Posts Tagged ‘Library of Congress’

Historical Music from the Library of Congress

August 11th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, August 11, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Library of Congress: National Jukebox

(www.loc.gov/jukebox/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision. NOTE: See warning below.)

 

The Library of Congress provides a “National Jukebox” that makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge.

This exhibit transforms your computer into a gramophone featuring more than 10,000 78rpm disc recordings issued by the Victor Talking Machine Company between 1900 and 1925. You can listen to a broad range of songs including marching band music, novelty tunes, hits from musical theater productions, dance tunes, and opera arias. You’ll also find spoken recordings.

When you get to the site, you’ll see the music audio player – and just above it this: 

WARNING: Historical recordings may contain offensive language.

These music selections are presented as part of the record of the past. They are historical documents which reflect the attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs of people in a very different time period. For that reason, they may contain content that is offensive to users. As always, PARENTS SHOULD PREVIEW THE SITE and supervise all Internet activity.

Once you get past the disclaimer, look below the audio player to find a menu of featured recordings and playlists. Use the menu in the left margin that includes: 

  • Browse all Recordings – Search by language, target audience, record label, date range, composer, lyricist, performer and genre.
  • Artists – Browse the artists from A-Z. Find recordings by music greats such as opera singer Enrico Caruso, Broadway legends Al Jolson and Fanny Brice, whistling virtuoso Charles Kellogg, composer and band leader John Philip Sousa, and thousands more.
  • Genres – Find a wide selection of genres of music including classical, opera, religious, popular music, blues, ethnic music, humorous songs, etc.

This is an AMAZING musical resource that takes time to explore. Bookmark it to return often.

Books That Shaped America’s History

August 1st, 2018

 

It’s Wednesday, August 1, 2018, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Library of Congress: Books That Shaped America

(www.loc.gov/exhibits/books-that-shaped-america/overview.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

The Library of Congress has an exhibition called “Books That Shaped America” that highlights books that have had a historical impact on the lives of Americans through the ages.

The titles featured are by American authors and as the website explains, “Some of the titles on display have been the source of great controversy, even derision, yet they nevertheless shaped Americans’ views of their world and often the world’s view of the United States.” The Library of Congress encourages visitors to read the books exhibited to explore the breadth and depth of America’s literary tradition
 
This online exhibit presents a unique opportunity to identify books of historical importance by era. When you get to the site, you’ll see a menu of each era including: 

  • 1750 to 1800 – Find book titles such as: Experiments and Observations on Electricity by Benjamin Franklin, Common Sense by Thomas Paine, The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, and even the first American cookbook.
  • 1800 to 1850 – You’ll find Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a book featuring papers written by Lewis & Clark about their great expedition, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. You’ll discover why these books were of great historical importance.
  • 1850 to 1900 – The titles here will most likely be much more familiar and include: The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Moby-Dick by Herman Melville, Walden by Henry David Thoreau, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and many more.
  • 1900 to 1950 – Book titles you’ll recognize include: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, Jack London’s The Call of the Wild, Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and more.
  • 1950 to 2000 – Discover Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, The Double Helix by James D. Watson, The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss, Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, etc.

Click on any era and a new page opens that explains what each book is about and why it is historically significant. Some of the explanations are thought provoking – and could stimulate lots of discussion.
 
You might want to copy the titles and use them as a guide the next time you head to the library for a good read.

Become a History Detective

November 17th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, November 17, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Historical Scene Investigation

(hsionline.org/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website provides social studies students with the opportunity to become virtual history detectives through investigating primary source documents.

Students investigate prepared “case files” about historical events by examining primary source materials archived at this website. Through these “journals, diaries, artifacts, historic sites, works of art, quantitative data, and other evidence from the past” they compare the multiple points of view of those on the scene at the time.

Developed in partnership with the College of William & Mary School of Education, University of Kentucky School of Education, and the Library of Congress, H.S.I. is an effort to take students beyond textbook facts and give them “experiences that more closely resemble the work of a real historian.”

When you get to the website you’ll see a menu that offers information about the H.S.I. Project and a link to the “Investigations” that include: 

  • Jamestown Starving Time
  • Bacon’s Rebellion
  • The Boston “Massacre”
  • Lexington & Concord
  • Constitution Controversy
  • Antonio A Slave
  • Finding Aaron
  • Children in the Civil War
  • School Desegregation
  • Dropping the Bomb
  • Case of Sam Smiley
  • March on Frankfort
  • When Elvis Met Nixon

Click on any “case file” and a new page opens with a description of the historic event and a question for the student to answer through investigating documents. Click on “Student View” to read the documents and access a series of questions that guide the student in analyzing the information in order to crack the case.

Today in History

October 6th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, October 6, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Library of Congress – Today in History

(www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Discover what happened today in history at this this website from the Library of Congress.

When clicking on today’s link, the date should automatically be added to the end of the URL taking you to the highlighted events of the day. Looking for a specific date? No problem. Use the “Select date” field to enter your desired date and click go. Each entry includes: 

  • Information about the event or person
  • Relevant images
  • Links to “Learn More” about the subject.

There are links throughout the text as well to dig even deeper.

This is a neat resource to add to your daily history lessons.

History and Social Studies and More, Oh My!

September 29th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, September 29, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Kids.gov

(kids.usa.gov/index.shtml)

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

This sister website to the USA.gov website, designed especially for elementary and middle school students, serves as an internet gateway to educational information and services available through government agencies, schools, and educational organizations.

Using the navigation buttons at the top of the page, first decide your audience, Kids Grade K-5 or Teens Grade 6-8, then choose to:

  • Learn Stuff
  • Play Games
  • Watch Videos

This is where the fun begins. Choose from the suggestions in the scroll-able upper menu box or find the subject you are interested in by selecting it from the icons below the box. The icons will take you to another page broken down into topics. From here either browse through the list of linked websites or click the topical text link to be taken to the page of links.

All kinds of subjects are available, but we will focus on History. On the “Learn More” tab find great resources to learn about: 

  • American History
  • Constitution, Declaration of Independence and More
  • Groups and Cultures
  • Presidents
  • Time Periods and Eras
  • Wars

History games include: 

  • America by Air – Among other activities, take a virtual flight across America.
  • Colonial Williamsburg Kid’s Zone – Games that teach about life in colonial America
  • History and Culture – Smithsonian Education – a selection of games sponsored by the Smithsonian
  • And many more!

Watch videos about: 

  • Native American Indians
  • Martha Washington
  • Webcasts from the Library of Congress

(Note: While reviewing this site we found some links no longer took you directly to the right page, but adventurous researchers can dig a little on the site to locate what they need.)

Select the Teachers button in the top menu to find activities, worksheets, lesson plans and more. The Parents page provides parental resources for a subject.

This is definitely a bookmark-worthy site to come back time and again for all your subjects.

Library of Congress: Lewis & Clark Exhibit

June 10th, 2016

 

It’s Friday, June 10, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Library of Congress: Lewis & Clark Exhibit

(www.loc.gov/exhibits/lewisandclark/virtualtour/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

With this website, explore the Northwest Gallery of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress to discover maps, notes, manuscripts, and more from the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Begin your tour by selecting the “enter tour” link on the first slide. Watch the slide show introduction then the tour begins. In each slide, select an image in the timeline to enlarge. Read through the text then click on the image to get a larger view. Select “Go Back” at the bottom of the slide to return to the timeline. Some images will open a new window with a presentation on the Library of Congress website. Simply close the window to return to the virtual tour. Select “Continue Tour” to move along. Sections of the timeline include: 

  • Prologue
  • Before Lewis & Clark
    • Beyond the Allegheny Mountains
    • The Spanish Entrada into the Southwest
    • Exploration of the Missouri River
    • British Passage to the Pacific
    • Louisiana Purchase
  • Lewis & Clark
    • Discovering Diplomacy
    • Geography
    • Animals
    • Dressed in Courage
    • Plants
  • After Lewis & Clark
    • The Journeys of Zebulon Montgomery PikeLong’s Expedition to the Central and Southern Plains
    • The Fur Trade
    • Wilkes and Frémont Expeditions
    • Boundary Surveys
    • Epilogue-Transcontinental Railroad Surveys

If you prefer not to use the interactive tour, visit the Rivers, Edens, Empires webpage on the Library of Congress site using the link under the interactive tour window.

Not only is this an interesting tour of the artifacts in the museum, but a wonderful addition to your westward expansion studies.

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