Posts Tagged ‘England’

Create Your Own Maps

April 28th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, April 28, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

MyGreatMaps

(mygreatmaps.com/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Create your own maps with this website from Mr. Nussbaum.

When arriving at the site, a welcome pop-up will appear encouraging you to sign up for a free account so that your maps can be saved. When you sign up as a teacher, you will be able to add student accounts so that you can see all the maps your students have created in one place.

Once your accounts have been created, the fun can begin. In the upper right, select the “Need help?” link to learn about the features of the map creator. To create your map, make a selection from: 

  • World maps – Includes world, North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, Middle East, the Caribbean, Central America, and Atlantic Ocean.
  • State maps – Select the whole US, the 13 Colonies, eight USA Regions, the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Great Lakes, New England, Southern States, Western States, or any of the 50 states.
  • Country maps – Choose from Canada, Brazil, Japan, Indonesia, China, France, Greece, United Kingdom, Ireland, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Israel, Mexico, Russia, Egypt, India, Nigeria, New Zealand, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Somalia.
  • Flags – Includes selections from various countries and states.

Once you have created your map and added features such as your key, notes, and more, the map can be saved, printed, and even shared. Once your students have learned to navigate the program and with a little practice, this tool will have your young cartographers creating all kinds of maps for geography and history projects.

New England Lighthouses: A Virtual Guide

June 5th, 2015

 

It’s Friday, June 5, 2015, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

New England Lighthouses

 

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

This website created by Jeremy D’Entremont provides visitors with information and photographs of almost 200 lighthouses found in the New England states.
When arriving at the site, there are a few ways to start exploring. Visitors can use the upper navigation menu to select “Lighthouses by State” to choose a state, then choose to see an alphabetical list of the available lighthouses. Or scroll down the page and choose the state you wish to visit in the “Lighthouses Menus by State” list. After clicking on the state in the latter method, the page that opens reveals a Google map with the lighthouse locations. Scroll down to see an alphabetical chart of the lighthouses with thumbnail images. Click on the name or image to be taken to the lighthouse page. When arriving at the page, view the image slide show and read the information relating to the lighthouse. Many lighthouse pages include links to other pages for more information and sites for more images (some sites are commercial sites).

When you have finished touring the lighthouses, select the “more. . .” option in the upper menu, then mouse over the “Links” option to reveal another sub menu where you can select “Resources for Teachers“. On this page are links to websites that provide educational material to expand your study of lighthouses.

This site makes a great addition to any study of lighthouses.

Free Sheet Music, Theory Lessons, and More

April 25th, 2015

 

It’s Saturday, April 25, 2015, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

8notes.com

 

Age Range: All (children with parental supervision)

 

This website from Red Balloon Technology Ltd. in St. Albans, England, is a fabulous resource for free sheet music for all kinds of instruments. 90% of this website is free to use with subscriptions to additional features available for $20 a year. The free portions of this website are ad-supported, but they are minimal and do not interfere with use of the site.
When arriving at the link, visitors will see sections broken down into smaller categories with image links. Sections include: 
  • Free Sheet Music & Lessons – sorted by instruments including string, wind, brass, vocal, ensembles, and other instruments
  • Music Lessons & Resources – included are Lessons, Improvisation Pieces, Play along Jam tracks, Licks & Riffs, Chord Charts and Tuners, Charts & Resources
  • Free Sheet Music Categories – music sorted by classical, pop & rock, jazz, film & TV, world, weddings, Christmas, traditional, funeral, children’s, Christian, and new music
When choosing from an instrument category, the section is further broken down into categories such as music genre, skill levels, and/or occasion. There are also resource links for lessons, forums, tuners, and more.

Music lessons and resources include basic lessons for drum, guitar, piano, saxophone, violin, music theory and more. Search by level or lesson. Find guitar, ukulele, piano, flute, clarinet, alto saxophone, recorder, and trumpet, and interactive finger and chord charts in the Chord Charts, Fingering Charts & Scales section. There is also a Composer and Artist biographies collection to explore to expand your knowledge of music greats.

When selecting from a music category, you are presented with a chart of available music within the genre. You can easily make selections by searching for difficulty level, artist, or title from the information in the chart. Click on the song title and another list shows all the instrument versions that are available. Select the instrument and the sheet music page will open.

When the sheet music pages open, you can not only view the music but also print out the sheet music. There is also access to use an online metronome and review other information about the piece.

Music lovers will want to bookmark this website and check the “Latest” category to see all the new additions to this continually building website.

(Please note that in the free portions only one page at a time can be printed when selecting the printer icon. Also subscribers only have access to the “Play”, “Play Along – Piano Accompaniment”, “Play Along Band Accompaniment”, and “Play Along – Slow Piano Accompaniment” features.)

Christmas – 360° Virtual Tour Panoramas

December 12th, 2014

 

It’s Friday, December 12, 2014, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Panoramic Earth – Christmas

 

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

If the beauty of Christmas lights makes you smile, then you will enjoy this week’s virtual tour. Part of the larger Panoramic Earth website, this page offers visitors the opportunity to visit locations in Canada and England and their past light displays.
  • Locations available include: 
  • Butchart Gardens – Vancouver, Canada, 2012
  • Regent Street – London, England, 2011
  • Oxford Circus – London, England, 2011
  • South Molton Street – London, England, 2009
  • Hyde Park – London – England, 2009
  • Oxford Street – London, England, 2009
Select the panorama you would like to see by either clicking the image or the name. When the page loads, there is information from the photographer about the image and other information about location. Click the play button on the image. When the image loads you can navigate the smaller image using the tool icons in the image. Select the icon with the 4-arrows pointing in all directions to open the image to full screen. You may use your mouse to move around the image or the tool icons in the image. Click your escape button on your keyboard to return to page. Use your back arrow to return to the list of tours.

It is interesting to see how other places decorate for the holidays and these tours give visitors an idea how Canada and England decorate.

The Bubonic Plague & Nursery Rhymes

October 8th, 2014

 

It’s Wednesday, October 8, 2014, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Nursery Rhymes – Lyrics, Origins & History!

 

Age Range: All (All grades, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers the fascinating and surprising history of nursery rhymes. Did someone actually put their baby on a tree top? Why sing about Jack and Jill getting hurt? Did horses really attempt to reassemble Humpty Dumpty? Did someone named Peter actually eat a pumpkin and then lock his wife inside the shell?

On this informative, ad-supported website, read about all your old favorites, and perhaps discover a few new ones. As a bonus, you’ll learn surprising things about the history of England and its neighboring countries too. For example, did you know that the Bubonic Plague and its symptoms were parodied in “Ring around the Rosy”? Or that “Boston” was named after someone called Saint Botolph?

Many of the featured rhymes have more than one history, which just makes them all the more fun. You get to pick which one you’d like to believe! (Some of them are so old, it’s difficult to be certain of their true origin.)

Step Back in Time with a Visit to Old Sturbridge Village

September 12th, 2014

 

It’s Friday, September 12, 2014, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Old Sturbridge Village

 

Age Range: All (All grades, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers a free virtual tour of Old Sturbridge Village to experience early New England life from 1790-1840. This is the companion website to one of the country’s largest living history museums where a staff of historians in costume reenact village life.

As explained at the website, the museum has “59 historic buildings on 200 acres, three authentic water-powered mills and two covered bridges. Visitors can ride in a stagecoach, view antiques, heirloom gardens, meet the farm animals, and take part in hands-on crafts year-round.”

The website offers the opportunity to explore this living history museum without leaving home. When you get to the website, click on the map to take a photographic tour of the museum that is accompanied by text explanations of the exhibits that include:

  • Friends Meetinghouse: Members of the Society of Friends were also called Quakers and had a distinctive way of life.
  • Tin Shop: In the 1830s, tinware shops competed successfully with pottery stores.
  • Salem Towne House: This Federal-style dwelling was the home of a prosperous farmer.
  • Printing Office: Rural printing offices produced books, broadsides, bills, and pamphlets.
  • Cider Mill: Cider mills used horsepower to press apples into cider, the region’s favorite domestic beverage.

When you’re through taking the tour, use the menu on the left to learn more – and get some old-time recipes for Potted Cheese, Gourd Soup, and Marlborough Pudding.

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