Posts Tagged ‘NASA’

Tour Our Ocean Planet

August 12th, 2016

 

It’s Friday, August 12, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Ocean Planet

(seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/ocean_planet_scripts/tour.pl?sel=211+214+242+249+222+378+225+386+215+269+208+219+218&page=&cs=59753)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision).

 

Today’s website allows you to take a virtual tour of the Smithsonian’s acclaimed exhibit, Ocean Planet. Using audio and visual technology along with beautiful graphs, charts, photographs and illustrations you can explore and examine Earth’s oceans and the interconnectedness of them to every habitat and creature worldwide. Designed for a general audience, younger children will need some help with navigation.

When you get to the site you will see a menu bar at the top of your screen. Directly below the menu are the numbers 1-13 – and below the numbers is a very brief introduction, links to sounds of the sea, and a link to the “floor plan” that allows you to see any part of this amazing exhibit. 

Note: As the links on this site do occasionally change, you might encounter an error message. If you do, just select “Please request your tour again,” then select “Ocean Planet Preview Tour” from the menu.

There is an assortment of virtual tours of the various segments of this exhibit. We have chosen to feature the Curator’s Preview Tour because it provides an overview of what is available to you in the real-time exhibit – most of which you can explore virtually. Once you take this tour, you will undoubtedly want to bookmark the site and return to explore the different galleries in the exhibit thoroughly.

So, from the landing page just click on the “next” button or the number “2” to start the tour. Each successive page describes briefly a gallery or section of the Ocean Planet exhibit. You will see a photo of the gallery, a brief description and a clickable menu that takes you to each part of that gallery where you can learn all about subjects like: 

  • Oceanography
  • Marine Biodiversity
  • Mariana Trench
  • Ocean Depths
  • Seafaring Communities Worldwide
  • Marine Habitat Destruction
  • Marine Scientist Biographies

You’ll also see the “cafeteria menu” but just click past it to continue with what’s available at the website. Once you’ve seen what’s available, use the “Floorplan” icon to return to any section that interests you and immerse yourself in ocean knowledge.

European Space Agency Kids Page

August 2nd, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, August 2, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

European Space Agency Kids Page

(www.esa.int/esaKIDSen/index.html)

Age Range: 6-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

So you know a lot about astronauts, satellites, and space probes? On this European Space Agency (ESA) website for kids, you may be surprised not to find mention of American spacecraft such as Endeavor, Galileo, Voyager, Pioneer, and Challenger. In their place, meet CryoSat, Envisat, Rosetta, Columbus, GIOVE-A, Ariane-5 and more!

There is no mention of John Glenn, Sally Ride, or Neil Armstrong; the heroes here include such greats as Vladimir Remek, Miroslav Hermaszewski, Anousheh Ansari, Ulf Merbold, Christer Fugelsang, and Thomas Reiter. Move over, NASA — make room for the ESA! You will definitely learn something new and different at this website! 

When you get to the site you will see some features. Use the menu at the top of your screen to explore topics such as “Our Universe” and “Life in Space.”  As you click each main topic, you will see a related photo; parts of the photo can be clicked to learn all about the planets (Pluto has not been demoted here), galaxies, space stations, life in space and more. 

From the main page you will also see a menu on the left of your screen with three items: “Lab,” “Fun,” and “News.” These sections contain interesting facts, sliding-panel puzzles, games, activities, things to build, animated cartoons, news items, and more. Each time you change topics, these sections may change, so be sure to keep checking them.

In the “News” section, don’t miss the word “More” at the bottom right-hand corner — this leads to the site archives with tons of fascinating articles and activities. 

There is too much here to explore in one visit, and this site is kept updated. Bookmark it so you can come back often!

Winter Solstice Science

December 15th, 2015

 

It’s Tuesday, December 15, 2015, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

SciJinks: What’s a Solstice

(scijinks.nasa.gov/solstice)

Age Range: 8-13 (Grades 3-8, with parental supervision)

 

The Winter Solstice will soon be here (for those in the Northern Hemisphere of planet Earth). It marks the shortest day and the longest night of the year. The winter solstice is celebrated by various cultures and religions worldwide. But what exactly is a solstice?

At this NASA-sponsored website, scientists provide an easy-to-understand explanation of the solstice complete with illustrations and photographs. This presentation includes information about: 

  • The Equator
  • Earth’s Axis of Rotation
  • Arctic Circle
  • Tropic of Cancer
  • Tropic of Capricorn
  • Antarctic Circle
  • Spring and Autumnal Equinox

When you’re through exploring the solstice page, use the menu to access mini-lessons and games that teach about: 

  • Weather
  • Hurricanes
  • Clouds, Water, and Ice
  • Tides and Oceans
  • Atmosphere
  • Satellites and Technology

And more!

How Much Is a Billion or a Trillion?

June 8th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, June 8, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

The MegaPenny Project

 

Age Range: 6 and up (Grades 1 through adult; children with adult supervision)

 

We hear BIG numbers mentioned all of the time – government budgets require trillions of dollars, bailouts require billions of dollars, and NASA’s rover traveled millions of miles to Mars. Talking about these gigantic numbers is one thing – visualizing them can be very difficult. 
One financial commentator, K.C. Cole explained: 
We automatically ‘read’ a billion as about a third of a trillion. After all, it’s only three zeros off. But of course, a trillion is a thousand times a billion, and a thousand is a lot. Decrease your salary by a factor of a thousand, and it could go from 200,000 dollars to 200. Increase class size by the same amount, and your 15 students would turn into 15,000… Our brains haven’t evolved to directly deal with such staggering numbers, but we can use stories and metaphors to retrain ourselves.
Enter The MegaPenny Project that takes one small U.S. penny and shows you what a billion (or a trillion or more) pennies would look like. You’ll even find out how many pennies it would take to fill the Empire State Building. Not only will you SEE what that many pennies looks like, you’ll discover things such as the value of the pennies, size of the pile, weight, and the area they would cover (if laid flat). Computer images make visualization of these gigantic numbers and facts a snap.

When you get to the site you will see a brief introduction and a menu. For the best effect, ignore the menu and follow the progressive “tour” from start to finish by clicking on the words “Enter The Mega Penny Project.” You and your kids will be amazed to discover what BIG numbers really look like. You will also find out some fascinating information along the way, such as the answer to this question:

Would you rather be paid one million dollars today – or – would you rather be paid one penny today (1¢), twice that tomorrow (2¢), twice that the next (4¢), etc. for 30 days?

Go to today’s site to find the answer. When you finish exploring the MegaPenny Project – don’t miss the MegaMoo project. (Same idea, only using Holstein cows!)

Bonus! Reading Recommendation: To enhance learning about large numbers, your child may enjoy reading, One Grain of Rice: A Mathematical Folktale by Demi. You may be able to get it at your local library for free.

Out of this World Virtual Field Trip to Saturn’s Moons

February 13th, 2015

 

It’s Friday, February 13, 2015, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Cassini Solstice Mission

 

Age Range: All (children with parental supervision)

 

This NASA website from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology will take visitors to the far reaches of space and on virtual tours of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, and its tiny moon, Enceladus. NASA’s Cassini spacecraft arrived at Saturn in July 2004 and, along with the European-built Huygens probe, opened a window into a world never seen before.

 

When arriving at the website, it might be beneficial to browse through the information available in the “About Saturn & Its Moons” section available on the right sidebar. In the dropdown menu under About Saturn & Its Moons, select “Titan”. When arriving at this page, read over the introduction then hover your mouse over the topics in the image for more information. Next, select the “Titan Virtual Tour” tab and click the text link “Launch Saturn Moons Explorer: Titan” to begin your tour. A new window will open and an Overview video will play. When you are done watching the video, select the “3D Globe” link under the screen to explore the following surface features: 

 

  • Impact Crater
  • Huygens Landing Site
  • Drainage Channels
  • Dunes
  • Northern Lakes
  • The Smile
  • Ice Volcano
  • Xanadu
  • Titan’s Sierras

 

The images come in a variety of types: radar, visible, composite, and/or infrared. Return to the selection by clicking “back to 3D Map”. Choose the “Quick Facts” option for basic information about Titan or select “Latest Images” for more images of Titan. Click the small “find out more” text link at the bottom of the window for links to other sites relating to the Cassini Solstice Mission.

When you are done with the tour, close the window and return to main page to continue learning about Titan. Choose the Atmosphere, Surface, Science Objectives, or Publications tabs for details about Titan and the Cassini mission. Select the Image Galley tab for a visual interactive tool for more images.

On the sidebar select the Videos & More option for loads of videos, an interactive timeline, printables, and to access another virtual tour for the Enceladus virtual tour. Similarly presented and navigated through as the Titan tour, visitors will explore the following location on Enceladus: 

 

  • Plumes
  • Tiger Strips
  • Transitional Terrain
  • Cratered Terrain
  • Modified Craters
  • Icy Riffs
  • Southern Polar Terrain

 

After finishing your tours and exploring all that this website has to offer, don’t forget to check out the Education section on the sidebar for loads of materials, lessons, and resources for your classroom. If you know someone interested in astronomy, particularly Saturn, this website is a down-to-earth resource for an out-of this world study. 

PlanetQuest (CSAW)

October 28th, 2014

 

It’s Tuesday, October 28, 2014, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

NASA: PlanetQuest Timeline

 

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 3-Adult; children, with parental supervision)

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory offers a multi-media historic timeline of the discovery of planets in our solar system and in others. Turn on your speakers to hear the narration as you watch the video slide show.

Then, visit the main PlanetQuest website with a dazzling array of astronomical science, technology, and incredible multi-media space-themed games, simulations, movies and virtual tours!

There’s something for everyone here – a description simply doesn’t do it justice. This one earns a ClickSchooling Award (CSAW) for excellence in blending technology with education.
css.php