Posts Tagged ‘inventions’

Energy Lessons, Printables, & Activities for K-12

March 14th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, March 14, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Energy Kids

(www.eia.gov/kids/energy.cfm?page=6)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website, sponsored by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, provides free energy-related lessons, printables, games, and activities designed for classroom use in grades K-12. (They can be tweaked for use in the homeschool environment.)

When you get to the website you’ll see a menu under the banner “For Teachers” that includes: 

  • Lesson Plans for grades K-3, 4-7, 6-9, and 9-12
  • Teacher Guide with tips on extension activities
  • Career Corner to explore jobs in the Energy field
  • Science Fair Experiments
  • Field Trips with ideas for taking trips to power plants, etc.
  • Related Links to resources and energy websites

Once you’ve explored the “For Teachers” section check out the menu in the left margin of the page that offers: 

  • What is Energy? – Learn energy basics including its forms, how it’s measured, and what it has to do with the periodic table of elements.
  • Energy Sources – Discover renewable and non-renewable energy, electricity, hydrogen, and the latest energy stats.
  • Using & Saving Energy – Learn how energy is used at home, work, in industry, transportation, and more.
  • History of Energy – Check out the time line of energy inventions including Coal, Electricity, Ethanol, Geothermal, Hydropower, Natural Gas, Oil, Wind, and more. You can also read biographies of people who developed scientific breakthroughs with energy including Celsius, Curie, Edison, Einstein, Faraday, Joule, Marconi, Newton, Oppenheimer and more.
  • Games & Activities – Enjoy riddles, puzzles, science experiments, and take a quiz to test your energy IQ.

Where Science Meets Fiction

August 3rd, 2016

 

It’s Wednesday, August 3, 2016, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

TechNovelgy – Where Science Meets Fiction

(technovelgy.com/)

Age Range: 10 and up (Grades 5 and up; children with parental supervision – see note below).

 

This website offers a free archive that enables you to explore the inventions and predictions of science fiction writers that have come true or are coming true in today’s world. There are over 2,000 different inventions archived that were first introduced through the imaginations of science fiction writers.

When you get to the site you can explore the featured items on the home page, or use the menu at the top of the page to search by Glossary, Author, Book, or Timeline. Once you find a topic that interests you, click on it and a new page opens. That page may contain some or all of the following: 

  • A blurb from the novel mentioning the invention or idea
  • Commentary about the idea including comparisons and similarities to other sci-fi technology mentioned in other novels, television shows, and movies
  • Links to science articles that discuss the current development of these inventions and ideas in today’s world
  • Links to real-world video demonstrations of the inventions
  • Links to websites with further information.

If this doesn’t generate interest in reading a sci-fi novel, we don’t know what will. It will also springboard students to want to learn more about science and technology.

NOTE: We only reviewed a sampling of what’s available at this website, so AS ALWAYS, parents should preview and supervise their children’s exploration – not only to determine the suitability of content on the Technovelgy website, but because the links take you to other websites that we have not reviewed. 

One more piece of advice: Read the FAQs (see link at the bottom of the homepage). We found them to be helpful and we think you will too.

Discover the Original Information Highway

July 28th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, July 28, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Transatlantic Cable Communications

(epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/205/301/ic/cdc/cable/contents.htm)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Today’s website explores Canada’s historic part in transatlantic communications. You can hear the story of the official first transatlantic cable message (Queen Victoria to President Buchanan), as well as listen in on bits of history such as the distress call from the Titanic!


When you get to the site you will see a menu that includes: 

  • Introduction – Get a brief overview of the history of the electric telegraph and why the locations of Canso and Hazel Hill on the Atlantic coast of Canada were critical to utilizing this technology.
  • Science – Learn about the invention of the telegraph and how the resin from the Gutta-Percha tree provided just the right properties for suitable insulation to waterproof underwater cables. Explore the science of telegraphy and discover Morse Code. Virtually examine the parts of a telegraph machine. Find out about other great inventions that were a result of the “Cable Era.”
  • History – Read an in-depth history of telegraphy and its socio-economic impact. Find out what the life of a telegrapher was like, and listen to some of the famous messages sent and received via telegraph – including the distress message of the ill-fated ship, Titanic.
  • Media Gallery – See photographs, watch video clips, and visit the sound studio to explore telegraphy.
  • Resource Center – Take a multiple choice quiz to test your knowledge of telegraphy, print out a fun telegraphy-themed word-search puzzle, and discover more links to Internet resources on telegraphy.

The Secret Life of Machines

April 26th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, April 26, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Secret Life of Machines

(www.secretlifeofmachines.com/index.shtml)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Engineer and cartoonist Tim Hunkin developed a series of cartoons with simple explanations about how machines work. Tim’s unique take on explaining the mystery behind the mechanisms, resulted in a TV series that allowed him to further develop the explanations with more in-depth cartoons. These cartoons are featured on today’s website.

When you get to the site you’ll see a brief introduction and then a menu of cartoon topics that includes: 

  • elevators
  • fax machines
  • internal combustion engines
  • refrigerators
  • sewing machines
  • telephones
  • televisions
  • vacuum cleaners
  • video recorders
  • washing machines
  • word processors
  • and many more!

Click on any one and enjoy reading the cartoons that explain how these machines work.

They made a series of videos from the cartoons that demonstrate the history and inventions of modern conveniences and other machines. They are really fun to watch and are housed by the Exploratorium website here. (You need to have QuickTime installed to view the videos.)

Samples of the videos are also on other sites such as Google Video and YouTube and you’ll find the links here.

Science with Leonardo da Vinci!

April 12th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, April 12, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Museum of Science – Exploring Leonardo

(www.mos.org/sln/Leonardo/)

Age Range: 9-14 (Designed with grades 4-8 in mind, with parental supervision. Students of all ages will enjoy aspects of this site.)

 

Leonardo da Vinci died on May 2, 1519. Born in 1452, he painted the Mona Lisa, invented the diving bell, and designed the airplane, helicopter and parachute. The Boston Museum of Science offers this free online exhibit with activities to explore the life, times, and scientific inventions of DaVinci.

When you get to the site you’ll see an introduction and a menu that includes: 

  • Inventor’s Workshop – Explore Leonardo’s fascination with machines and how they work including: 
    • Wheel and Axles
    • Pulley System
    • Screw
    • Lever
    • Gears

You’ll also learn about Leonardo’s interest in gadgets. Use your imagination to sketch a gadget and invent a useful machine. Take a quiz to see if you can identify Leonardo’s machines from his sketches.

  • Leonardo’s Perspective – Discover painting in the Middle Ages and learn about techniques of linear perspective.
  • Become Leonardo’s virtual apprentice to play with size and distance and investigate aerial perspective.
  • Leonardo: Right to Left – Find out how to do “mirror writing” and generate a hypotheses about da Vinci’s reasons for writing backwards.
  • What, Where, When? – Take a virtual tour of Italy in the 15th century and find out what life was like in Rome, Florence, Milan, and Venice.

This is an engaging online presentation that demonstrates how Leonardo da Vinci creatively applied the scientific method in every aspect of life.

The Electric Ben Franklin

September 4th, 2015

 

It’s Tuesday, July 28, 2015, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

The Electric Ben Franklin

(http://www.ushistory.org/franklin/info/index.htm)

 

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

This ad-supported website offers a wealth of information and fun trivia on the subject of Benjamin Franklin!
When you get to the website, use the menu on the left side of the screen to explore: 
  • A Timeline of Franklin’s Life with notable historic events and achievement
  • Franklin’s Inventions – including bifocal glasses, electricity, the lightning rod, a Franklin stove, a map of the Gulf Stream, swim fins, odometer – and find out what he didn’t invent too!
  • Franklin’s Entire Autobiography including an account of his famous kite experiment
You can also read an original work of historical fiction called Temple’s Diary in which a 15-year-old boy discovers that he is the grandson of Benjamin Franklin!
Explore Philadelphia and Franklin’s old haunts. Read his wise and wonderful sayings. You’ll even find experiments to do at home along with interactive games that help to explain the concepts of Franklin’s many discoveries.

This is a wonderful unit study online that will appeal to the whole family – don’t miss it!

Note: This website is part of the larger USHistory.org site. Be sure to visit the home page to see all that this site has to offer.

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