  • String Instrument Gallery – Learn about each part of the violin, viola, cello, and bass and what it does.
  • Composer’s Gallery – Take an animated tour of a gallery of composers born from the 1600s through the 1900s. Read their bios and hear samples of their music. Includes: Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Gershwin, Ellington, Debussy, Danielpour, Chopin, Britten, Brahms, Bernstein, Beethoven, Beach, Handel, Mozart, Lindberg, Leon, Kolb, Kodaly, Joplin, Prokofiev, Stravinsky, Sheng, and many more.

This is a terrific way to introduce children and their families to classical music and to the diversity of the composers of that music.

Explore the Science of Music

September 1st, 2015

 

It’s Saturday, July 18, 2015, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Exploratorium: The Science of Music

(http://www.exploratorium.edu/music/index.html)

 

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Part of the larger Exploratorium website, the museum of science, art, and human perception located in San Francisco, California, this website explores the science of music through online exhibits, movies, and questions.
When arriving at the website, use the text links in the introductory paragraph to select where you would like to begin. Learn about the science involved in music with the interactive, online exhibits which include: 
  • Dot mixer – Using sound samples from different types of music discover the science of “mixing”.
  • Kitchen sink-o-pation – Discover how context has an impact on how we interpret the sounds we hear.
  • Step re-mix – Explore the musical dance form of stepping which uses the body as a percussion instrument.
  • Online drum circle – Join a live, world-wide drum circle (please note that this may not be working during your visit).
  • Headlands experiments – View videos of Exploratorium staff members experimenting with musical sound in the hills north of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge.
  • Take the beat back – Examine the origins and evolution of some interesting instruments.
Movies include an instrument builder who uses unusual materials to create his instruments, a demonstration and explanation of stepping, the specifics of orchestra tuning, and following a saxophonist to different locations to discover how acoustics affect music.

Learn the answers to the following questions:

  • How do opera singers carry notes for so long?
  • Why do some songs get stuck in your head?
  • Why can you hear the bass from a distance, but not the treble?
  • Why does some music give you goose bumps?
  • Why does your recorded voice sound strange?
  • Why does sad music sound sad?
  • Why does singing in the shower sound so good?
Music is all around us and this website encourages visitors to appreciate the science behind it.
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