Posts Tagged ‘calculus’

Thought-Provoking Math Activities for K-12

January 18th, 2016

 

It’s Monday, January 18, 2016, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

NRICH (nrich.maths.org/frontpage)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website, sponsored by Cambridge University, seeks to enrich math curriculum for learners of all ages by providing free, engaging, interactive math activities that provoke mathematical thinking. This isn’t about math lessons and worksheets: it’s about exploring math concepts through unusual problems to provide deeper understanding.

When you get to the website you’ll see a brief introduction and a menu that’s divided into two sections:

Student Homes – This area is divided into sections with activities for students in various grade/ability levels: 

  • Lower Primary – Activities that help children understand the concept of sorting, matching, and numbers
  • Upper Primary – Explore shapes, numbers and operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division), time, logic and more.
  • Lower Secondary – Get useful insights for determining area, perimeter, and volume. Experiment with curves, triangles, and geometric reasoning.
  • Upper Secondary – Use area integrals to solve problems, explore ideas in statistics.

Teacher Homes – This area is divided into three sections with teacher information and activities for: 

  • Early Years – Building the foundational understanding to develop math skills.
  • Primary Years – Activities that encourage students to work systematically to solve math problems.
  • Secondary Years – Exploring area, perimeter, shapes, volume, Pi, and Calculus to solve real world problems.

There’s a lot here. Be prepared to click around to find all of the activities and resources that are available.

Challenging Math In Movies

November 2nd, 2015

 

It’s Monday, September 21, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

MathBits.com: Math and the Movies

(www.mathbits.com/MathBits/MathMovies/MathMovies.htm)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

Want to make math fun? If you’re willing to do a bit of prep work at the audio-visual department of your local library or on Netflix (or whatever movie provider you use), you and your kids will be rewarded with some really fun math explorations.

This website offers free math activities and worksheets based on short scenes or clips from movies and television shows that present mathematical content (not watered-down content) in a variety of educational styles. As explained at the website, the clips fall into two main categories: 

  1. Clips that demonstrate the actual mathematics at work, such as seeing Abbott and Costello describe how 28 divided by 7 is 13.
  2. Clips that are used as a hook or humorous introduction to a topic, such as watching Lucy and Ethel wrapping chocolates on a conveyor belt prior to solving problems relating to conveyor belts and sequences.

You’ll find movie and TV clips that help demonstrate or introduce everything from pre-algebra to calculus. And then, you follow up by doing the exercises on the free worksheets. When you get to the site read the introduction and then use the menu at the top of the page to access:

Part 1 – Contains movie clip descriptions and free, printable math worksheets for movie and TV titles such as: 

  • Star Wars – Episode I, The Phantom Menace
  • Star Trek – The Original Series: The Trouble With Tribbles
  • The Matrix Revolutions
  • Die Hard with a Vengeance
  • October Sky
  • Stand and Deliver
  • The Wizard of Oz
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  • ~ And more!

Part 2 – Contains movie clip descriptions and free, printable math worksheets for movie titles such as: 

  • Little Big League
  • Wall-E
  • Father of the Bride
  • Pirates of Penzance
  • Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • Road Runner & Wile E. Coyote – “Hot Rod and Reel”
  • The Simpsons: Bart, the Genius
  • Shrek the Third
  • ~ And more!

Note: The movie ratings run the gamut from G to R, so AS ALWAYS, PARENTS SHOULD PREVIEW MATERIAL TO DETERMINE SUITABILITY OF CONTENT. This is a great way to use technology and pop culture to engage older students in the fun of mathematics.

Free Math Software for Algebra, Geometry & More!

July 13th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, July 13, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

GeoGebra (http://www.geogebra.org/)

 

Age Range: 10 and up (about middle school and beyond with parental supervision)

 

This website provides free, interactive mathematics software for students of many ages that teaches algebra, geometry, graphing, statistics, and calculus.
It’s available in many languages for users around the world and includes: 
  • Lessons
  • Video Tutorials
  • Worksheets
  • Animations
  • and much more!
When you get to the site you’ll see “Featured Materials” that will acquaint you with the materials and how to access them.

It’s helpful to poke around the site, get a feel for the content provided in the software, and then visit the “user forum” to get additional advice.

Notice that as you open each page, a horizontal menu appears on the left to show you similar material.

Resources for Learning Math

May 11th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, May 11, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Math2.org

 

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

Math2.org offers resources for learning math. It is a member of the Web Math Collaboration (WMC), a federation of math websites with the goal of providing “freely accessible open spaces for people to collaborate on and discuss mathematical subjects, help those who have difficulties in mathematics, and provide mathematical resources to the public.”
When you get to the website you’ll see it is very clearly organized and includes: 
  • Math Reference Tables (also available in Spanish!) — All of the most important tables and formulas you need to study math: basic arithmetic facts, trig identities, derivatives and integrals, and even Fourier transforms, all in one convenient place for you to use and review. The conic sections are simply but clearly illustrated, and the calculus even includes proofs!
  • The Math Message Board — Post your math questions in this forum and get answers on this very active board! (As with all forums, children will need adult supervision.) Browse through past questions and enjoy the lively give-and-take in this helpful math-loving community; try your hand at verifying the solutions to any that catch your interest.
  • Have A Math Question? — This section refers those with questions to either the Math Message Board (described above) or to the “Ask Dr. Math” website.
  • Links — A list of links to other websites that offer everything from general math resources and lesson plans for grades K-16 to an extensive collection of mathematical theorems and formulas.
  • Other Resources — You’ll find an English-Spanish math dictionary here! Bonus: If you would like to see what else this webpage author has created, click on “Dave Manura” at the bottom of the page.

Mudd Math Fun Facts

May 4th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, May 4, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Mudd Math Fun Facts

 

Age Range: 12 and up (Grades 6-adult, children with parental supervision)

 

Today’s website was originally designed as a warm-up activity for calculus courses taught at Harvard. In an effort to help college students see the interesting stuff that motivates mathematicians to study the subject, a professor began to tell his students “Fun Facts” – or daily mathematical tidbits from all areas of mathematics (not just calculus), meant to arouse their curiosity and fascination with the subject. The students loved it. That motivated the professor to archive the “Fun Facts” that he and his colleagues collected at today’s website. Even though this is designed for college level students, there are ideas and math patterns that will fascinate and challenge students of many grade levels and abilities.
When you get to the site you will see a brief introduction. Then, use the combination menu and search engine on the left to get “Fun Facts” about: 
  • Algebra
  • Geometry
  • Calculus
  • Number Theory
  • Probability
  • Topology
  • and more!
A nice feature is that you can search by difficulty level from “Easy” to “Advanced” in any of the subject categories. Once you make your selection a new page appears with a menu of “Fun Facts” from which to choose. Click on any one of these and a new page opens that explains and illustrates the concept. “Fun Facts” not only challenges those skilled in mathematics, but it provides a way to give less skilled students a glimpse of advanced mathematics. Students will become familiar with math vocabulary and “buzzwords” even if they don’t fully understand what they mean. It might just spring-board their curiosity to do some further research that will enhance their math education.

Easter Egg Math for K-12!

March 30th, 2015

 

It’s Monday, March 30, 2015, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Various

 

Age Range: All (varies by website, children with parental supervision)

 

Easter and Spring Festivals are here! Eggs are everywhere in omelets to Easter baskets! Here are some fun ways to use eggs to learn math…See below for recommended websites. 
The egg’s interesting mathematical properties are explored at this site that seems to be designed for students in junior high and up. Explore the symmetry of eggs, dividing eggs equally, spherical geometry, and embryo calculus to determine how many cells are in a chick and more. When you get to the site just click on the module that interests you on the menu, and a new page opens with lesson plans and activities.
Print out this worksheet with egg-themed math word problems for elementary grades.
This website offers an Easter-egg-themed math lesson for Kindergartners in a classroom. It can easily be adjusted for use in a homeschool or as a family activity.
Recycle your egg cartons into a fun math game that kids of all ages will enjoy!
Are you an egghead? Kids (grade 3 and up) will have to use their eggs to figure out the answer to this reverse cryptogram.
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