Posts Tagged ‘Dance’

Discover Countries Around the World

November 25th, 2016

 

It’s Friday, November 25, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip

at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

ProjectExplorer.org

(projectexplorer.org/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Bring the world to your classroom with the educational videos and material at this website from the non-profit organization, ProjectExplorer.

When arriving at today’s link, select your grade level then choose your desired location from across the world. A sampling of the video tours include: 

  • The song and dance of South Africa
  • A sugar shack in Canada to see how maple syrup is made
  • Climbing the Sydney Harbor Bridge in Australia
  • Teotihu├ícan pyramid in Mexico
  • Caves of Belize
  • See the Orang Utans in the Singapore Zoo
  • The food of Mumbai, India
  • Palo Verde National Park in Costa Rica
  • The Caspian Sea
  • The BBC in England
  • And so much more.

Each video tour is accompanied by a diary-like entry providing more details and information.

To access the teacher lesson plans, you will need to register for free. Once you have confirmed your registration, select the “For Teachers” link in the upper menu. Then you can search for lesson plans by country or by subject. Lesson plans include objects, standards and benchmarks, rubrics, worksheets and more.

Bookmark this website to come back to time and again to supplement your geography and social studies.

Learn to Square Dance

October 22nd, 2016

 

It’s Saturday, October 22, 2016, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Video Square Dance Lessons

(videosquaredancelessons.com/lessons/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Square dancing has been around for hundreds of years and now you can gather your family and friends together and learn how to square dance with help from the video lessons on this website. Using Mainstream and Plus dance calls, lessons are explained by caller Larry Kraber from the Saddlebrooke Squares dance club in Tucson, Arizona.

There are more than 25 lessons where you will not only learn the positions such as “heads” and “sides” but also calls such as: 

  • Circle left/right
  • Do Sa Do
  • Promenade
  • Allemande
  • California Twirl
  • Different types of “thru”s
  • Sashay
  • Box the Gnat
  • See Saw
  • Bend the Line
  • Various Wheels
  • Swings
  • Waves
  • Acey Deucey
  • Thars
  • Tag the Line
  • Load the Boat
  • And many more fun-named calls.

Each video lesson explains the call while the dancers demonstrate the moves first slowly then as it would be done in a dance.

This website provides those unfamiliar with this dance style a great way to have fun while discovering something new.

Online Elementary Songbook

July 9th, 2016

 

It’s Saturday, July 9, 2016, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Utah State Office of Education: Elementary Songbook

(www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/fineart/Elementary/Songbook/Music.aspx)

Age Range:  5-11 (Grades K-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website, sponsored by the Utah State Office of Education, offers a free online songbook with lesson plans for teaching elementary music education.

When you get to the site you’ll see menu of songs that include children’s favorites such as: 

  • A Tisket, A Tasket
  • Bingo
  • Clementine
  • Down in the Valley
  • Going to the Zoo
  • Hot Cross Buns
  • Itsy Bitsy Spider
  • Kum Ba Yah
  • Take Me Out to the Ball Game
  • This Little Light of Mine
  • and many, many more!

Click on any song and a new page opens where you will find the sheet music, lyrics, suggested activities, ideas for playing instruments, curriculum tie-ins, and more. There’s a complete lesson plan for each song listed. There are also audio files to listen to that accompany the song. Scroll further down the page to find “Movement/Dance Options” which provide dance suggestions for various songs.

While this online songbook was created with classroom teachers in mind, it can be easily tweaked for use in the homeschool or unschool environment as well.

Bad Fads Museum

June 2nd, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, June 2, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:


Bad Fads Museum

(www.badfads.com/)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

As the traditional school year comes to a close, classroom activities generally involve lighter fare. We thought we might try that approach with today’s ClickSchooling feature.

At today’s website you can explore history and social studies through taking a fun and nostalgic look at major fads – things that were popular during any given time in the modern era.

When you get to the website you will see a brief introduction and then a menu that includes Bad Fads in: 

  • Fashion – From Afro hairdos to Zoot Suits – The trends in hair, clothing and fashion accessories are listed here. Click on any one to see a photograph and read a fascinating historical (and sometimes political) explanation.
  • Collectibles – Find your favorites from Barbie Dolls and Beanie Babies to Pogs and Yo-Yos. Click on any one and find out who invented it and why it “caught on.”
  • Activities – Learn about the popularity of such pastimes as EST Therapy, Dungeons & Dragons, miniature golf, skateboarding, talking to plants, and sleeping on waterbeds. You can even find out the origins of the phrase “Kilroy Was Here!”
  • Events – Get the scoop on incredible, zany, and flat-out ridiculous crowd-pleasers such as dance marathons, flagpole sitting, goldfish swallowing, streaking, toga parties and more.

Everything we saw at this site was presented tastefully (even if the fad itself was the height of bad taste) and with general audiences in mind. Parents, as always, should preview the material to determine suitability. We think you will find that there is something wonderfully whimsical and educational in most of these bad fads that your family will enjoy.

It’s just this kind of quirky subject matter that can inspire curiosity and springboard a student to an exploration of multiple academic subjects. So, have fun and don’t be surprised at how much you learn.

Dancing for Kids and Teens

October 31st, 2015

 

It’s Saturday, October 31, 2015, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Dance Kids

(www.dance-kids.org/)

Age Range: 4-16 (Grades K-11, with parental supervision)

 

This website shares information and fun activities about dance for kids 4-9. (However, there is a sister site for teens – and you can scroll to the bottom of this review for info.)

When you get to the site you will meet your hosts, two animated children named – what else? – Fred and Ginger. Click on the door to enter the site. A new page opens with an animated screen. Simply roll your cursor over the pictures to see what’s available or – EVEN BETTER – just click on any picture and a new screen opens. That screen contains a menu at the top of the page from which you can navigate the site and it offers an assortment of activities themed around dance including:  

  • Games: Interactive, dance-themed games like word searches and puzzles
  • Dancing Globe: Learn about dance customs in different countries.
  • Dance Stories: Read stories about a child’s experience in dance school.
  • Dance Gallery: Through photos and brief text examine some of the many forms and styles of dance.

There are quite a few other dance-themed activities as well – and there is even a referral service for parents looking for dance classes for their children.

You say you have a teenager who loves dance? Then do check out the sister-site called Young-Dancers.org. It contains information on: 

  • Careers in dance
  • How to do certain trendy dances like hip-hop
  • Interesting quotes by famous dancers
  • A quiz to test your knowledge about dance
  • And much more.

These websites from the ISTD Dance Examinations Board might inspire your students to pursue their passion in dance.

Explore the Science of Music

September 1st, 2015

 

It’s Saturday, July 18, 2015, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Exploratorium: The Science of Music

(http://www.exploratorium.edu/music/index.html)

 

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Part of the larger Exploratorium website, the museum of science, art, and human perception located in San Francisco, California, this website explores the science of music through online exhibits, movies, and questions.
When arriving at the website, use the text links in the introductory paragraph to select where you would like to begin. Learn about the science involved in music with the interactive, online exhibits which include: 
  • Dot mixer – Using sound samples from different types of music discover the science of “mixing”.
  • Kitchen sink-o-pation – Discover how context has an impact on how we interpret the sounds we hear.
  • Step re-mix – Explore the musical dance form of stepping which uses the body as a percussion instrument.
  • Online drum circle – Join a live, world-wide drum circle (please note that this may not be working during your visit).
  • Headlands experiments – View videos of Exploratorium staff members experimenting with musical sound in the hills north of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge.
  • Take the beat back – Examine the origins and evolution of some interesting instruments.
Movies include an instrument builder who uses unusual materials to create his instruments, a demonstration and explanation of stepping, the specifics of orchestra tuning, and following a saxophonist to different locations to discover how acoustics affect music.

Learn the answers to the following questions:

  • How do opera singers carry notes for so long?
  • Why do some songs get stuck in your head?
  • Why can you hear the bass from a distance, but not the treble?
  • Why does some music give you goose bumps?
  • Why does your recorded voice sound strange?
  • Why does sad music sound sad?
  • Why does singing in the shower sound so good?
Music is all around us and this website encourages visitors to appreciate the science behind it.
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