Posts Tagged ‘experiments’

Science with Goos, Doughs, Clays, & Compounds!

March 13th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, March 13, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

100+ Goo Recipes

(web.archive.org/web/20050414073557/www.geocities.com/Heartland/3893/Goo.html)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

One of the greatest ways to introduce kids to science is through experiments that involve mixing things together to create something new, interesting, odd, strange, weird and fun! 

There are no bells and whistles at this website, just a simple archive of over 100 recipes for concoctions like slime, play dough, silly putty, and more. (Sometimes, simplicity is so refreshing, isn’t it?) NOTE: Not all of the links work, but there are definitely enough recipes to keep your children busy.

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of recipes divided into categories that include: 

  • Dough’s – Get recipes for play doughs made from flour, coffee, cornmeal, oatmeal, peanut butter, and more!
  • Clay, Goo & other Compounds – Make chocolate clay, clean mud, and the popular non-Newtonian solid using cornstarch and water. Make clay from dryer lint and Kool-Aid, make GAK (using borax and Elmer’s glue), get recipes for sand clay, silly putty, and slime!
  • Papier-mâché – Use dryer lint, strips of paper, and pastes of all textures to create imaginative designs.
  • Paints, Dyes and Crayons – Learn to make your soapy finger paint, and pudding paint. You’ll even find instructions for coloring rice and pasta.
  • Bubbles, Chalk , Stamps, Make-up – Get recipes for all kinds of bubble solutions, make sidewalk chalk, and create your own fruit-flavored stamps.
  • Art, Activities, Gifts – Make salt sculptures, preserve flowers, make ornaments and bath salts.

Click on any one to get the instructions. Then, your kids can mix potions (just like real chemists!) and make fun substances that they can use for open-ended play or to use in arts and crafts projects.

Fractals & Patterns In Nature

March 12th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, March 12, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Dance of Chance

(argento.bu.edu/museum/)

Age Range: 8/15 (Grades 3-9, with parental supervision)

 

The Center for Polymer Studies collaborated with the Boston Museum of Science to develop this online exhibit of experiments and examples that helps students explore the exciting world of patterns in nature – especially fractals.

When you get to the site, you’ll see an introduction and a menu of exhibits that include: 

  • Music of the Heart – Did you know that your electrocardiogram can be used to produce a unique melody? Listen to the “heartsongs” here and discover how they were recorded.
  • Metal Deposition – Watch a movie of copper sulfate electrodeposition viewed through a microscope. Find out what patterns zinc sulfate has in common with a snowflake.
  • Termites – Find out what their foraging trails can tell you about patterns in math including branches and fractals.

These are brief exhibits. If you want to learn more be sure to click on the links for “Fractals in Science Image Galleries” and “Exploring Patterns in Nature Curriculum Guides.” You’ll find free hands-on activities and laboratory experiments in a free complete curriculum that “encourage students to explore how fundamentally random microscopic events can give rise to fractal macroscopic patterns in nature.” Use it online or print it out to use offline an enjoy learning about topics such as: 

  • Fractals
  • Dimensions & Logarithms
  • Randomness
  • Pascal’s Triangle
  • Measuring Average Distances
  • Models of Fractal Growth
  • Biological Branching Patterns
  • Diffusion
  • Percolation in Nature
  • And much more!

Free Virtual Homeschool Science Class & More

February 27th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, February 26, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Supercharged Science

(www.superchargedscience.com/opt/free-teleclass-opt/)

Age Range: 8-14 (Grades 2-9 approximately, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers a FREE, live Science Tele-Class on Thursday, March 8, 2018 where you can “spark together electric motors, wire up circuits and build your own robot from junk!” 

The step-by-step class is taught by former NASA rocket scientist, Aurora Lipper.
 
When you get to the site you must enter your email address to register for the class. This free class is designed to be a sample of the full “Supercharged Science” series that you can purchase at the website. But you don’t have to purchase a thing to enjoy the Science Teleclass on March 8. You’ll then receive an email with the details on the time of the call and an explanation of how the Teleclass works along with a list of materials you’ll need for the class.
 
Bonus:  If you go the home page you can learn how to get a free Homeschool Science Guide with over 30 experiments plus a subscription to The Science Newsletter, and access to Science Fair project resources.

Make Bizarre Science Experiments

February 13th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, February 13, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Bizarre Stuff You Can Make in Your Kitchen

(bizarrelabs.com/)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website is an archive of classic “old school” science experiments from the early to mid-20th century. The experiments are easily made with stuff you will find around the house – especially in the kitchen. That said, the creator of the site doesn’t guarantee all of the experiments will work or that they are all safe, so parental discretion and oversight is a must.

You will find experiments that include every branch of science including: 

  • Gasses and Liquids
  • Force, Motion, & Balance
  • Locomotion
  • Temperature
  • Sound and Light
  • Electricity
  • Atomic
  • Chemistry
  • Life
  • Earth, Weather and Astronomy
  • Communications
  • and more!

Learn everything from how to cast animal tracks, to how to make a solar oven or a foxhole radio. It’s all here. The instructions are simple and easy to follow.

As with all science activities read through the list of “ingredients” and be sure you have what you need before convincing your child to try an experiment. Nothing dampens the scientific creative spirit more than not having the necessary materials to experiment in one’s kitchen laboratory.

Take a Journey to a Black Hole!

November 28th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, November 28, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

HubbleSite: Black Holes – Gravity’s Relentless Pull

(hubblesite.org/explore_astronomy/black_holes/)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 3 and up approximately; children with parental supervision)

 

The Space Telescope Science Institute offers this terrific website that allows you to engage in a multi-media, in-depth inquiry into the astronomy and physics of black holes through animations and interactive experiments. Explore light, gravity, and the scale of our universe.

When you get to the site, watch a brief, narrated animation that provides information on how black holes are formed. Then, begin your virtual journey to a black hole through three interactive modules that include: 

  • Finding the Invisible – Locate and identify various objects in the universe such as a binary star, the Cygnus galaxy, the Andromeda spiral galaxy, the sun, the moon, the Milky Way, a quasar, a red giant, Saturn, the crab nebula and more. As each object comes into view, read more about it on the sidebar and by clicking on the “Learn More” button.
  • The Voyage – Learn about scales and distances by taking a virtual trip to a black hole. Find out about the objects you pass on your trip through space. Measure your speed and distance traveled. Get explanations of the concepts of lightspeed and lightyear. When you reach your destination, mouse over the black hole to learn about its features.
  • Up Close and Personal – Orbit a black hole and learn all about it. Try some interactive experiments and answer related questions.

You can also explore the “Black Hole Encyclopedia” and “Glossary” to learn even more.

Ask A Biologist

November 21st, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, November 21, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Ask A Biologist

(askabiologist.asu.edu/home)

Age Range: 4-18 (Grades PreK-12, with parental supervision)

 

This site, from the School of Life Sciences of Arizona State University, is a “biology learning resource tool for students, teachers, parents, and life-long learners.”

When you get to the site, start at the right side bar where you’ll see a question and a link to the answer. Then you can link to more top questions like: 

  • Does brain size relate to intelligence?
  • How does eye color get passed from parents to children?
  • Is a Macadamia nut really a seed, or a nut?

You can also ask your own question using the “Ask a Question” link at the top. (Be sure to read the guidelines before you submit a question.)

In the Teacher Toolbox, you can search a topic by category, grade level or activity type. Also check out: 

  • Activities – Experiments, puzzles and coloring pages
  • Stories – Read or listen to one of the podcast shows.
  • Images – Look at things up close and guess what they are.
  • Links – Will help you find what you need on the Internet

There is extensive information here so bookmark this site to return often to get your biology questions answered.

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