Posts Tagged ‘Northern Lights’

The Polar Express

December 10th, 2014

 

It’s Wednesday, December 10, 2014, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

The Polar Express

 

Age Range: 4-10 (Grades K-5, with parental supervision)

 

One of the best-loved holiday books is The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg. The timeless story captures the imagination of children everywhere. We thought it would be fun to explore learning language arts through this magical tale of a boy who takes a night-time train ride to the North Pole.

The author’s website offers an overview of the book and samples of the outstanding illustrations that earned a Caldecott Medal. You can also read the author’s bio, see a timeline of his work, and access resources and interactives themed around his books.

When you get to the site you’ll find a picture of each book cover/title. If you click on them – you will be directed to purchase the book. There is no requirement to purchase anything in order to use the free resources. Scroll past those covers to the bottom of the page to find a link titled “Teachers: Discussion Guides for all of Chris Van Allsburg books.” When you click you’ll find additional curriculum connections for the Polar Express.

Creative Writing/Language Arts:

* Brainstorm winter words.
* Ask children to imagine their own magical midnight train ride and write about what they see on their journey and what their final destination looks like.
* Go through the book together and pick out all of the adjectives and list them on a large sheet of paper. Do the same for the verbs and nouns.

Read-Aloud:

* As a way to begin using the book as the basis for a unit or simply as a treat for the children, host a Polar Express Party. Click the link to download a complete party kit.
Science/Geography:

* Have children locate the North Pole on a globe or map. They can research and write a short report on the landscape, climate, and other characteristics of the North Pole
* Topics for Further Research
o Polar ice cap
o Northern lights
o Reindeer
o Weather and climate – what are the average high and low temps?

Art:

* Have children draw what they would see out the window of the Polar Express on its way to the North Pole.

Music:
* Give each child a bell. Play holiday songs to which they can ring the bells.
* At your party, break the kids into groups of four. Give each group a song and have them come up with a way to accompany it with their bells.

When you think you’ve done everything you can, find the link to “More Games & Fun” to discover activity sheets, games, recipes, and more AND discussion guides for all of Chris Van Allsburg’s other books!
Return to this site often!

Northern Lights!

January 2nd, 2007

Recommended Website:

Northern Lights

Santa has come and gone, but you can give your children an idea of what’s happening at the North Pole right now. The heavens are performing a spectacular light show! MaryAnna discovered this terrific website all about the Aurora Borealis, aka the Northern Lights…

When you get to the site, for an instant and awesome display of the Northern Lights simply click on the small strip of beautifully colored panels near the upper right of the screen to start viewing a slideshow of about 1,700 aurora photos! These are some of the best to be found anywhere, and with good reason.

This website runs a monthly and an annual aurora photo competition, and all the winners are posted here! (If your contribution wins, you get an all-expense-paid trip to Norway! The catch is, you would have to be somewhere near an aurora first in order to snap a winning photo! :)

The northern lights have been especially active at the North Pole lately due to recent strong sunspot activity. The little Magnetometer icon in the upper right corner of this website is updated every thirty seconds to show you what’s going on in the earth’s magnetic field right this minute! More information about current conditions is located in the right-hand column of the main page of this site. (You can easily return to the main page from anywhere on the site by clicking the logo centered at the top of your screen.)

What do sunspots and the earth’s magnetic field have to do with auroras? And what do auroras have to do with the northern lights? You can read all about the science behind the Northern Lights and more by using the menu located in the upper left corner of the main page. It includes:

  • What Are Northern Lights? — Find out the physics behind a northern lights display, the frequency of occurrence, the colors, form and structure, the sounds they make, and discover auroras on other planets! Be sure to watch the aurora video clips in the right hand columns located in the “What Are Northern Lights” subcategory, “Colours”. Some of them are just too awe-inspiring for words.
  • Aurora in Science — Meet the auroral research pioneers. Then explore modern research including magnetic, radiowave, and┬áRocket Range observations.
  • Realtime Measurements — Check out the gadgets and gizmos (auroral instruments) that stream their up-to-the-minute animations and cams of current aurora activity!
  • Auroral Mythology — Find out how Vikings, Native Americans, and people in olden times explained the strange lights in the sky.
  • User’s Corner — Did you know there was once a man-made, artificial aurora? Download a photo of it here, along with a few other wallpapers (computer screen backgrounds), or read the FAQ’s and join a discussion with other aurora fans. Find a list of links to other websites where you can “ooh” and “aaaah” all day to your heart’s content! :)

If after viewing all of these incredible aurora photos, video clips, and cams you simply must go see the northern lights, you can get information here to help you plan your next vacation. There’s nothing quite like seeing
them in person. Pack warmly, and bon voyage! :)

Auroras!

September 24th, 2002

Recommended Website:
Auroras: Paintings in the Sky

List member, Jacqueline, recommended this fascinating site (sponsored by the
Exploratorium) that explains those beautiful phenomena known as the Northern
Lights. Since NASA just recently announced the official opening of “Aurora
Season” with the beginning of Autumn, I thought many of you would enjoy
exploring this site with your children.

When you get to the site click on the button that says, “Self-Guided Tour.”
A new page opens with a menu from which you can choose to view pictures of
auroras, learn what makes them happen, discover where you can see them, and
find out why they are different colors, and what makes them happen. You can
also just click on the “Start” button and begin a progressive tour of the
site that will take you through each segment, including the opportunity to
listen to a NASA expert describe auroras.

When you are through taking the tour, you might want to read more about auroras. The NASA Science Newsletter for September 23, 2002, features information on auroras. Here is a blurb about the article and a link where
you can read it:

Northern autumn began today at 55 minutes past midnight EDT (Sept. 23rd at 0455 UT), which means “aurora season” is officially underway. Scientists
aren’t certain of all the reasons why, but there are more geomagnetic storms during autumn than other times of year. Already this month three such storms have triggered auroras visible as far south as the Carolinas in the United States. Some were so bright they cast shadows! It’s an auspicious beginning to one of the loveliest times of year.

Click here for the
FULL STORY.

css.php