Posts Tagged ‘experiments’

Free Quality Science Lessons/Activities for K-12

August 14th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, August 14, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Science NetLinks

(sciencenetlinks.com/)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

This ad-free website, sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, provides free, quality science lessons, hands-on activities, printables, interactives, teaching aids, and links to science resources for grades K-12All of the resources can be used online or printed to use offline.


When you get to the website, you’ll see some featured activities and resources. Click on “Lessons” located on the menu at the top of the page to access an archive of learning resources that cover: 

  • Earth Science
  • Physics
  • Astronomy
  • Chemistry
  • Biology
  • Health/Medicine
  • Engineering
  • Technology

You’ll even find resources for Social Sciences, Mathematics/Statistics, and Careers.

Click on “Tools” to find interactives that help you: 

  • Explore 29 different structures in the brain with a 3D Brain App
  • Learn about solar and lunar eclipses
  • Find out about the science of the Olympic winter games

Don’t miss the “Afterschool” section that offers free science experiments you can do at home to learn about geysers, classifying organisms, honeybees, forces, sound, gravity, and more.  

Bookmark this site, you’ll want to return often!

Books That Shaped America’s History

August 1st, 2018

 

It’s Wednesday, August 1, 2018, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Library of Congress: Books That Shaped America

(www.loc.gov/exhibits/books-that-shaped-america/overview.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

The Library of Congress has an exhibition called “Books That Shaped America” that highlights books that have had a historical impact on the lives of Americans through the ages.

The titles featured are by American authors and as the website explains, “Some of the titles on display have been the source of great controversy, even derision, yet they nevertheless shaped Americans’ views of their world and often the world’s view of the United States.” The Library of Congress encourages visitors to read the books exhibited to explore the breadth and depth of America’s literary tradition
 
This online exhibit presents a unique opportunity to identify books of historical importance by era. When you get to the site, you’ll see a menu of each era including: 

  • 1750 to 1800 – Find book titles such as: Experiments and Observations on Electricity by Benjamin Franklin, Common Sense by Thomas Paine, The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, and even the first American cookbook.
  • 1800 to 1850 – You’ll find Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a book featuring papers written by Lewis & Clark about their great expedition, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. You’ll discover why these books were of great historical importance.
  • 1850 to 1900 – The titles here will most likely be much more familiar and include: The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Moby-Dick by Herman Melville, Walden by Henry David Thoreau, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and many more.
  • 1900 to 1950 – Book titles you’ll recognize include: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, Jack London’s The Call of the Wild, Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and more.
  • 1950 to 2000 – Discover Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, The Double Helix by James D. Watson, The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss, Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, etc.

Click on any era and a new page opens that explains what each book is about and why it is historically significant. Some of the explanations are thought provoking – and could stimulate lots of discussion.
 
You might want to copy the titles and use them as a guide the next time you head to the library for a good read.

Weekly ‘Bring Science Home’ Activities!

July 31st, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, July 31, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Scientific American: Bring Science Home

(www.scientificamerican.com/section.cfm?id=bring-science-home)

Age Range: 6-12 (Grades 1-8, with parental supervision, and fun for the whole family)

 

This ad-supported site from Scientific American features a fun, new, science-related activity every Thursday “which parents and their kids ages 6-12 can do together with household items in just a half hour or less.”

Get instructions and explanations for a bunch of interesting experiments that cover a variety of scientific topics with intriguing titles such as: 

  • Does It Sink or Float? Depends on the Soap!
  • Tune Up Your Rubber Band Guitar!
  • Play a Memory Game with Your Nose!
  • And lots more!

Back on the home page, find videos under the “Type” drop-down menu to watch entertaining videos that demonstrate fun scientific experiments such as: 

  • How to Make Oobleck
  • How to Make Mini-Craters with Mini-Meteors
  • How to Make A Homemade Compass

When you’re through checking out what’s available in the “Bring Science Home” section, be sure to explore the rest of the massive Scientific American site. Click on the “Citizen Science” tabs under “Education” on the horizontal menu for volunteer research opportunities for budding scientists of all ages.

See How Glow Sticks Are Made

June 26th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, June 26, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

instructables

(www.instructables.com/id/Make-Glow-Sticks-The-Science/)

Age Range: All (All grades – everyone can enjoy aspects of this, with parental supervision)

 

Glow sticks are prevalent in stores at this time of year. We thought it would be fun to take a virtual tour of a glow stick factory. While we didn’t find an actual factory tour, we did find a terrific demonstration of how glow sticks are made.

When you get to this ad-supported website, you can watch a video of a chemist creating a variety of “glow stick” reactions in red, yellow, blue, green, and white. As he performs the experiments, he identifies the chemicals being used and explains the scientific reaction each produces. There are even graphs to illustrate the narration. This is a fascinating demonstration that is entertaining and educational.

Glow stick and chemistry fans will especially like this presentation.

Science with Goos, Doughs, Clays, & Compounds!

March 13th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, March 13, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

100+ Goo Recipes

(web.archive.org/web/20050414073557/www.geocities.com/Heartland/3893/Goo.html)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

One of the greatest ways to introduce kids to science is through experiments that involve mixing things together to create something new, interesting, odd, strange, weird and fun! 

There are no bells and whistles at this website, just a simple archive of over 100 recipes for concoctions like slime, play dough, silly putty, and more. (Sometimes, simplicity is so refreshing, isn’t it?) NOTE: Not all of the links work, but there are definitely enough recipes to keep your children busy.

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of recipes divided into categories that include: 

  • Dough’s – Get recipes for play doughs made from flour, coffee, cornmeal, oatmeal, peanut butter, and more!
  • Clay, Goo & other Compounds – Make chocolate clay, clean mud, and the popular non-Newtonian solid using cornstarch and water. Make clay from dryer lint and Kool-Aid, make GAK (using borax and Elmer’s glue), get recipes for sand clay, silly putty, and slime!
  • Papier-mâché – Use dryer lint, strips of paper, and pastes of all textures to create imaginative designs.
  • Paints, Dyes and Crayons – Learn to make your soapy finger paint, and pudding paint. You’ll even find instructions for coloring rice and pasta.
  • Bubbles, Chalk , Stamps, Make-up – Get recipes for all kinds of bubble solutions, make sidewalk chalk, and create your own fruit-flavored stamps.
  • Art, Activities, Gifts – Make salt sculptures, preserve flowers, make ornaments and bath salts.

Click on any one to get the instructions. Then, your kids can mix potions (just like real chemists!) and make fun substances that they can use for open-ended play or to use in arts and crafts projects.

Fractals & Patterns In Nature

March 12th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, March 12, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Dance of Chance

(argento.bu.edu/museum/)

Age Range: 8/15 (Grades 3-9, with parental supervision)

 

The Center for Polymer Studies collaborated with the Boston Museum of Science to develop this online exhibit of experiments and examples that helps students explore the exciting world of patterns in nature – especially fractals.

When you get to the site, you’ll see an introduction and a menu of exhibits that include: 

  • Music of the Heart – Did you know that your electrocardiogram can be used to produce a unique melody? Listen to the “heartsongs” here and discover how they were recorded.
  • Metal Deposition – Watch a movie of copper sulfate electrodeposition viewed through a microscope. Find out what patterns zinc sulfate has in common with a snowflake.
  • Termites – Find out what their foraging trails can tell you about patterns in math including branches and fractals.

These are brief exhibits. If you want to learn more be sure to click on the links for “Fractals in Science Image Galleries” and “Exploring Patterns in Nature Curriculum Guides.” You’ll find free hands-on activities and laboratory experiments in a free complete curriculum that “encourage students to explore how fundamentally random microscopic events can give rise to fractal macroscopic patterns in nature.” Use it online or print it out to use offline an enjoy learning about topics such as: 

  • Fractals
  • Dimensions & Logarithms
  • Randomness
  • Pascal’s Triangle
  • Measuring Average Distances
  • Models of Fractal Growth
  • Biological Branching Patterns
  • Diffusion
  • Percolation in Nature
  • And much more!
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