Posts Tagged ‘grouping’

Valentine Math

February 10th, 2014

 

It’s Monday, February 10, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Googol Learning: Valentine Math

 

Age Range: 6-14 (grades 1-9, approximately, with parental supervision).

 

At this website, you’ll find all kinds of free valentine-themed math activities that explore concepts from symmetry to Fibonacci and beyond for students of all ages. When you get to the site indulge in the sweet math menu that invites you to:

 

  • Explore measurements and temperature by making your own chocolate candy.
  • Graph your favorite chocolate bars and experiment with fractions as you divide them among your friends.
  • Use Sweetheart candies for counting, sorting, grouping, and estimation exercises.
  • Figure out the area and perimeter of a circle and square using common cinnamon heart candies.
  • Explore a variety of candy math lessons for grades 1-9.
  • Plot latitude and longitude in a game of Valentine Candy Battleship.
  • Make a symmetrical heart and calculate its perimeter.
  • Get a free printable set of multiplication flash cards for the times tables 2-13.
  • Discover your own heart’s resting rate and find out how much blood it pumps.
  • Use a formula (or algorithm) to calculate the number of hugs you’ll receive in February.
  • Solve some Valentine’s Day math word problems.

 

Then, explore the archive of links to even more Valentine’s Day math lessons, problems, quizzes, crafts, games, and more!

Don’t miss the rest of the fantastic GoogolPower.com website. You won’t believe the free math resources this site has in store for you!  

Math with Candy!

October 31st, 2011

Hi! It’s Monday, October 31, 2011 and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

Harvest Festivals and Halloween are synonymous with candy. If you’ve got extra candy around the house, try these activities using candy to learn about math.

Recommended Websites:
See Below

Age Range: All (Most of the activities are for grades K-8, but fun for all. Some of these websites are ad-supported. Parental supervision required.)

Candy Corn Math Ideas
This website offers an article that contains all kinds of great ideas for how to use candy corn to teach math – from simple concepts for young students to more advanced math problems. In fact, the article refers to the “Internet Math Challenge From the University of Idaho” as a potentially fun math problem for geometry students. (You’ll find the solution HERE.)

Education World: 35 Chocolate Activities
Get a list of fun ideas using M&M’s, chocolate Kisses, candy bars and more to explore math, science, and language arts.

MathInvestigations.com’s Candy Math Worksheet
Use M&Ms or other candies to review estimation, grouping, addition, and graphing with this free, printable worksheet.

Dupage Children’s Museum: Halloween Candy Logic
This children’s museum offers activities with candy that improves estimation, measurement, logic, problem solving, and algebraic thinking.

Make Play Dough: Halloween Candy Math – Scroll down the page to find a list of activities you can do with an assortment of candy including setting up a candy store and making a number book. Other activities teach estimation, measurement, fractions, and more.

Valentine Math Activities

February 14th, 2011

Hi!  It’s Monday, February 14, 2011 and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

Recommended Website:
Googol Power: Valentine Math

Age Range: All (with parental guidance/supervision)

As our friends at GoogolPower.com say, this is the time of year “when symmetrical Valentine hearts flourish, Fibonacci flowers are sold by the dozen, sweetheart candies are sorted, and you can count up all the ways you love your Valentine… and math!”

When you get to the site, you’ll find all kinds of free, innovative activities and suggestions for learning and enhancing math skills through things associated with Valentine’s Day such as:

*Chocolate – Explore fractions with a chocolate bar!

*Candy – Hone your sorting, grouping, and estimation skills with a box of sweetheart candies. Get free math lessons for grades 1-4. Get instructions for a game of “Valentine Candy Battleship.”

*Hearts – Learn about symmetry while calculating the area and perimeter of a heart shape. Get instructions for a game of “Broken Heart Math.”

*Valentines – Try the “Valentine Exchange Lesson.”  (Homeschoolers could substitute “support group” for “classroom” in this activity.)

*Solve Some Tricky Valentine’s Math Problems – Figure out an algorithm to solve a math puzzle, and see if you can answer some Valentine-themed word problems. 

There are lots of ingenious ideas here and links to further resources too.

Enjoy!

 

Diane Flynn Keith
for ClickSchooling
http://www.ClickSchooling.com

Valentine Math

February 8th, 2010

Hi!  It’s Monday, February 8, 2010 and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

Recommended Website:
Googol Learning: Valentine Math

Age Range: 6-14 (Grades 1-9)

At this website you’ll find all kinds of free valentine-themed math activities that explore concepts from symmetry to Fibonnaci and beyond for students of all ages. When you get to the site indulge in the sweet math menu that invites you to:

  • Explore measurements and temperature by making your own chocolate candy.
  • Graph your favorite chocolate bars and experiment with fractions as you divide them among your friends.
  • Use Sweetheart candies for counting, sorting, grouping, and estimation exercises.
  • Figure out the area and perimeter of a circle and square using common cinnamon heart candies.
  • Explore a variety of candy math lessons for grades 1-9.
  • Plot latitude and longitude in a game of Valentine Candy Battleship.
  • Make a symmetrical heart and calculate its perimeter.
  • Get a free printable set of multiplication flash cards for the times tables 2-13.
  • Discover your own heart’s resting rate and find out how much blood it pumps.
  • Use a formula (or algorithm) to calculate the number of hugs you’ll receive in February.
  • Solve some Valentine’s Day math word problems.

Then, explore the archive of links to even more Valentine’s Day math lessons, problems, quizzes, crafts, games, and more!

Don’t miss the rest of the fantastic GoogolPower.com website. You won’t believe the free math resources this site has in store for you!

Hands-On Arithmetic & Fraction Exploration Games

August 4th, 2003

Recommended Website:
Pattern Press: Patterns in Arithmetic

This website is the home of Pattern Press, the publisher of unique math books by Suki Glenn and others. These authors encourage children to learn math naturally through exploration of concepts using pattern blocks and other manipulatives. At the website they offer some free math games that you can print out and play at home with your kids. Careful, this site can be a little confusing to use — so follow the directions below to find all of the games and activities available at the site.

When you get to the site you will see 3 links to math games at the top of the page that include:

  • Trading Game — learn about place value and re-grouping.
  • Fishy Game — learn beginning addition and subtraction using fish crackers or popcorn.
  • Pattern Block Games — learn the fraction concepts of 1/3 and 1/6 and begin to see equivalencies.

But wait! When you are through exploring the Pattern Block Game mentioned above, be sure to scroll to the top of the screen. There you will see a menu of “Sample Pages” from the Pattern Press books that include introducing fractions through cooking, and some activities and examples of using pattern block games to teach fraction concepts.

Once you’ve played these games, and have seen how really simple math becomes when you build the concepts with manipulatives first, you may be tempted to buy the books to get more ideas. They are available for sale at the site as well.

Math with Cranberries!

November 12th, 2001

Since cranberries are in season, this week we are presenting a Cranberry Curriculum! Enjoy!

Recommended Website:
Estimation with Cranberries

This website offers a lesson idea for developing estimation skills and thereby making connections among number, geometry, measurement, and data concepts through the use of cranberries as math manipulatives. When you get to the site simply read the text that explains the purpose of the lesson. It will give you an idea of how to use cranberries with your kids to hone their estimation skills. Then, you can view a very short video clip showing a teacher instructing a classroom in this lesson, and you can read the text of the video as well. There are suggestions for questions to ask to enhance the learning.

While this site provides a basic idea — it would be easy to develop other strategies for using cranberries as math manipulatives as well. The lesson talks about estimating how many cranberries are in a scoop, and then in a jar. One could easily have the kids use measuring scoops of 1/4 cup, 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup, etc., and estimate how many cranberries are in the scoop. Then, count them and record the results. Cranberries can be counted, used to show grouping to understand place value, and they can be used to demonstrate math concepts such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Kids love diversity — and using cranberries as math manipulatives is an interesting, playful, and very different way to help visualize math concepts at this time of year.

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