Posts Tagged ‘climate’

Help Contribute to Real Academic Research

June 5th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, June 5, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Zooniverse

(www.zooniverse.org/projects)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 4 and up approximately; children with parental supervision)

 

This website “is home to the internet’s largest, most popular and most successful citizen science projects” developed by the Citizen Science Alliance.

The CSA works with scientists and researchers around the world on projects that use the efforts and ability of citizen volunteers. Parents and kids can have a great time together engaging in real science projects!

When you get to the site, you’ll see an image menu of the current projects. Click on any image and a new screen opens with a brief description. Click on “Learn More” to get a detailed explanation of the project and what volunteers do. Once you understand the scope of the project, you can sign up to participate (free). Some of the current projects include: 

  • CLIMATE – Help scientists recover worldwide weather observations using Royal Navy ship logs.
  • MEDICINE – Play a brain match game.
  • NATURE – Help marine researchers understand how whales communicate.
  • SPACE – Help track solar storms, measure and map our galaxy, identify meteors, and more!

Some of the projects include “Resources for Teachers” with interactive lesson plans, teachers’ notes, presentations, events and exhibitions. They are designed for classroom students but can be tweaked for use at home.

Don’t miss the opportunity to explore the “Paused” or “Retired” projects too!

This is a terrific way to engage the whole family in science explorations. Bookmark it to return often.

Free “Citizen Science” Projects for You

April 10th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, April 10, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

SciStarter

(www.scistarter.com/)

Age Range: 6 and up (Grade 1 and up; children with parental supervision)

 

This website provides an archive of  “Citizen Scientist” projects that you and your kids can do at home to help researchers gather information on bees, birds, crickets, storms, solar energy, microbiomes, and much, much more.

You’ll learn all about science as you take part in both informal recreational activities and formal research efforts that make science simple and fun for the whole family.

At the top of the site, you’ll see that April 14, 2018 is Citizen Science Day! See if there are any events near you.

Or scroll down to see the featured projects. You can also “Find a Project” by location and topic. Select a subject of interest such as: animals, astronomy  space, birds, chemistry, climate & weather, food, health & medicine, insects & pollinators, nature & outdoors, physics, etc. Click on any item on the drop-down menu and a new page opens with a list of projects currently available in that category. You can do an advanced search from the next screen that allows you to filter for: 

  • Projects you can do online, outdoors, indoors
  • Projects suitable for different age groups

And you can even filter for projects that have classroom materials available.
 
From the home page you can also sign up to receive their free “newsletter” that delivers information about awesome projects to your email inbox.

Math Goodies & WebQuests

April 2nd, 2018

 

It’s Monday, April 2, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Math Goodies

(www.mathgoodies.com/)

Age Range: 9-14 (Grades 5-8 approximately, with parental supervision)

 

This ad-supported website features a smattering of free interactive math lessons, printable worksheets, games and more to help students in about grades 5-8 learn math. Gifted younger children and remedial older students may benefit from the resources provided as well.

The site was designed by a math teacher who also developed a complete math course that is available for sale on the site. However, you don’t have to purchase a thing to access the generous sampling of math lessons and materials.

When you get to the site you’ll see a brief introduction followed by some featured items and lots of advertisements. Scroll down to the bottom for the menu that includes: 

  • Lessons – Learn how to determine the perimeter and area of polygons. Find out how to simplify, compare, order, and convert fractions. Explore decimals and percentages. Find out how to write algebraic expressions and equations and much more!
  • Worksheets – Download math worksheets (pdf) that include an introduction to fractions, decimals, percent applications, probability theory, graphs, and symbolic logic.
  • Webquests – This terrific resource provides math inquiries and instructions that lead to online explorations to find information and solve problems. Choose from a short but meaty selection of quests to recommended websites and learn about exponents and scientific notation, integers and science, math and climate, math and sports, number theory, percentages in daily life, and even a “Pi Day” celebration.
  • Games – An assortment of interactive math games including: Factor Tree Game, Integer Football, Percent Goodies, and Probability Goodies.
  • Puzzles – Enjoy interactive math-themed crossword puzzles about circles, fractions, logic, percentages, polygons, and probability.

And lots more!

Discover the History of Ohio

March 1st, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, March 1, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Ohio History Central

(www.ohiohistorycentral.org/w/Welcome_To_Ohio_History_Central)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Every year on March 1st, Ohio celebrates Statehood Day. However, there is some controversy as to the actual date statehood was confirmed. With this site from the Ohio History Connection, see why there is confusion and learn all about the history of Ohio.

When arriving on the welcome page of the site, read through the introduction and quick facts. Then either use the search engine in the upper menu to find specific information or select the “Browse” dropdown menu to search alphabetically, by category, topic, or time-period or use the timeline to view events sequentially. Topics covered include: 

  • African Americans
  • American Indians
  • American Revolution
  • Arts and Entertainment
  • Business and Industry
  • Civil War
  • Climate and Weather
  • Communities and Counties
  • Education
  • Frontier Ohio
  • Government and Politics
  • Historic Sites
  • Military
  • Reform
  • Religion
  • Science and Medicine
  • Sports and Recreation
  • State Symbols
  • Statehood
  • Transportation
  • Women
  • World Wars

Feeling adventurous? Select the “Random Page” option and dig into a random topic. Concise text often accompanied by an image make this a great research site for your Ohio state history studies.

Amazing Science Videos

November 7th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, November 7, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Vega Science Trust

(www.vega.org.uk/video/index.html)

Age Range: 11 and up (Grades 6 and up; children with parental supervision)

 

This archived website offers free videos on science, technology, engineering and mathematics that provide a fundamental understanding of the principles of nature and the physical world.

When you get to the site you’ll see the video icon menu containing an archive of scientific videos which can all be viewed from this non-profit website. The videos cover a broad range of topics such as: 

  • Interviews with Scientists – Including Nobel prize-winners in the fields of physics, medicine, chemistry, and more.
  • Careers in Science – Interviews with a biochemist, ecologist, entomologist, food scientist, cosmologist, computer engineer, quantum chemist, robotics engineer and more!
  • Issues of Concern – Scientists and politicians discuss their primary world concerns including climate change, malaria, etc.
  • Masterclass Science Videos – Scientists share their personal views on key concepts and achievements as well as their approach to the scientific method. Topics include bird flight, life in space, and states of matter.
  • The Next Big Thing – Scientists discuss antimatter, cloning, defying death, energy, artificial intelligence, safety of mobile phones, nanotechnology, and “The Theory of Everything!”
  • Educational Resources – A selection of short instructional films (for school or home study use) on wind power, electricity, transistors, nanotubes, bucky ball workshops, states of matter workshops (solids, liquids and gases) and more.

Scientists guided the development of the videos so that the content is presented in a natural and engaging way that is intellectually challenging.

Trick Photography Explained

October 29th, 2016

 

It’s Saturday, October 29, 2016, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The American Museum of Photography – Photographic Fictions

(www.photographymuseum.com/photographicfictions.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Explore the history of trick photography with this website from The American Museum of Photography. The museum offers an exhibit called “Photographic Fictions: How The Camera Learned To Lie” that documents the history of how photographers used the camera to create pictures that tampered with reality. This online exhibit is really a companion to a book by the same title.

The exhibit is set up like a book – you simply click your way through the chapter pages to see great pictures and read text that illustrates the progress of trick photography from altered daguerreotypes to composite photographs designed to fool the eye. When you get to the site you will see a menu that includes: 

  • Introduction: Tampering With Perfection – Find out how early photographers used embellishment to improve upon reality.
  • Montages, Multiples & Mischief – Discover the secrets of double exposures and the art of creating photomontages.
  • Do You Believe? Spirit Photography, 1868-1935 – In early photography a person who moved out of camera range after only a portion of the exposure was completed would appear as a see-through blur or a “ghost.” One photographer claimed he had taken actual photographs of ghosts, starting a fad of spirit photography and a scientific controversy that lasted well into the 20th century. See the images and read the story in this section.
  • Seeing Double: Creating Clones With a Camera – In the 1860s, photographers developed techniques to duplicate people – causing them to appear twice in the same photograph. These double-exposure novelties were popular for more than three decades.
  • Faux Snow: Climate Change In the Studio – See how photographers created Winter climate conditions in their studios.
  • “Did You Ever Have a Dream Like This?” – Check out the home-grown surrealism of trick photographer “Dad” Martin.

This online exhibit provides a really fascinating peak at the development of an art form of illusion. It makes one question the belief that “the camera doesn’t lie.” 

Note: Today’s featured website houses other exhibits by the American Museum of Photography as well. We have not previewed the other exhibits, so our suggestion (as always) is for parents to review the content for suitability before sharing it with your children.

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