Posts Tagged ‘ballet’

Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker

December 15th, 2018

 

It’s Saturday, December 15, 2018, and time for Music at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Moscow Ballet

(www.nutcracker.com/gallery/great-russian-nutcracker)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Adapted from E.T.A. Hoffmann’s story, The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, set to the music of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, and originally choreographed by Marius Petipa, The Nutcracker is a beloved classic Christmas story and one of the most popular and recognized ballets of all time.

At this website, visitors can watch 9 videos of the Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. The Moscow Ballet’s version of The Nutcracker includes variations of the traditional story which include a setting in Moscow and the inclusion of Russian folk characters.

When arriving at the link, select from the videos including: 

  • The Nutcracker Doll
  • The Snow Forest
  • Dove of Peace
  • Arabian Variation
  • Pas De Deux
  • and more!

If you want to see the Kissy Doll and Harlequin video, use this link instead. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRfsRPfU864) The embedded YouTube videos are mostly about a minute long and can be viewed in full screen mode if you wish. When you have finished watching the videos, learn more about the Great Russian Nutcracker by selecting the “About Us” option in the menu bar, then choose “About the Great Russian Nutcracker” and/or “History of the Nutcracker”.

Visitors can also view videos from other ballets performed by the Moscow Ballet such as Romeo & Juliet, Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty, and Cinderella, by selecting “Gallery”. 

Whether you have an aspiring young ballet dancer in your home or simply want to share the holiday tradition of this colorful ballet, this website will help bring the magic into your home.

How Nutcrackers Are Made and More!

December 7th, 2018

 

It’s Friday, December 7, 2018, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Nutcracker Museum

(nutcrackermuseum.com/gallery2.html)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

People of all ages love nutcrackers — as much for their functionality as their whimsical design. At this time of year, we see nutcrackers in holiday displays and on dining room tables. The glorious strains of music from Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker Ballet” permeate our homes as well as the mall, reinforcing our fascination with nutcrackers during the holidays. But what is the history of the nutcracker? How are they made? How many designs are there? How many different ways are there to crack a nut?


Answers to these questions and more await you at the Leavenworth Nutcracker Museum, located in the state of Washington, and the destination of today’s virtual field trip. When you get to the site, you will see the words “A virtual tour of the museum.” Below are 2 sections of photographs of some of the “residents.” (Click on the photos to see larger images). 

Then using the menu at the top, look under “The Museum” to learn about antique nutcrackers, the history of the museum and more. Under the “Information” menu, learn even more including: 

  • The History of Nutcrackers
  • Nuts are Good for You – Check out the videos on cracking a nut and styles of nutcrackers
  • Museum in Germany – Watch a video (with some German narration) of the nutcrackers displayed there, including the largest nutcracker in the world! (Parents, as always, should preview videos to determine suitability).

You can cap this off by watching video clips of the Nutcracker Ballet here.

Dance Appreciation for Kids!

September 25th, 2010

Hi!  It’s Saturday, September 25, 2010 and time for Electives at ClickSchooling!

Recommended Website:
ThinkQuest: And They Kept On Dancing

Grade Range: 9-18 (younger kids and non-readers will enjoy aspects with adult guidance)

ThinkQuest is a website that archives educational projects by students for students. At this website you’ll find a terrific compilation of information, games, and activities that help kids learn to appreciate a variety of dance styles.

When you get to the site, you’ll see a hodgepodge of selections on a colorful menu that includes:

*Ballet – Learn basic ballet moves, the history of ballet, and discover some famous ballets.

*Jazz – Review basic jazz moves and concepts along with a brief history of jazz.

*Modern – Get a brief overview of the history of Modern Dance.

*Folk – Click on a map and learn about folk dances worldwide!

*Tap – Read a brief history of tap dancing.

Then, use the menu located at the top of each dance page to read the biographies of famous people from every dance genre. You can also play a game of “Dance Hangman,” test your knowledge of dance, and learn about dance in the movies.

Virtual Field Trip to a Nutcracker Museum and More!

December 15th, 2006

Recommended Website:
Leavenworth Nutcracker Museum

People of all ages love nutcrackers — as much for their functionality as
their whimsical design. At this time of year, we see nutcrackers in holiday
displays and on dining room tables. The glorious strains of music from
Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker Ballet” permeate our homes as well as the mall,
reinforcing our fascination with nutcrackers during the holidays. But what
is the history of the nutcracker? How are they made? How many designs are
there? How many different ways are there to crack a nut?

Answers to these questions and more await you at the Leavenworth Nutcracker
Museum, located in the state of Washington, and the destination of today’s
virtual field trip. When you get to the site, you will see the words “Museum
Tour” along with a text introduction and photographs (click on the photos to
see larger images). Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on “Next” to
read a short but fascinating history of nutcrackers complete with terrific
photographs of varying designs from ancient times to present day. But that’s
not all…

The Museum has designed an entirely separate website all about nutcrackers
just for kids! It includes 5 free Lesson plans that include slide shows
depicting how nutcrackers are made and a photo gallery of collectible
nutcrackers! Here’s the gold…

Recommended Website:
Kids Love Nutcrackers

When you get to the site you will see the Lesson Index that includes:

Lesson 1 — Wooden Toy Soldier Nutcrackers. Click on this to learn about the
history of these traditional nutcrackers. Scroll to the bottom of the page
to watch a SLIDE SHOW OF THE NUTCRACKER MANUFACTURING PROCESS.

Lesson 2 — Discover what materials are used to make nutcrackers. See photos
of ancient and modern metal, wood, and porcelain nutcrackers.

Lesson 3 — What kind of nutcrackers are there? Archeologists have
discovered 4,000 year old rocks used as nutcrackers. You’ll be surprised at
the variety of tools people have used to crack a nut.

Lesson 4 — Find out all of the odd ways to crack a nut by watching a
wonderful SLIDE SHOW OF UNUSUAL NUTCRACKERS (located at the bottom of the
page).

Lesson 5 — Where are nutcrackers made? Check the world map on this page to
find out. Directly below it you’ll find photos of nutcrackers made in
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, England, France, Germany, India,
Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, the United States, and
Yugoslavia.

This is a really fun way to learn some history and social studies that tie
in with the holidays.

Interactive Ballet Dictionary!

May 20th, 2006

Recommended Website:
Ballet Dictionary

At this website, the American Ballet Theatre offers an interactive ballet dictionary. When you get to the site look at the list of ballet words and terms on the left side of the screen. They are in alphabetical order. Click on any one and a new page opens with a definition of the term in text along with highlighted links to more information. On most of the pages you will also see a logo or a smaller screen. Click on it to watch a film clip of someone from American Ballet Theatre performing the move!

It seems to me this would be an especially helpful tool for anyone studying ballet. For those who don’t, just understanding what the terminology means — and being able to see it demonstrated — may enhance appreciation for ballet.

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