Posts Tagged ‘culture’

History and Social Studies and More, Oh My!

September 29th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, September 29, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Kids.gov

(kids.usa.gov/index.shtml)

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

This sister website to the USA.gov website, designed especially for elementary and middle school students, serves as an internet gateway to educational information and services available through government agencies, schools, and educational organizations.

Using the navigation buttons at the top of the page, first decide your audience, Kids Grade K-5 or Teens Grade 6-8, then choose to:

  • Learn Stuff
  • Play Games
  • Watch Videos

This is where the fun begins. Choose from the suggestions in the scroll-able upper menu box or find the subject you are interested in by selecting it from the icons below the box. The icons will take you to another page broken down into topics. From here either browse through the list of linked websites or click the topical text link to be taken to the page of links.

All kinds of subjects are available, but we will focus on History. On the “Learn More” tab find great resources to learn about: 

  • American History
  • Constitution, Declaration of Independence and More
  • Groups and Cultures
  • Presidents
  • Time Periods and Eras
  • Wars

History games include: 

  • America by Air – Among other activities, take a virtual flight across America.
  • Colonial Williamsburg Kid’s Zone – Games that teach about life in colonial America
  • History and Culture – Smithsonian Education – a selection of games sponsored by the Smithsonian
  • And many more!

Watch videos about: 

  • Native American Indians
  • Martha Washington
  • Webcasts from the Library of Congress

(Note: While reviewing this site we found some links no longer took you directly to the right page, but adventurous researchers can dig a little on the site to locate what they need.)

Select the Teachers button in the top menu to find activities, worksheets, lesson plans and more. The Parents page provides parental resources for a subject.

This is definitely a bookmark-worthy site to come back time and again for all your subjects.

Say Hello to the World in Many Languages

September 3rd, 2016

 

It’s Saturday, September 3, 2016, and time for Foreign Languages at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Say Hello to the World

(www.ipl.org/div/hello/)

Age Range: 7-18 (Grades 2-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website cleverly offers the visitor an opportunity to learn how to say “Hello” in many of the over 7,000 languages of the world – everything from Aleut to Zulu.

This is a great place for foreign language beginners to sample various languages to determine which ones they might like to learn how to speak. The format is simple. You click on the language you want to try and a new page opens where you’ll see: 

  • The word “Hello” in that language
  • A pronunciation key
  • Words in English from that language
  • The alphabet of the language
  • Links to free lessons on learning the language – including audio and video files
  • Information about the culture

Some of the languages include: 

  • Arabic
  • Cherokee
  • Chinese
  • Finnish
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Hindi
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Mayan
  • Spanish
  • Swahili
  • Tagalog
  • Zapotec

Non-verbal Languages include Braille and Sign Language.

Bookmark this site now to return often. (However, please note that the site is no longer updated and some of the links are broken.)

French Games, Lessons, and Activities

July 23rd, 2016

 

It’s Saturday, July 23, 2016, and time for Foreign Languages at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Saber Frances

(www.saberfrances.com.ar/)

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 4-12 with parental supervision)

 

This website offers a variety of free lessons, exercises, games and activities to help students learn and practice the French language. It is designed for a wide variety of ages and ability levels.

FYI: We didn’t find “About” information for this site, so we don’t know who sponsors it. It does have scrolling Amazon.com advertisements, so there are links to outside sources. Parents, as always, should supervise exploration and use of any sites recommended here.

The site is written in both English and French (displayed side-by-side), which may help to increase competency as you navigate the site.

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of activities that include: 

  • Vocabulary – Learn a wide variety of words needed for conversational French.
  • Expressions – Learn some idioms and expressions that are used in conversation.
  • Exercises – Practice vocabulary and grammar with interactive worksheets.
  • Lecture – Improve your reading comprehension by reading essays in French about French culture.
  • Grammar – Learn and practice parts of speech including nouns, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, adjectives, etc.
  • Chansons or Songs – Learn French through songs! Watch YouTube videos of songs being sung in French. Sing along with Celine Dion, Charles Aznavour and other celebrities. You’ll also find clips of Disney films like AladdinPocahontas, and The Lion King, with the characters singing the songs in French.
  • Jeux or Games – Play Hangman and Wordsearch games to practice and improve your knowledge of French. Fun!

Note: We had some intermittent difficulty with the sound at this website when trying to hear pronunciations of various words or phrases.

The site has something to offer students with varying ranges of ability. If you have young children, head to the “Songs” section first. If your children know some French words they may enjoy playing hangman and wordsearch. More adept students may want to try the reading comprehension and grammar exercises.

Again, parents, as always, should preview the site and supervise use.

Tour Tocqueville’s 1831 America

July 15th, 2016

 

It’s Friday, July 15, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Democracy in America

(xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/DETOC/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

Today’s website provides the full text (that you can read online or print out to read offline) of Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville – one of the most influential works on the politics and culture of America in 1831-1832.

As the website introduction explains:

What he saw there, who he talked with, what he read and overheard, became the stuff of his analysis of our nation’s essential nature and probable destiny. And almost everything he saw and heard has, of course, simply vanished…. Cincinnati is no longer a frontier boom town and the trackless wilderness of Tennessee has been comfortably suburbanized and malled along with the rest of the country….

And so we’re attempting to construct a virtual American ca. 1831-32…. based on Tocqueville’s itinerary, on his and his friend Beaumont’s letters and journals, on contemporaneous accounts of other foreign visitors, and on a variety of examples of material culture of the period, mostly paintings and engravings. It also holds explorations of Women’s Place at the time, of attitudes toward race and color, towards religion, and towards everyday life.

Democracy in America gives keen insight to life in the United States in the early/mid-19th century.

In addition to the text, the site offers an interesting VIRTUAL TOUR of Tocqueville’s America in 1831, through featured textual excerpts, illustrations, pictures, and more. It’s a great way to preview the book and get a peek at American culture over 150 years ago. The virtual tour alone provides an interesting social studies lesson.

When you get to the site you will see a map in the center of the screen. Above it is a link to the full text of the book and an introduction to the website.

A menu surrounds the map. The Virtual Tour is the first link on the menu on the left-hand side of your screen. It is followed by links to various other highlights based on the book including: 

  • Red, Black & White: Race in 1831
  • Everyday Life in 1831
  • American Religion in 1831
  • American Women: 1820-1842
  • and much more.

This is a fascinating historical account of life in America that sheds light on our past while illuminating the stark contrasts to present day America. After exploring the site, you can’t help but speculate what the future will bring.

Explore Civil War Collections at the Smithsonian

July 8th, 2016

 

It’s Friday, July 8, 2016, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

CivilWar@Smithsonian

(www.civilwar.si.edu/home.html)

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

Explore the artifacts and memorabilia from the Civil War era with this website from the Smithsonian Institution and produced by the National Portrait Gallery.

Select from the following menu items: 

  • Collections – Through images and text, examine the items and portraits in the following collections: 
    • Slavery and Abolition
    • Abraham Lincoln
    • First Blood
    • Soldiering
    • Weapons
    • Leaders
    • Cavalries
    • Navies
    • Life and Culture
    • Appomattox
    • Winslow Homer
    • Matthew Brady
  • Timeline – Learn about the events of the Civil War from 1859-1865 through this textural timeline.
  • Resources – Expand on your studies of the collections with additional links and book recommendations.

This tour will make a wonderful supplement to your American history studies.

Learn the History of the Raid on Deerfield

April 7th, 2016

 

It’s Thursday, April 7, 2016, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Raid On Deerfield: The Many Stories of 1704

(1704.deerfield.history.museum/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

Count us among the ignorant who had never learned about the Raid on Deerfield of 1704. That’s astonishing when you consider how this singular event impacted American history.

At today’s website, you will find a well thought-out and exceptional use of multi-media technology that presents the history leading up to the Raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts in 1704, the raid itself, and the legacies in its aftermath. But beyond the historic scenarios, are the stories of the people who were there. Through primary source documents and in-depth research this site captures and brings to life the involvement of culturally distinct groups of people and conveys the meaning it had for each one. The lives of Native Americans (W├┤banaki, Kanienkehaka, and Wendat), African slaves, and English and French colonists intersected at this moment in history to play significant roles in the Raid on Deerfield.

When you get to the site, you will see a menu. To get the most out of this site the FIRST thing you should do is click on “Play the Introduction to 1704.” Wait a minute for the video/audio to load and then sit back and enjoy the introductory presentation as it lays the foundation for everything else you will find at this site.

Once you watch the introduction, then you can either follow the menu outline to examine each section of the site in orderly sequence, or you can pick and choose the various aspects of the site you’d like to explore including: 

  • Meet the 5 Cultures – Meet the 5 cultural groups involved in the raid, and engage in an in-depth exploration of their history, lifestyles, habits, and how they interacted.
  • Go To The Story Menu – This timeline depicts the events and conflict preceding the raid, the raid itself, and the aftermath. Each segment is described from the perspective of each culture that was present.
  • Enter The Conflict – View maps of Deerfield and the surrounding area, get explanations for what occurred, meet the people involved in the raid, and examine artifacts.

Each of the above selections contain many links to resources for further exploration. You can skim for general information or delve into the content depending on your level of interest.

Don’t forget to check out the mini-menu bar on each page of the site. In addition to the above items, it contains a shortcut to hearing a radio broadcast commemorating the Raid, as well as audio snippets of legends and stories told by each of the different cultures involved in the Raid on Deerfield. You can also hear English songs and French music circa 1650-1750.

This is an exceptionally designed website that provides a multicultural glimpse of early American history through five different perspectives and interpretations of the facts. As mentioned in the audio/video introduction, there isn’t one truth provided here – rather they consider all of truths from different perspectives. The purpose is to bring history alive in all its uncertainties so we can begin to ask helpful questions that enable us to understand the past. Highly recommended.

Note: While this site is probably designed with middle school students and up in mind, younger students may enjoy aspects of the site on a visit with mom or dad.

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