Posts Tagged ‘light’

Take a Journey to a Black Hole!

November 28th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, November 28, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

HubbleSite: Black Holes – Gravity’s Relentless Pull

(hubblesite.org/explore_astronomy/black_holes/)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 3 and up approximately; children with parental supervision)

 

The Space Telescope Science Institute offers this terrific website that allows you to engage in a multi-media, in-depth inquiry into the astronomy and physics of black holes through animations and interactive experiments. Explore light, gravity, and the scale of our universe.

When you get to the site, watch a brief, narrated animation that provides information on how black holes are formed. Then, begin your virtual journey to a black hole through three interactive modules that include: 

  • Finding the Invisible – Locate and identify various objects in the universe such as a binary star, the Cygnus galaxy, the Andromeda spiral galaxy, the sun, the moon, the Milky Way, a quasar, a red giant, Saturn, the crab nebula and more. As each object comes into view, read more about it on the sidebar and by clicking on the “Learn More” button.
  • The Voyage – Learn about scales and distances by taking a virtual trip to a black hole. Find out about the objects you pass on your trip through space. Measure your speed and distance traveled. Get explanations of the concepts of lightspeed and lightyear. When you reach your destination, mouse over the black hole to learn about its features.
  • Up Close and Personal – Orbit a black hole and learn all about it. Try some interactive experiments and answer related questions.

You can also explore the “Black Hole Encyclopedia” and “Glossary” to learn even more.

Thomas Edison – A Lifetime of Innovation

October 19th, 2017

 

It’s Thursday, October 19, 2017, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Thomas Edison – A Lifetime of Innovation

(www.schenectadymuseum.org/edison/index.htm)

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

October 21st is the anniversary of the incandescent lamp invented in 1879 by Thomas Edison. This website from the Schenectady Museum in New York explores the life and inventions of Edison and their impact on history.

Use the menu to the right of the main slideshow to select from these topics in the Edison Timeline: 

  • Early Life – Learn about Edison’s ancestors, early inventions, the phonograph and more.
  • Lighting – Explore the history surrounding the invention of the incandescent lamp.
  • After Lighting – Dig into the formation of the General Electric and other Edison business ventures and inventions.
  • Legacy of Invention – Discover groups that formed to commemorate Edison’s work.
  • Edison Classroom – Download PDF documents, artifacts, personal letters, publications and primary documents that illustrate the life and work of Edison to use for your studies.

Or select from three different interactive features: 

  • Adventures in Electricity – an online 1949 comic book “The Story of Light” from the Adventure Series by General Comics
  • Early Edison Film – black and white films including the 1922 silent films “A Day with Thomas Edison”, “Edison’s and Visit to Schenectady” as well as films with sound including “Edison and the AIEE”, “Thomas Edison at his Winter Home”, and the color educational film “The Principles of Electricity” and more
  • Identify Your Light Bulb – Think you have an old GE light bulb? Use this section to identify and determine the age of your bulb as well as learn about the evolution of the incandescent lamp and much more.

Throughout the informative pages there are hundreds of images to explore. This website provides a wonderful overview of the life of Thomas Alva Edison.

Math Dude’s Tips

September 11th, 2017

 

It’s Monday, September 11, 2017, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Math Dude

(mathdude.quickanddirtytips.com/categoryindex/all/Page/1/sortbyalpha/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This is an unusual ad-supported website that offers explanations and tips for making learning math easier from Jason Marshall, Ph.D., also known as “The Math Dude.”  Marshall is a research scientist at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) studying the infrared light emitted by starburst galaxies and quasars.

Math Dude’s tips are archived on a big, umbrella website called “Quick and Dirty Tips” with advice from experts in a variety of fields including education, money, work, health, and more.

We only looked at the Math Dude section for this review. Parents, as always, should preview this site and determine suitability of content and supervise all Internet use by children and teens.

When you get to the site you’ll see “The Math Dude’s Most Recent Tips”, followed by “The Math Dude’s Most Popular Tips” and “The Math Dude’s Archive”. You can jump right in by clicking on any tip. A new page opens where you will see the tip or lesson presented in blog format, and you can click on an audio recording to listen as Jason delivers the tip. There are lots of math tips to select from like: 

  • Learn how to add quickly, convert decimals to fractions, multiply by eleven, determine area and volume, explore Venn diagrams, and more.
  • Make a Mobius Strip, learn about the Fibonacci sequence and the Golden Ratio.
  • Get a definition and explanation of math terms including irrational and rational numbers, sets and subsets, associative property, distributive property, trigonometry, and more.
  • Find out how to amaze your friends with number tricks, calculate how fast your money will grow, estimate how fast someone is running, and send encrypted messages.

Find tips for science, writing and grammar by locating the “Education” tab on the tiny horizontal menu located below the “Quick and Dirty Tips” headline at the top and clicking on it.

Free Cartoon Science Experiments

September 5th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, September 5, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Hunkin’s Experiments

(www.hunkinsexperiments.com/default.htm)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

This archived website has hundreds of cool cartoons that will have you conducting science experiments with food, light, sound, clothes, and a whole lot more! The creator, Tim Hunkin, trained as an engineer, became a cartoonist and television writer, and now builds interactive exhibits for museums.

When you get to the site, you’ll see a menu of experiments grouped under headings such as: 

  • Food
  • Mathematical
  • Biological
  • Electrical
  • Sound
  • Hobbies
  • Clothes
  • Light
  • and more.

Click on any topic and a new page opens with a menu of experiments in that category. Click on an experiment to see a cartoon illustration with directions on how to conduct it. This is so whimsical and user-friendly, it’s sure to entice even the most reluctant scientist in your family.

Tour Idaho’s Capitol Online

July 7th, 2017

 

It’s Friday, July 7, 2017, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Idaho’s Capitol for Kids

(idahoptv.org/productions/specials/capitoloflight/kids/index.cfm)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Tour Idaho’s Capitol with this website from Idaho Public Education and the Idaho State Board of Education.

To begin your virtual tours, select the “Take a Tour” link on the home page. Then select to either take a video tour or a photo tour. The video tours include: 

  • Tour – Choose to see the full 11-minute tour of the restored Capitol or watch in segments. This tour is also available captioned.
  • 1905-1920 – “Learn what Idaho was like in the early 1900’s, find out who designed and built the original Capitol and discover why Idaho’s Capitol was an early 20th Century modern marvel”.
  • Restoration & Expansion – Explore “the restoration and expansion of Idaho’s Capitol and its hidden and not-so-hidden treasures.”
  • Capitol of Light – PBS documentary of the renovation and expansion of the Capitol.
  • Visions of Idaho –  PBS videos about Idaho history, geography and more.
  • Saved By the Bill – “Learn how an idea becomes law in Idaho”.

When you have finished with your tours return to the “Kids Home” page to learn more about Idaho’s Capitol. Hover over the eagle and click the link to reach the welcome page. Here visitors can download a fun facts sheet and a reference sheet of Idaho’s State Symbols. Select “Play Games” for online games such as: 

  • I Spy Idaho’s Capitol
  • I Spy: The Quiz Game
  • Claim It!
  • Seal of Fortune

Choose the “Teachers” button to find printable versions of the online games and answer keys, web links to the Idaho State Government, other Capitol websites, Idaho history sites, Idaho’s Indian Tribes, and just for fun.

This fun website is a great place to get an overview of Idaho.

Infrared Astronomy

June 20th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, June 20, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Cool Cosmos: Infrared

(coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

Here is another portion of the Cool Cosmos website reviewed last week. At this website, IPAC at Caltech has taken the science of infrared astronomy and made it accessible to students of all ages through a variety of free educational activities, web-tutorials, lessons, videos, experiments and resources that explain the infrared universe.

When you get to the website, you’ll see some features that include: 

  • Infrared World – Find out the role of infrared light in Veterinary Science, Geology, Art, Firefighting, Search and Rescue, Environmental Monitoring, Archaeology and more!
  • Infrared Universe – Discover how infrared light helps scientists explore the solar system, the Milky Way and other galaxies.
  • Infrared Missions and Surveys – Indulge in infrared astronomy through an array of images from telescopes worldwide. You can also explore a gallery of infrared images and check out a timeline on infrared technology.

FREE LESSONS: Be sure to click on “Teachers” on the menu to find free infrared lesson plans, printables, research, resources, and more!

Through this website, you’ll discover that “to study the cool cosmos, infrared light is our window into the heat of the coolest things around.”

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