Posts Tagged ‘history’

Make the Dirt Fly: Panama Canal History

August 9th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, August 9, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Smithsonian Libraries: Make the Dirt Fly

(www.sil.si.edu/Exhibitions/Make-the-Dirt-Fly/index.html)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

The Panama Canal opened on August 15, 1914 creating a shortcut between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. This digital exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution Libraries explains the history and process of undertaken to build the canal.

To enter the exhibition, click the home page image then read through the next few frames, using the red arrow on the right-hand side of the screen to move through the slides. After the first few slides, there will also be a map on the pages that can be used to move to different sections of the presentation. Topics covered include: 

  • Why Build a Canal?
  • Choosing a Route
  • Making the Dirt Fly
  • Waging War on Mosquitoes
  • Life in the Canal Zone
  • Civil Engineering
  • An Engineering Icon
  • Did you know?
  • Suggested Reading

Each topic includes informational text, relevant images that can be enlarged by clicking on them, quotes from people of the time, and additional facts relevant to the subject.

This site makes a nice resource for your history studies of building of the Panama Canal.

You Are There History Audios

August 2nd, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, August 2, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Internet Archive: You Are There

(archive.org/details/You_Are_There_OTR)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Family members of all ages can enjoy listening to these archived broadcasts of the “You Are There” radio program, but older students may have a better level of comprehension and retention.

“You Are There” is a series of about seven dozen or so radio broadcasts which aired from 1947 to 1950, each about half an hour long. More than 70 episodes are archived. Each episode is a fictional news report “live from the scene” of an important event in history.

As the reporter conducts interviews with famous people (and not-so-famous people) and you hear realistic sound effects, you can imagine that you have been transported back in time – and history is unfolding right before your very ears.

  • Listen in as Julius Caesar, Socrates, Captain Kidd, Maximilian, Joan of Arc, John Wilkes Booth, and others meet their end.
  • Re-live the famous battle at Thermopylae, the Alamo, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the storming of the Bastille, the battle of Gettysburg, the battle of Hastings, the fall of Troy, the defeat of Sitting Bull, and other exciting conflicts.
  • Witness the rise and fall of great leaders, the signing of pivotal documents and treaties, and important uprisings, trials, and discoveries.

Archive.org makes all of this available for free. When you reach this site, you may wish to wait a little while for the main page to load completely; a gray audio player appears near at the top of the play list of the screen. You can click on any title to play it directly from your browser.

In addition to legally and freely listening to these broadcasts online, you can also right-click on the titles to download them to your computer for listening later, then load them onto any device that plays mp3’s.

Cozy up on the couch with the family for a delightful listening adventure or listen as you travel away from home.

Books That Shaped America’s History

August 1st, 2018

 

It’s Wednesday, August 1, 2018, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Library of Congress: Books That Shaped America

(www.loc.gov/exhibits/books-that-shaped-america/overview.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

The Library of Congress has an exhibition called “Books That Shaped America” that highlights books that have had a historical impact on the lives of Americans through the ages.

The titles featured are by American authors and as the website explains, “Some of the titles on display have been the source of great controversy, even derision, yet they nevertheless shaped Americans’ views of their world and often the world’s view of the United States.” The Library of Congress encourages visitors to read the books exhibited to explore the breadth and depth of America’s literary tradition
 
This online exhibit presents a unique opportunity to identify books of historical importance by era. When you get to the site, you’ll see a menu of each era including: 

  • 1750 to 1800 – Find book titles such as: Experiments and Observations on Electricity by Benjamin Franklin, Common Sense by Thomas Paine, The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, and even the first American cookbook.
  • 1800 to 1850 – You’ll find Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a book featuring papers written by Lewis & Clark about their great expedition, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. You’ll discover why these books were of great historical importance.
  • 1850 to 1900 – The titles here will most likely be much more familiar and include: The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Moby-Dick by Herman Melville, Walden by Henry David Thoreau, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and many more.
  • 1900 to 1950 – Book titles you’ll recognize include: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, Jack London’s The Call of the Wild, Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and more.
  • 1950 to 2000 – Discover Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, The Double Helix by James D. Watson, The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss, Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, etc.

Click on any era and a new page opens that explains what each book is about and why it is historically significant. Some of the explanations are thought provoking – and could stimulate lots of discussion.
 
You might want to copy the titles and use them as a guide the next time you head to the library for a good read.

Architecture as Art

July 28th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, July 28, 2018, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Buildings Collection

(www.greatbuildings.com/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

At this website you can experience art through architecture. See photographs, 3-D models, and architectural drawings of some of the most interesting and beautiful buildings in the worldRead about their history, the architectural style employed in their design, and read about the architects who designed them.


When you get to the site, after reading the introduction, use the menu at the top of the screen to open a subsection. You’ll find that over 1,000 buildings have been categorized for ease of search by: 

  • building name
  • building type (castle, cathedral, hotel, or house, etc.)
  • architect (read their biographies)
  • architectural style (Neolithic, gothic, Islamic, Japanese, Victorian, etc.)
  • construction type (brick, geodesic, glass, etc.)
  • place where the building exists (Rome, Paris, USA, etc.)
  • There is even a building timeline (located in tiny print below the main menu on the home page) – so you can pick a date or time period and explore the buildings of that era.

You will also find references to books for further study as well as links to other sites about architecture.

11 Colorado Virtual Field Trips

July 27th, 2018

 

It’s Friday, July 27, 2018, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

University of Northern Colorado: Virtual Field Trips

(www.unco.edu/hewit/doing-history/virtual-field-trips/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Take eleven different virtual tours through Colorado history and historical locations with this page on the larger University of Northern Colorado Doing History, Keeping the Past website.

These tours include: 

  • Colorado Indians
  • Georgetown’s Historic Houses
  • Georgetown’s Historic Stores
  • An 1860’s Farm
  • An 1890’s Farm
  • Denver’s Historic Larimer Square
  • Denver’s Historic Lower Downtown
  • Denver’s Historic 17th Street
  • Denver’s Historic Civic Center

Each tour consists of images of the locations and interesting text providing a brief description, history, and more information.

Explore Colorado State History

July 26th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, July 26, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

UNCO – Doing History, Keeping the Past

(www.unco.edu/hewit/doing-history/)

Age Range: 8-13 (Grades 3-8, with parental supervision)

 

Discover the history of Colorado with this website from the University of Northern Colorado.

When arriving at today’s link use the menu under the header to begin exploring: 

  • Indians
  • Trappers & Traders
  • Miners
  • Farmers & Ranchers
  • Cities
  • 20th Century Colorado
  • Virtual Field Trips

Each topic is further broken down into sub-sections focusing on the people, places, lifestyles, occupations and more. Each section provides textural information along with images and relevant quotes.  

A nice feature of these units is there is a downloadable PDF available of the section that you can take along with you when you are offline. From the “Home” page, select the “Teacher Resources” link under the welcome section to locate downloadable Word documents of lesson plans and activities as well as other online resources.

This site would make a good addition to your Colorado state studies.

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