Posts Tagged ‘light’

Celebrate Pi Day!

March 13th, 2017

 

It’s Monday, March 13, 2017, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Joy of Pi

(www.joyofpi.com/pilinks.html)

Age Range: All (All grades. Parents – preview these sites and select the resources that will be most beneficial to your children.)

 

Tomorrow, March 14, is “World Pi Day” and people everywhere are celebrating the mathematical symbol Pi (the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter or 3.14159…).

Celebrate all week long with activities that enhance students’ understanding of all that is circular.

A companion to the book, “The Joy of Pi,” this website offers a terrific, comprehensive and current archive of links to information and resources all about Pi, including FREE downloadable lessons and activities. Learn the history of Pi, how to calculate Pi, and many other unique, fun, and innovative ways to investigate Pi for students of all ages.


Here’s another resource:


MEGSL (Math Educators of Greater St. Louis)

(megsl.org/pi.html)


A collection of pi facts, resources, and free downloadable lessons and activities. The site also maintains an archive of links to Pi math problems, discussions, and unique, fun, and innovative ways to investigate Pi for students of all ages.

BONUS! 

Albert Einstein for Kids

(http://www.albert-einstein.org/.index6.html)


Tomorrow is also Albert Einstein’s birthday! At this site you will find links to explore every stage of Einstein’s life. To get your kids interested in Einstein consider telling them that he was a genius – but that he didn’t talk until he was 3, he hated school and thought it was boring, he left school at 15 because of bad grades, and he wanted to study at the university but couldn’t pass the entrance exam! Nevertheless, at age 26 he published the Theory of Relativity, the quantum theory of light, and proved that energy and matter are linked in the physics relationship of E=MC².

Free Science Activities & Videos

January 31st, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 31, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Siemens Science Day

(www.siemensscienceday.com/index.cfm)

Age Range: 8-11 (Grades 4-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website provides some terrific science lessons, activities and tools. It will also inspire scientific curiosity – not only for kids, but even for parents who aren’t keen in science.

This site is designed for grades 4-6, but don’t let that stop you from exploring what the site has to offer with younger and older students. NOTE: You do have to register to download the lessons in pdf format and to watch the videos. Registration is free and requires the email address and phone number of your school along with information about what subjects and grades you teach. As home educators, we simply supplied a school name (make one up if you don’t already have one), home address, and checked off that we teach all grades and subjects.

When you get to the site you’ll see a brief introduction. Below it is a menu of lessons and fun activities divided into three categories: 

  • Earth Science – Learn about weather, measure the effects of elasticity, and map the ocean, etc.
  • Life Science – Explore the 5 senses, learn the difference between fruits and vegetables, discover how scientists classify organisms, etc.
  • Physical Science – Construct a spectroscope and observe the spectra of various sources of light, discover how different materials absorb solar energy, and use paper chromatography to separate the colors in dyes used to color candies, etc.

Click on any one and a new page opens where you will find: 

  • A brief summary and the objectives of the science lesson/activity
  • A “Download” button to access the lesson in pdf format
  • A video screen where you can watch a video about the lesson
  • A difficulty rating from 1-5 (easy to hard).

Download and fill out a certificate of completion when through.

So, gather the kids around the computer to watch fascinating film clips and learn about the classification system, the three types of matter, parts of a plant cell, the properties of acids and bases, and much more!

Mad Scientist Experiments for All Ages

January 3rd, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 3, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Reeko’s Mad Scientist Lab: Experiments

(reekoscience.com/category/science-experiments)

Age Range: All (There’s something for everyone here with parental assistance and supervision.)

 

This ad-supported website is a treasure trove of free, fun, and fascinating science experiments that will bring out the “mad scientist” in everyone.

When you get to the site, there are 9 pages of science experiments that you can click on directly. Or you can hover your mouse over “Science Experiments” and click on the category of interest: 

  • Atomic/Electric
  • Chemical Reactions
  • Chemistry Experiments
  • Cohesion
  • Flotation
  • Geometry and Math
  • Inertia/Momentum
  • Light and Vision
  • Miscellaneous Science Experiments
  • Motion/Energy
  • Pressure
  • Sound and Vibrations

You’ll find a complete description of the experiment, instructions on how to conduct it, and a list of the materials you will need. You also get an explanation of the scientific principles that govern the experiment.

From the traditional experiments of science fairs such as making a volcano or a lemon battery, to more unusual projects like making a cloud in a bottle or starting a fire with water – your whole family will have fun learning from the science activities at this site.

Don’t miss the “Fun Stuff” section where you will find puzzles, fun activities using encrypted messages, games, and science trivia.

Bookmark this site for access to science learning year ’round!

Science Postcards

November 8th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, November 8, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Science Postcards

(www.sciencepostcards.com/)

Age Range: 6-10 (Grades 1-5, with parental supervision)

 

Today’s website from New Zealand encourages development of scientific exploration through children’s literature. The idea is to read one of the recommended books, and then the “teacher” sends a “Science Postcard” themed around that book title to a student. Upon receiving the postcard, the student is inspired to engage in a science activity that relates to the book they just read. The science activity is downloadable/printable at the Science Postcard website after registering.

There are eight, free science postcards and activities that include: 

  1. Book Title: Duck in the Truck – Science Activity: “Science Friction” (Forces)
  2. Book Title: Sidewalk Circus – Science Activity: “Shadow Secrets” (Light)
  3. Book Title: Cork on the Ocean – Science Activity: “Traffic Light Straws” (Density)
  4. Book Title: The King’s Bubbles – Science Activity: “Bubble Magic” (Forces)
  5. Book Title: Tarawera’s Pink Terrace Children – Science Activity: “Fiery Eruptions” (Volcanoes)
  6. Book Title: Mrs. McGinty and the Bizarre Plant – Science Activity: “Flight for Life” (Seeds)
  7. Book Title: Ruby Sings the Blues – Science Activity: “No to Noise” (Sound)
  8. Book Title: Bright Star – Science Activity: Moon Strike (Space)

All of the Science Postcards are available for free at the site. The Teacher and Pupil notes for the first book mentioned above, “Cork on the Ocean,” and the Science activity “Traffic Light Straws” are available free (without registering). All other Teacher and Pupil notes can be downloaded for free, once you have registered on the site.

We registered and noticed that you MUST fill out the “comment” field in order to complete the registration. We simply typed, “Thanks.” That did the job.

Of course, it wouldn’t be necessary to print out a postcard and send it to your children – you could simply do the activities. On the other hand, it might be fun to send the postcard to them (kids love to get mail). Or, you could place one in a conspicuous place somewhere in the house where they are sure to see it and wonder what it is.

This is a fun way to engage kids in science projects that tie into the books they enjoy reading.

Tour Tocqueville’s 1831 America

July 15th, 2016

 

It’s Friday, July 15, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Democracy in America

(xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/DETOC/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

Today’s website provides the full text (that you can read online or print out to read offline) of Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville – one of the most influential works on the politics and culture of America in 1831-1832.

As the website introduction explains:

What he saw there, who he talked with, what he read and overheard, became the stuff of his analysis of our nation’s essential nature and probable destiny. And almost everything he saw and heard has, of course, simply vanished…. Cincinnati is no longer a frontier boom town and the trackless wilderness of Tennessee has been comfortably suburbanized and malled along with the rest of the country….

And so we’re attempting to construct a virtual American ca. 1831-32…. based on Tocqueville’s itinerary, on his and his friend Beaumont’s letters and journals, on contemporaneous accounts of other foreign visitors, and on a variety of examples of material culture of the period, mostly paintings and engravings. It also holds explorations of Women’s Place at the time, of attitudes toward race and color, towards religion, and towards everyday life.

Democracy in America gives keen insight to life in the United States in the early/mid-19th century.

In addition to the text, the site offers an interesting VIRTUAL TOUR of Tocqueville’s America in 1831, through featured textual excerpts, illustrations, pictures, and more. It’s a great way to preview the book and get a peek at American culture over 150 years ago. The virtual tour alone provides an interesting social studies lesson.

When you get to the site you will see a map in the center of the screen. Above it is a link to the full text of the book and an introduction to the website.

A menu surrounds the map. The Virtual Tour is the first link on the menu on the left-hand side of your screen. It is followed by links to various other highlights based on the book including: 

  • Red, Black & White: Race in 1831
  • Everyday Life in 1831
  • American Religion in 1831
  • American Women: 1820-1842
  • and much more.

This is a fascinating historical account of life in America that sheds light on our past while illuminating the stark contrasts to present day America. After exploring the site, you can’t help but speculate what the future will bring.

Online Elementary Songbook

July 9th, 2016

 

It’s Saturday, July 9, 2016, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Utah State Office of Education: Elementary Songbook

(www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/fineart/Elementary/Songbook/Music.aspx)

Age Range:  5-11 (Grades K-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website, sponsored by the Utah State Office of Education, offers a free online songbook with lesson plans for teaching elementary music education.

When you get to the site you’ll see menu of songs that include children’s favorites such as: 

  • A Tisket, A Tasket
  • Bingo
  • Clementine
  • Down in the Valley
  • Going to the Zoo
  • Hot Cross Buns
  • Itsy Bitsy Spider
  • Kum Ba Yah
  • Take Me Out to the Ball Game
  • This Little Light of Mine
  • and many, many more!

Click on any song and a new page opens where you will find the sheet music, lyrics, suggested activities, ideas for playing instruments, curriculum tie-ins, and more. There’s a complete lesson plan for each song listed. There are also audio files to listen to that accompany the song. Scroll further down the page to find “Movement/Dance Options” which provide dance suggestions for various songs.

While this online songbook was created with classroom teachers in mind, it can be easily tweaked for use in the homeschool or unschool environment as well.

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