Posts Tagged ‘culture’

User-Created Timeline

April 12th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, April 12, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Timeline Index

(www.timelineindex.com/content/home.php)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision – also see note at bottom of review)

 

One of our ClickScholars wrote this: “I have been looking and looking for a good online timeline site and I think I stumbled across it. You can browse by who/what/when/where/which, and you can search. I think I’m in heaven. It’s got nice visuals, links to pages with more information, and so on. It looks to be a wiki (user-created) but it’s nicely filled out at this point.”

The Timeline Index is a portal that provides a user-created chronological context of the following categories: 

  • PEOPLE, PERSONALITIES, & HEROES – You’ll find historical entries for Actors, Alchemists, Archaeologists, Artists, Astronauts, Composers, Conquerors, Dictators, Explorers, Inventors, Mathematicians, Musicians, Philosophers, Scientists, Settlers, US Presidents, Writers, Women, and much more!
  • SUBJECTS, EVENTS, & ISSUES – Explore the timelines for: Art, Culture, Education, Exploration, Health, Industry, Law, Nature, Politics, Religion, Sports, Disasters, Discoveries, Empires, Revolutions, Theories, War, and more.
  • PERIODS, AGES, & EPISODES – Examine these eras in chronological context: Bronze Age, Ice Age, Industrial Age, Iron Age, Middle Ages, Reformation, Renaissance, Stone Age, and more.
  • REGIONS, CONTINENTS, & COUNTRIES – Travel back in time to Africa, America, the Arctic, Asia, Europe, Middle East, Oceania, and the Universe.
  • OBJECTS, THINGS, & CREATIONS – See the context of a variety of topics through time such as Books, Film, Music, Paintings, Economics, Fiction, Myths, Non-Fiction, Poetry, Travel, and more.

Click on any timeline entry in any given topic area and a new page opens with further information that is user-created and includes some illustrations and URLs to other websites where you can get more information.

You can also create your own timeline item and add it to the Timeline Index, or you can add a related link (URL) to an existing item. Details are available at the site and entries require registration.

NOTE TO PARENTS: While this is an exciting idea, it comes with an element of risk because it is user-created. There are a vast array of topics, so it was impossible to review all of the entries. While the website reserves the right to edit/remove items that are contributed to maintain quality, it’s unknown if editing occurs prior to posting. It’s also unclear if suggested links for further research are reviewed for suitable content. AS ALWAYS, parents should preview the site to determine suitability of content for their own children.

Folk Music and Dance for Kids

April 7th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, April 7, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Utah State Board of Education: So Why Music?

(www.schools.utah.gov/curr/finearts/elementarysongs)

Age Range: 4-12 (Grades PreK-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website by the Utah Office of Education encourages learning Fine Arts to “enable students to express their feelings, communicate thoughts, explore their creativity, solve problems, communicate ideas, develop a sense of community, and appreciate themselves as participants in history, tradition, and culture.”

To that end they offer a free music catalog of downloadable song files (mp3), sheet music with lyrics, and dance instructions that accompany some of the songs.

When you get to the site you’ll see the Elementary Songbook Music Catalog with a menu of traditional children’s music and folk song titles that include: 

  • “A Tisket, A Tasket”
  • “Bingo”
  • “Buffalo Gals”
  • “Down By the Bay”
  • “Going to the Zoo”
  • “If You’re Happy”
  • “Old MacDonald”
  • “Take Me Out To the Ball Game”
  • “You Are My Sunshine”
  • “Yankee Doodle”

And many more titles that you’re sure to recognize.

Plus, you’ll find a menu of Movement/Dance Options that include free, printable instructions for folk dances you can do as you listen to the songs. You’ll discover: 

  • A simple line dance in a middle eastern style
  • A couple dance after the style of French Canadian step dancing
  • A simple circle dance in the style of “big circle mountain” dancing
  • A contemporary American country line dance for sets of 3
  • A Latin American line dance popular at Carnival
  • A circle dance adaptation of traditional Native American style
  • A square dance in traditional formation
  • A simple variation of the traditional Virginia reel in long sets

This is a terrific resource to help your kids learn songs of historical and cultural significance. You can learn the dance steps too, and it might be a great project for a homeschool support group or scout troop.

Folk Music and Dance for Kids

April 7th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, April 7, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Utah State Board of Education: So Why Music?

(www.schools.utah.gov/curr/finearts/elementarysongs)

Age Range: 4-12 (Grades PreK-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website by the Utah Office of Education encourages learning Fine Arts to “enable students to express their feelings, communicate thoughts, explore their creativity, solve problems, communicate ideas, develop a sense of community, and appreciate themselves as participants in history, tradition, and culture.”

To that end they offer a free music catalog of downloadable song files (mp3), sheet music with lyrics, and dance instructions that accompany some of the songs.

When you get to the site you’ll see the Elementary Songbook Music Catalog with a menu of traditional children’s music and folk song titles that include: 

  • “A Tisket, A Tasket”
  • “Bingo”
  • “Buffalo Gals”
  • “Down By the Bay”
  • “Going to the Zoo”
  • “If You’re Happy”
  • “Old MacDonald”
  • “Take Me Out To the Ball Game”
  • “You Are My Sunshine”
  • “Yankee Doodle”

And many more titles that you’re sure to recognize.

Plus, you’ll find a menu of Movement/Dance Options that include free, printable instructions for folk dances you can do as you listen to the songs. You’ll discover: 

  • A simple line dance in a middle eastern style
  • A couple dance after the style of French Canadian step dancing
  • A simple circle dance in the style of “big circle mountain” dancing
  • A contemporary American country line dance for sets of 3
  • A Latin American line dance popular at Carnival
  • A circle dance adaptation of traditional Native American style
  • A square dance in traditional formation
  • A simple variation of the traditional Virginia reel in long sets

This is a terrific resource to help your kids learn songs of historical and cultural significance. You can learn the dance steps too, and it might be a great project for a homeschool support group or scout troop.

Solve the History Mystery

March 15th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, March 15, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Scholastic: History Mystery

(teacher.scholastic.com/histmyst/index.asp)

Age Range: 9-13 (Grades 4-8, with parental supervision)

 

One of our ClickScholars recommended today’s website that offers a series of fun “History Mysteries” for students to solve.

When you get to the site you will see your animated guide, Dr. Carlotta Facts, a professor at the fictional History Mystery Museum. Dr. Facts challenges students to figure out the historic person, place, event, or object she is studying based on 4-5 clues she provides. The idea is to solve the mystery in as few clues as possible.

Students are encouraged to use the clues to conduct research on the World Wide Web (or use offline resources like textbooks, maps, and reference books) to solve the mystery. There is an online search mechanism built into the game. Each “History Mystery” game is themed in United States or world history and includes topics in these categories: 

  • African-American History
  • Environmental History
  • Government and Politics
  • Inventions and Technology
  • Social & Cultural History
  • Women’s History
  • Exploration
  • World Civilizations

Within each topic category, there is a list of sub-topics. Click on any one to play a game themed on that topic. Once students think they have solved the mystery, they submit an answer. If the answer is correct, they receive a designation as an investigator of historical mysteries and an opportunity to learn more about the subject. If the answer is incorrect, they can receive another clue, investigate further, or submit another solution. They can also click on “see the answer” and read all about the topic.

The History Mystery game is a fun way to challenge your knowledge of history and a great way to introduce information on various historical periods, civilizations, industry and technology, certain landforms and geography, and elements of culture.

The Presidential Campaign of 1896

February 1st, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, February 1, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Presidential Campaign – Cartoons & Commentary

(projects.vassar.edu/1896/1896home.html)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website from Vassar College presents information relating to the 1896 presidential election of William McKinley over William Jennings Bryan. Historians consider this election to be one of the “most dramatic and complex in American history.”

When arriving at today’s link, review the introduction and information about symbols used throughout the pages. Under this information visitors will find links to the pages of the site broken down into sections: 

  • Leaders – Learn about the important people of the time such as Susan B. Anthony, J.P. Morgan, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Booker T. Washington, Andrew Carnegie as well as the candidates and more.
  • Themes of the Campaign – Discover the “hot topics” that fueled the campaigns including the Civil War, racial prejudice, economic depression, woman suffrage, and much more.
  • Popular Culture of 1890’s – Explore inventions, medicine, amusements and more of the time.
  • Special Features – Under this section find “Classroom Ideas” for using the 1896 website including discussion questions, writing prompts, further reading suggestions, and advanced researching ideas.

Throughout the website are images of political cartoons which can also be accessed from the link in the upper menu at the top of the home page. Please take note of this important statement on the website homepage: 

“1896” contains many images and arguments that the site’s architects find offensive, including antisemitic and racial slurs. These themes–and protests against them, which were largely ignored in the press–represented the state of public opinion at the time. We include such material as part of our commitment to a full understanding of the past and its legacies today.


As always, please preview this website prior to allowing your students’ use.

Learn French with free videos!

January 6th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, January 6, 2017, and time for Foreign Languages at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

French in Action

(www.learner.org/resources/series83.html)

Age Range: 14-Adult (Grades 9-Adult; children with parental supervision)

 

This portion of the larger Annenberg Learner website provides 52 half-hour video lessons that use the immersion method of teaching to increase French fluency and introduce French culture.

The videos present a humorous continuing story of an American student and a Frenchwoman’s adventures in France. Additional native speakers of all ages and backgrounds not only add to the storyline but enhance the learning process.

Each lesson begins with an episode of the continuing story. The next portion of the lesson clarifies and illustrates the dialog of the story with focus on a specific term. Each lesson also provides opportunities to “participate” in the video by repeating lines. A sampling of lesson topics include: 

  • Planning and Anticipating – greetings, health, surprise, decisiveness, subject pronouns, articles
  • Names and Origins – numbers, commands, necessity
  • Physical Characteristics – appearance, sports, questions, describing yourself
  • Kinship – family relationships and more
  • Describing Others – also games, agreement, time, weather
  • Encounters – conversations, seasons, reflexive verbs, adjectives
  • Occupations – work, buying and spending, days and months of the year
  • Education – talking about occupations, manners
  • Getting Around – telephone, courtesy
  • Food and Drink – food, drink, ordering from a restaurant
  • Transportation and Travel – modes of transportation, expressing fear, admiration
  • Habitat – asking for directions, talking about homes
  • Entertainment – talking about entertainment, expressing restriction, reservation, doubt, enthusiasm
  • Getting and Spending – money, buying and selling
  • Geography and Tourism – countries and regions, exaggeration, confirmation, insistence
  • Getting Away – destination, levels of speech, negative infinitive, imperatives, pronouns

Add this website to your French foreign language studies to increase your students’ proficiency in the language.

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