Posts Tagged ‘kids’

Learn How Cars are Made

April 13th, 2018

 

It’s Friday, April 13, 2018, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Toyota Children’s Web Site

(www.toyota.co.jp/en/kids/car/index.html)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Start your engines of learning with this page on the larger children’s website from Toyota.

Through illustrated diagrams, texts, images, and animations, visitors will discover what is involved in the process of making an automobile.

There are a couple of ways to take your tour. Either use the flow chart image or the left side bar menu to navigate through the various steps of making a car: 

  • Research and Development of New Cars
    • Planning
    • Design, Planning, and Manufacture of Prototypes
    • Numerous Tests
  • Production and Sales
    • First Steps
    • Stamping
    • Welding
    • Painting
    • Making the Engine
    • Suppliers
    • Assembly
    • Inspections
    • Transportation
    • Sales

There is also a link to see a “video clip of production in action,” but when reviewing the site, our browsers did not pull it up as it said it was unsecure. However, the link to the video can be watched on YouTube here with no problem.


After going through the tour, check out the other parts of this children’s website to learn about environmentally-friendly and people-friendly automobiles as well as more about the Toyota Motor Company.

We also located a 5-minute video tour of the Toyota Plant in Georgetown, Kentucky to add to your virtual field trip. This advertising video presentation provides an overview of the manufacturing plant in Kentucky and an overview of the assembly process.

Free “Citizen Science” Projects for You

April 10th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, April 10, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

SciStarter

(www.scistarter.com/)

Age Range: 6 and up (Grade 1 and up; children with parental supervision)

 

This website provides an archive of  “Citizen Scientist” projects that you and your kids can do at home to help researchers gather information on bees, birds, crickets, storms, solar energy, microbiomes, and much, much more.

You’ll learn all about science as you take part in both informal recreational activities and formal research efforts that make science simple and fun for the whole family.

At the top of the site, you’ll see that April 14, 2018 is Citizen Science Day! See if there are any events near you.

Or scroll down to see the featured projects. You can also “Find a Project” by location and topic. Select a subject of interest such as: animals, astronomy  space, birds, chemistry, climate & weather, food, health & medicine, insects & pollinators, nature & outdoors, physics, etc. Click on any item on the drop-down menu and a new page opens with a list of projects currently available in that category. You can do an advanced search from the next screen that allows you to filter for: 

  • Projects you can do online, outdoors, indoors
  • Projects suitable for different age groups

And you can even filter for projects that have classroom materials available.
 
From the home page you can also sign up to receive their free “newsletter” that delivers information about awesome projects to your email inbox.

Folk Music and Dance for Kids

April 7th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, April 7, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Utah State Board of Education: So Why Music?

(www.schools.utah.gov/curr/finearts/elementarysongs)

Age Range: 4-12 (Grades PreK-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website by the Utah Office of Education encourages learning Fine Arts to “enable students to express their feelings, communicate thoughts, explore their creativity, solve problems, communicate ideas, develop a sense of community, and appreciate themselves as participants in history, tradition, and culture.”

To that end they offer a free music catalog of downloadable song files (mp3), sheet music with lyrics, and dance instructions that accompany some of the songs.

When you get to the site you’ll see the Elementary Songbook Music Catalog with a menu of traditional children’s music and folk song titles that include: 

  • “A Tisket, A Tasket”
  • “Bingo”
  • “Buffalo Gals”
  • “Down By the Bay”
  • “Going to the Zoo”
  • “If You’re Happy”
  • “Old MacDonald”
  • “Take Me Out To the Ball Game”
  • “You Are My Sunshine”
  • “Yankee Doodle”

And many more titles that you’re sure to recognize.

Plus, you’ll find a menu of Movement/Dance Options that include free, printable instructions for folk dances you can do as you listen to the songs. You’ll discover: 

  • A simple line dance in a middle eastern style
  • A couple dance after the style of French Canadian step dancing
  • A simple circle dance in the style of “big circle mountain” dancing
  • A contemporary American country line dance for sets of 3
  • A Latin American line dance popular at Carnival
  • A circle dance adaptation of traditional Native American style
  • A square dance in traditional formation
  • A simple variation of the traditional Virginia reel in long sets

This is a terrific resource to help your kids learn songs of historical and cultural significance. You can learn the dance steps too, and it might be a great project for a homeschool support group or scout troop.

Folk Music and Dance for Kids

April 7th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, April 7, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Utah State Board of Education: So Why Music?

(www.schools.utah.gov/curr/finearts/elementarysongs)

Age Range: 4-12 (Grades PreK-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website by the Utah Office of Education encourages learning Fine Arts to “enable students to express their feelings, communicate thoughts, explore their creativity, solve problems, communicate ideas, develop a sense of community, and appreciate themselves as participants in history, tradition, and culture.”

To that end they offer a free music catalog of downloadable song files (mp3), sheet music with lyrics, and dance instructions that accompany some of the songs.

When you get to the site you’ll see the Elementary Songbook Music Catalog with a menu of traditional children’s music and folk song titles that include: 

  • “A Tisket, A Tasket”
  • “Bingo”
  • “Buffalo Gals”
  • “Down By the Bay”
  • “Going to the Zoo”
  • “If You’re Happy”
  • “Old MacDonald”
  • “Take Me Out To the Ball Game”
  • “You Are My Sunshine”
  • “Yankee Doodle”

And many more titles that you’re sure to recognize.

Plus, you’ll find a menu of Movement/Dance Options that include free, printable instructions for folk dances you can do as you listen to the songs. You’ll discover: 

  • A simple line dance in a middle eastern style
  • A couple dance after the style of French Canadian step dancing
  • A simple circle dance in the style of “big circle mountain” dancing
  • A contemporary American country line dance for sets of 3
  • A Latin American line dance popular at Carnival
  • A circle dance adaptation of traditional Native American style
  • A square dance in traditional formation
  • A simple variation of the traditional Virginia reel in long sets

This is a terrific resource to help your kids learn songs of historical and cultural significance. You can learn the dance steps too, and it might be a great project for a homeschool support group or scout troop.

Help Reluctant Readers with Cartoons

April 4th, 2018

 

It’s Wednesday, April 4, 2018, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Rudiments of Wisdom Encyclopedia

(www.rudimentsofwisdom.com/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Many have found comics and cartoons a great motivator for reluctant readers. This website contains researched, comic-style illustrated facts about “almost everything there is to know!”

When you get to the site, you’ll see a menu with topics that include: 

  • animals
  • art & architecture
  • biology
  • geography & geology
  • language
  • medicine
  • music
  • plants
  • psychology
  • science
  • and more!

Click on any one, and a new page opens with an index of choices in that category. For example, the “Language” section includes cartoons about grammar, nursery rhymes, phrases, slang, surnames, and writing. Your kids will find gems such as: 

  • When to use “I” or “me”
  • The stories behind familiar nursery rhymes such as “Little Jack Horner” and “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
  • The origin of phrases such as “pig in a poke” and “mad as a hatter.”

Kids relish learning things their parents don’t know and this website features odd tidbits and obscure facts in every category. There is no correct sequence for browsing this site. You (or your child) simply pick topics of interest to browse, rather like an encyclopedia.

One gratifying result of having your child visit this site is the number of times he or she will call out, “Mom, did you know this?” or “Look at this one!”

And don’t be surprised if many of the facts learned on this site pop up in later conversation as well. (Some folks refer to this as “retention,” a phenomenon that seems to occur more frequently when the material is interesting and fun.)

Free Kids’ History Videos

March 29th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, March 29, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Brookdale House – History Videos for Kids

(brookdalehouse.com/history-videos-for-kids/)

Age Range: 7-13 (Grades 2-8, with parental supervision)

 

This section of the curriculum publisher’s website (Brookdale House) provides a collection of hundreds of YouTube videos to use to supplement your history studies.

The videos are sorted into four time period collections: 

  • Ancient History
  • Medieval History
  • Early Modern History
  • Modern History

When arriving at today’s link, it is helpful to read through the information to understand what has been included in the collections as well as tips for watching.


Visitors can move between time periods using the right-hand menu or the home page of this section.


Once you have decided on a time-period to browse, use your mouse to hover over the images to see the name or content of the video. Click the image and the video player will open on the page. Click anywhere off the video to return to the page you were on. Types of videos include: 

  • Documentaries and re-enactments
  • Lectures
  • Songs for learning facts
  • Audio readings
  • Clips from modern events
  • And much more

While the selection of videos is targeted for elementary and middle school age students, they could easily benefit the older student as well.

As always, be sure to preview the videos for suitability for your family.

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