Posts Tagged ‘calculus’

Free Math Software for Algebra, Geometry & More!

July 13th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, July 13, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

GeoGebra (http://www.geogebra.org/)

 

Age Range: 10 and up (about middle school and beyond with parental supervision)

 

This website provides free, interactive mathematics software for students of many ages that teaches algebra, geometry, graphing, statistics, and calculus.
It’s available in many languages for users around the world and includes: 
  • Lessons
  • Video Tutorials
  • Worksheets
  • Animations
  • and much more!
When you get to the site you’ll see “Featured Materials” that will acquaint you with the materials and how to access them.

It’s helpful to poke around the site, get a feel for the content provided in the software, and then visit the “user forum” to get additional advice.

Notice that as you open each page, a horizontal menu appears on the left to show you similar material.

Resources for Learning Math

May 11th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, May 11, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Math2.org

 

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

Math2.org offers resources for learning math. It is a member of the Web Math Collaboration (WMC), a federation of math websites with the goal of providing “freely accessible open spaces for people to collaborate on and discuss mathematical subjects, help those who have difficulties in mathematics, and provide mathematical resources to the public.”
When you get to the website you’ll see it is very clearly organized and includes: 
  • Math Reference Tables (also available in Spanish!) — All of the most important tables and formulas you need to study math: basic arithmetic facts, trig identities, derivatives and integrals, and even Fourier transforms, all in one convenient place for you to use and review. The conic sections are simply but clearly illustrated, and the calculus even includes proofs!
  • The Math Message Board — Post your math questions in this forum and get answers on this very active board! (As with all forums, children will need adult supervision.) Browse through past questions and enjoy the lively give-and-take in this helpful math-loving community; try your hand at verifying the solutions to any that catch your interest.
  • Have A Math Question? — This section refers those with questions to either the Math Message Board (described above) or to the “Ask Dr. Math” website.
  • Links — A list of links to other websites that offer everything from general math resources and lesson plans for grades K-16 to an extensive collection of mathematical theorems and formulas.
  • Other Resources — You’ll find an English-Spanish math dictionary here! Bonus: If you would like to see what else this webpage author has created, click on “Dave Manura” at the bottom of the page.

Mudd Math Fun Facts

May 4th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, May 4, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Mudd Math Fun Facts

 

Age Range: 12 and up (Grades 6-adult, children with parental supervision)

 

Today’s website was originally designed as a warm-up activity for calculus courses taught at Harvard. In an effort to help college students see the interesting stuff that motivates mathematicians to study the subject, a professor began to tell his students “Fun Facts” – or daily mathematical tidbits from all areas of mathematics (not just calculus), meant to arouse their curiosity and fascination with the subject. The students loved it. That motivated the professor to archive the “Fun Facts” that he and his colleagues collected at today’s website. Even though this is designed for college level students, there are ideas and math patterns that will fascinate and challenge students of many grade levels and abilities.
When you get to the site you will see a brief introduction. Then, use the combination menu and search engine on the left to get “Fun Facts” about: 
  • Algebra
  • Geometry
  • Calculus
  • Number Theory
  • Probability
  • Topology
  • and more!
A nice feature is that you can search by difficulty level from “Easy” to “Advanced” in any of the subject categories. Once you make your selection a new page appears with a menu of “Fun Facts” from which to choose. Click on any one of these and a new page opens that explains and illustrates the concept. “Fun Facts” not only challenges those skilled in mathematics, but it provides a way to give less skilled students a glimpse of advanced mathematics. Students will become familiar with math vocabulary and “buzzwords” even if they don’t fully understand what they mean. It might just spring-board their curiosity to do some further research that will enhance their math education.

Easter Egg Math for K-12!

March 30th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, March 30, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Various

 

Age Range: All (varies by website, children with parental supervision)

 

Easter and Spring Festivals are here! Eggs are everywhere in omelets to Easter baskets! Here are some fun ways to use eggs to learn math…See below for recommended websites. 
The egg’s interesting mathematical properties are explored at this site that seems to be designed for students in junior high and up. Explore the symmetry of eggs, dividing eggs equally, spherical geometry, and embryo calculus to determine how many cells are in a chick and more. When you get to the site just click on the module that interests you on the menu, and a new page opens with lesson plans and activities.
Print out this worksheet with egg-themed math word problems for elementary grades.
This website offers an Easter-egg-themed math lesson for Kindergartners in a classroom. It can easily be adjusted for use in a homeschool or as a family activity.
Recycle your egg cartons into a fun math game that kids of all ages will enjoy!
Are you an egghead? Kids (grade 3 and up) will have to use their eggs to figure out the answer to this reverse cryptogram.

Challenging Math Puzzles, Games, & Lessons!

March 16th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, March 16, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Cut-The-Knot

 

Age Range: 10 and up (Grades 4-12, children with parental supervision)

 

This ad-supported website offers a vast array of interactive math puzzles, lessons, and activities geared to those who have mastered basic arithmetic and are studying algebra, geometry, probability, etc.
When you get to the site you will see a brief introduction in the center of the page. Scroll below it to a menu that includes links to activities in the following areas: 
  • Arithmetic
  • Algebra
  • Math Games & Puzzles
  • Logic
  • Fractals & Chaos
  • Calculus
  • Geometry
  • Probability
  • Computer Math Magic
  • Visual Illusions
  • And much more!
Click on any one of interest and a new page opens with instructions and interactives.
Students studying middle school math and beyond will have no problem navigating this site and enjoying the activities on their own.

Note: Because the site contains many randomly generated advertising banners and buttons, parents (as always) should preview the site and supervise Internet access.

Challenging Mathematical Puzzles

September 29th, 2014

 

It’s Monday, September 29, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Nick’s Mathematical Puzzles

 

Age Range: 11 and up (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

At this website you’ll find a collection of more than 100 math puzzles that cover algebra, geometry, probability, number theory, trigonometry, calculus, and logic. They have been selected “for the deceptive simplicity of their statement, or the elegance of their solution.” While they will challenge your cleverness, the site founder Nick Hobson (who has a math degree and works in computer software) says, they “usually only require pre-college math.”
When you get to the site you will see an introduction. Above it is a menu bar that currently provides access to 160 puzzles. View the “Index” to see the names of the puzzles archived here. Click on any one, and a new page opens with the puzzle. You’ll see 1-4 stars next to each puzzle title that designates the level of difficulty, with four being the most difficult.
As mentioned at the website, “Explaining how an answer is arrived at is more important than the answer itself. To this end, hints, answers, and fully worked solutions are provided, together with links to related mathematical topics. Further references are provided with many of the solutions. The puzzles are intended to be fun, with an educational element.”
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