Posts Tagged ‘homeschool’

Free K-12 Math Videos & Games

April 30th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, April 30, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Math Pickle

(www.mathpickle.com/)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

This is one of the most innovative math sites we’ve seen. A Canadian mathematician/teacher developed this site to help classroom teachers address the multiple math skill levels of students through challenging and engaging activities and games that are demonstrated with slide shows or videos.

All of it can be tweaked for use in the homeschool environment. When you get to the site, click on “All Puzzles” then choose the grade level of interest to you. You can also switch to the subject menu.

  • In grades K-2 – Enjoy math games that teach patterns, skip counting, addition, symmetry, and more.
  • In grades 3-4 – Play dot-to-dot measuring puzzles, learn subtraction, Fibonacci numbers, and more.
  • In grades 5-6 – Practice division, discover prime numbers, practice factoring, and more.
  • In grades 7-9 – Enjoy a game of “Integral Fission,” practice multiplying fractions, engage in cipher breaking, do puzzles to learn about polygons, area, logic, and more.
  • In grades 10-12 – Play games and solve puzzles that teach algebra, scientific notation, probability, and more.

Click on any topic and a new page opens where you can click through the slides or watch a demonstration video.

What an incredible range of free math activities! Bookmark this site to return often.

Learn about Famous Homeschoolers

April 19th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, April 19, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

FamousHomeschoolers.net

(www.famoushomeschoolers.net/)

Age Range: 7-18 (Grades 2-12, with parental supervision)

 

Discover well-known people who were homeschooled or who homeschooled their children with this site from Knowledge House and author Teri Ann Berg Nelson.

After reading the introduction and learning the definition of who is considered a “homeschooler,” use the left-hand side bar menu to explore lists of famous homeschoolers sorted by category: 

  • Artists – Claude Monet, Grandma Moses, Leonardo da Vinci and more
  • Athletes – includes Bethany Hamilton, Timothy Tebow, Michelle Kwan among others
  • Authors – on this list are Louisa May Alcott, J.R.R Tolkien, Mark Twain and many others
  • Composers – This list has 13 well-know composers such as Bach, Mozart, Irving Berlin, and John Phillip Sousa.
  • Educators – George Washington Carver, Charlotte Mason, and Noah Webster are included on this list.
  • Entertainers – Notable people on this list include Charlie Chaplin, Alan Alda, LeAnne Rimes, and many more.
  • Entrepreneurs – Among others, you will find Andrew Carnegie, Joseph Pulitzer, and Dave Thomas on this list.
  • Explorers – Daniel Boone, Sir Ernest Shackleton, Lewis and Clark and a few more make this short list.
  • Founding Fathers – See which signers of the Declaration and Constitutional Convention delegates homeschooled.
  • Inventors – Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, the Wright Brothers and more make up this list.
  • Medical Practitioners – includes Clara Barton, Elizabeth Blackwell, and Albert Schweitzer as well as others
  • Military Officers – Joan of Arc, Stonewall Jackson, Douglas MacArthur, George Patton and more
  • Others – This list includes those not in the other categories such as Ansel Adams, Amelia Earhart, Frank Lloyd Wright, Darrell Waltrip, Will Rogers, Annie Oakley and many more
  • Presidents – includes most of our first 11 presidents as well as Lincoln, Johnson, Garfield, Cleveland, Wilson, and both Roosevelts
  • Religious Leaders – David Livingstone, Dwight L. Moody, John and Charles Wesley are notables on this list.
  • Scientists – There are many scientists on this list including Albert Einstein, Fred Hoyle, Isaac Newton.
  • Statesmen – included on this list are Davy Crockett, Patrick Henry, Winston Churchill and more.
  • Famous Parents – On this list you will find people who homeschooled their children such as Garth Brooks, Kirk Cameron, Michael P. Farris, Tim Hawkins, Chuck Norris, Jimmy Wales and many more.

Highlighted and underlined names on the lists are links to mini biographies of that person. This site could be a great starting point for your students to learn more about the lives of others who were homeschooled or homeschool just like them.

Folk Music and Dance for Kids

April 7th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, April 7, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Utah State Board of Education: So Why Music?

(www.schools.utah.gov/curr/finearts/elementarysongs)

Age Range: 4-12 (Grades PreK-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website by the Utah Office of Education encourages learning Fine Arts to “enable students to express their feelings, communicate thoughts, explore their creativity, solve problems, communicate ideas, develop a sense of community, and appreciate themselves as participants in history, tradition, and culture.”

To that end they offer a free music catalog of downloadable song files (mp3), sheet music with lyrics, and dance instructions that accompany some of the songs.

When you get to the site you’ll see the Elementary Songbook Music Catalog with a menu of traditional children’s music and folk song titles that include: 

  • “A Tisket, A Tasket”
  • “Bingo”
  • “Buffalo Gals”
  • “Down By the Bay”
  • “Going to the Zoo”
  • “If You’re Happy”
  • “Old MacDonald”
  • “Take Me Out To the Ball Game”
  • “You Are My Sunshine”
  • “Yankee Doodle”

And many more titles that you’re sure to recognize.

Plus, you’ll find a menu of Movement/Dance Options that include free, printable instructions for folk dances you can do as you listen to the songs. You’ll discover: 

  • A simple line dance in a middle eastern style
  • A couple dance after the style of French Canadian step dancing
  • A simple circle dance in the style of “big circle mountain” dancing
  • A contemporary American country line dance for sets of 3
  • A Latin American line dance popular at Carnival
  • A circle dance adaptation of traditional Native American style
  • A square dance in traditional formation
  • A simple variation of the traditional Virginia reel in long sets

This is a terrific resource to help your kids learn songs of historical and cultural significance. You can learn the dance steps too, and it might be a great project for a homeschool support group or scout troop.

Folk Music and Dance for Kids

April 7th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, April 7, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Utah State Board of Education: So Why Music?

(www.schools.utah.gov/curr/finearts/elementarysongs)

Age Range: 4-12 (Grades PreK-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website by the Utah Office of Education encourages learning Fine Arts to “enable students to express their feelings, communicate thoughts, explore their creativity, solve problems, communicate ideas, develop a sense of community, and appreciate themselves as participants in history, tradition, and culture.”

To that end they offer a free music catalog of downloadable song files (mp3), sheet music with lyrics, and dance instructions that accompany some of the songs.

When you get to the site you’ll see the Elementary Songbook Music Catalog with a menu of traditional children’s music and folk song titles that include: 

  • “A Tisket, A Tasket”
  • “Bingo”
  • “Buffalo Gals”
  • “Down By the Bay”
  • “Going to the Zoo”
  • “If You’re Happy”
  • “Old MacDonald”
  • “Take Me Out To the Ball Game”
  • “You Are My Sunshine”
  • “Yankee Doodle”

And many more titles that you’re sure to recognize.

Plus, you’ll find a menu of Movement/Dance Options that include free, printable instructions for folk dances you can do as you listen to the songs. You’ll discover: 

  • A simple line dance in a middle eastern style
  • A couple dance after the style of French Canadian step dancing
  • A simple circle dance in the style of “big circle mountain” dancing
  • A contemporary American country line dance for sets of 3
  • A Latin American line dance popular at Carnival
  • A circle dance adaptation of traditional Native American style
  • A square dance in traditional formation
  • A simple variation of the traditional Virginia reel in long sets

This is a terrific resource to help your kids learn songs of historical and cultural significance. You can learn the dance steps too, and it might be a great project for a homeschool support group or scout troop.

Easter Egg Math for K-12!

March 26th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, March 26, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Chickscope – EggMath

(chickscope.beckman.uiuc.edu/explore/eggmath/)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

Easter and Spring Festivals are here! Eggs are everywhere in omelettes to Easter baskets! Here are some fun ways to use eggs to learn math.

The egg’s interesting mathematical properties are explored at this site. Explore the symmetry of eggs, dividing eggs equally, spherical geometry, and embryo calculus to determine how many cells are in a chick and more. When you get to the site just click on the module that interests you on the menu, and a new page opens with lesson plans and activities.

And here are more sites with eggs-citing activities:
 
HotChalk Lesson Plans Page


This website offers an Easter-egg-themed math lesson for kindergartners in a classroom. It can easily be adjusted for use in a homeschool or as a family activity.
 
Egg Carton Math


Recycle your egg cartons into a fun math game that kids of all ages will enjoy! (NOTE: You’ll have to sign up as a member of Education.com if you are not already.)
 
Egg Math Brain Teaser


Are you an egghead? Kids (grade 3 and up) will have to use their eggs to figure out the answer to this reverse cryptogram.

Solve the Mysteries of Plant Life!

March 20th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, March 20, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Plant Escape

(extension.illinois.edu/gpe/index.cfm/)

Age Range: 8-11 (Designed for Grades 4-5, but can be tweaked for a broader age/ability range – with parental supervision)

 

The University of Illinois Extension offers this free, fun science unit that will help your students solve the mysteries of plant life!

The interdisciplinary lessons introduce kids to plant science and how foods grow while enhancing their knowledge of science, math, language arts, social studies, music and art. The activities are flexible and can be used separately or in an ordered manner. Some are designed with independent study in mind, others are group or classroom activities that can be tweaked for the homeschool environment.

When you get to the site, click “enter” to begin the adventure. Or, if you prefer, click on the “Teacher’s Guide” on the menu to get some pointers in how to use the program. Either way, you will be introduced to six “Case Studies” as follows:

  • In Search of Green Life – Find out about the interrelationships that exist between people and plants. Learn about plant structure, plant parts, plant life cycles, and growing plants indoors.
  • Soiled Again – Learn about the composition of soil, nutrients in soil, gardening indoors, and composting.
  • Is It Dust, Dirt, Dandruff or a Seed? – Explore seeds, seed structure, germination, and non-flowering plants.
  • Plantenstein is the Suspect – Discover how plants reproduce and learn about pollination and flower parts.
  • Mysterious Parts That Surprise – Learn all about the differences and similarities between bulbs, rhizomes, and tubers.
  • You’ve Learned the Mysteries of Green Life – Test your knowledge of plants and plant life and enjoy additional activities such as growing lettuce, making a salad, and growing an indoor garden.

Each “Case Study” assumes the student is a detective searching to solve plant mysteries. These “Case Studies” are lessons cleverly disguised as fun activities that teach as they engage students in the process of learning about the science of plants.

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