Archive for the ‘social sciences’ category

History Channel – Christmas

December 6th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, December 6, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

History Channel – Christmas

(www.history.com/topics/christmas)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

The Christmas holiday is steeped in traditions and customs. This page from the History Channel provides texts and videos relating to the history of many of the traditions practiced today.

When you get to the site, you’ll see the topics covered including: 

  • Christmas Traditions Worldwide
  • History of Christmas
  • History of Christmas Trees
  • Santa Claus

Videos (with commercials) are in each section so, parents, as always, will want to preview the material prior to allowing their student to use the material to be sure that the information presented aligns with their family beliefs and standards.

If you can get over the commercials embedded into the videos, there is still a lot of interesting and educational value to this website.

The CIA for Kids!

November 29th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, November 29, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

CIA for Kids

(www.cia.gov/kids-page)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

When you think about the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency), “kids” is probably not the first word that comes to mind. So, you may be surprised to see what they offer for children on their “Kids’Zone” page.

Find out about the history of the CIA and what they do including how they use dogs and pigeons to gather intelligence. You can also try your hand at breaking a secret code!

When you get to the site you will see a menu on the right side of your screen that includes: 

  • K-5th Grade – Click on this link and a new page opens with a brief introduction to the CIA for younger elementary grade students. Look for the menu on the left side of the screen that includes an opportunity to learn all about the CIA Seal, find out about the CIA K-9 Corp (kids will love reading the personal stories of 23 different “spy” dogs), and get a bird’s eye view of the CIA (includes info about how carrier pigeons help the CIA).
  • 6th-12th Grade Homepage – Click on this link to access info designed for older students including: 
    • Who We Are & What We Do – Includes a more in-depth look at the mission, structure, and the operations of the CIA.
    • Getting a Job at the CIA – Explains the qualifications one must have to work for the CIA.
    • Operation History – When you click this, don’t miss “one of the most secret museums in the world” to take a virtual tour of the CIA museum and its artifacts. More advanced students might like to read the “History of American Intelligence” and “The History of the CIA” – in-depth looks at the history of the CIA from the Revolutionary War through WWII. Of particular interest for older students are the spy biographies which can be accessed by clicking “The CIA Hall of Fame.” Here you will find several U.S. presidents (including George Washington, Herbert Hoover, and George Bush), Nathan Hale, Harriet Tubman, and even a heroic spy who, with several names and only one leg, was the only female ever to earn the Distinguished Service Cross, one of the highest honors issued by the U.S. military.

Once you’ve checked out the grade-specific sections, have some fun by clicking on “Games” on the menu. Junior spies of every age, will have fun with a CIA puzzle, word find, and trying to decipher a secret code.

As always, parents should preview this material to determine if the content is suitable for their own children.

Create Animated Maps

November 8th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, November 8, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Animaps

(www.animaps.com/#!home)

Age Range: 12-18 (Grades 7-12, with parental supervision)

 

Create fun and interesting animated maps with this site that “extends the MyMaps feature of Google Maps by letting you create maps with markers that move, images and text that pop up on cue, and lines and shapes that change over time.”

When arriving at today’s link, read over the information, check out some example animated maps, and, to get a good understanding of how to use Animaps, be sure to watch the “Basics Tutorial.” You can check out more maps that others have created under the “Most viewed” and “Latest maps” sections, however, as this is a public access site, be sure to review a map prior to allowing your children to do so to ensure they are suitable for your family. 

To create a map, visitors must either create a free Animaps account or log in using their Facebook account. This will provide a place to easily keep track of the maps you have created. Along with the ability to add multiple route markers for specific times, you can add text, images, icons, and more to your map. A fun feature is the ability to select a mode of transportation and change them along your route so that once your map is created, when you play it back, you can watch it travel your route. You can even share your maps or embed them into a web page if you have one.

While learning and creating new maps may take some time, the creative educational uses will make it worth the effort. This tool could not only be used to teach geography, but also used for other subjects. Some ideas for maps we came up with include: 

  • Create map history timelines showing where and when events took place.
  • Show the journeys of the explorers.
  • Plan out dream vacation trips and include travel cost information and points of interest to visit.
  • During an election, plot out the route of a candidate’s state visits.
  • Create a “book report” indicating settings or destinations from the story. (Around the World in 80 Days comes to mind as a perfect choice.)
  • Have foreign language students show locations where the language is spoken.

Map creation is limited only by the visitor’s imagination.

Be a History Explorer

November 1st, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, November 1, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Smithsonian’s History Explorer

(historyexplorer.si.edu/)

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

Explore American history with the hundreds of lesson plans, activities, interactives, media and much more available at this website from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

The homepage highlights featured topics, artifacts and resources. Visitors can use the search box on the right-hand side of the page to search for their topical interest which can easily be further refined by resource type, grade level, historical era, and/or cross-curricular connections. Once the list of resources populates, make your selection, review the information about the resource, then select the “Get Resource” button to access the material. Please note that some of the units bring you to an outside website while others are located on the Smithsonian site, so as always be sure to preview prior to allowing students to use this site. 

Visitors can also choose to browse content using the upper menu to locate resources by: 

  • Lessons & Activities – Search for specific lessons and activities to support your students’ learning.
  • Media – Explore relevant audio, video and interactive resources.
  • Museum Artifacts – Browse collections to use for object-based learning.
  • Themes – Dig deeper into resources focused on a major theme in American history including: 
    • A Nation We Build Together
    • American Experiments
    • Protest and Civic Action, the Civil Rights Movement
    • The American Revolution and World Wars
    • Presidential History, Politics and Voting
    • STEM Resources
    • Westward Expansion
    • Immigration
    • Hispanic Heritage Month
    • Teaching with Drama
    • Agriculture History
    • And more
  • Books – Check out the list of history related books to add to your reading list.
  • Teacher Resources – Find help for using the site and primary sources in teaching history as well as archived webinars and more.
  • Web Links – Examine additional links to other history websites.

Be sure to bookmark this website as it will be a valuable resource through all your American history studies.

Early American History through Caricatures

October 29th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, October 25, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

America in Caricature: 1765-1865

(www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/cartoon/cartoons.html)

Age Range: 14-18 (Grades 9-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website, sponsored by the Lilly Library, offers an online exhibition of political cartoons done in caricatures – pictures of a person or thing drawn with gross exaggeration of its most characteristic features.

The idea is to express satire and criticism of political and social agendas, especially during times of discontent or upheaval. While caricatures are always accompanied by text, it is secondary to the portrait that conveys the meaning through imagery intended to provoke a response from the viewer. The political cartoons in this exhibit depict times of turbulence in American history ranging from the Revolutionary War to the War of 1812 and then to the presidential elections of 1860 and 1864 which brought Abraham Lincoln to the White House.

As a ClickScholar said when she recommended the site, “See Abe Lincoln win the presidential race because of his long legs! See the Union map being unsuccessfully glued back together prior to the Civil War! See it all through the eyes of folks who were actually there. Great stuff! :)”

When you get to the site you will see a brief introduction and a menu below it that includes: 

  • About Caricatures – Read the fascinating history of this art form.
  • The War of 1812 – View the cartoons and read the text to get a feel for what satirists were trying to convey at the time.
  • The Colonial Years – Caricatures of The Stamp Act and its repeal, and the “Bloody Massacre” also known as “The Boston Massacre”
  • Abraham Lincoln 1860-1865 – Political cartoonists depict the elections of 1860 and 1864, as well as The Civil War.

This website provides a brief, but fascinating look at early American history through the eyes of talented illustrators with specific political views. It’s a great adjunct to any study of early American history – probably geared more for middle school students and up.

Discover the History of the Lightbulb

October 18th, 2018

 

It’s Thursday, October 18, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Lighting a Revolution

(americanhistory.si.edu/lighting/index.htm)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

Explore the history of the lightbulb with this web presentation from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

This site takes visitors through the steps involved in the process of the invention of the lightbulb by Thomas Edison in the 19th century and then examines the major developments made to lamps in the 20th century.

After reading through the introductory text on the home page, students can begin their exploration by selecting from the three “doors” on the page: 

  • Invention Factory: 19th Century Electric Lamps
  • Invention Factory: 20th Century Electric Lamps
  • Guest Lounge & Library

The “Invention Factory” sections are broken down again into the 5 steps of inventing: 

  • Store Room: Knowledge & Equipment for Inventors (Step 1: Preconditions) – Dig into what previously discovered technology and inventions help in the creation of the new product.
  • Laboratory: Caution Inventors at Work (Step 2: Invention) – Learn about the people, places, events, and discoveries of lighting inventors.
  • Marketing Department: Promotions for All Occasions (Step 3: Promotion) – Gain an understanding of the importance promoting an invention has in bringing new inventions to the public.
  • Competition: Inventors: Have Patents Out & Ready for Inspection (Step 4: Competition) – Discover the importance of competition in the world of inventions.
  • Consequences: Intended & Otherwise (Step 5: Consequences) – Examine the results of the invention of the lightbulb and its impact on history.

Each section presents concise information about the topic accompanied by exhibit images.

The “Guest Lounge & Library” provides visitors opportunities for further research by providing exhibit scripts and notes, a time-line photo gallery of lamp inventors, links to other informative sites about Thomas Edison and lighting, history, technology, and energy files with additional images and information relating to lighting including ink blotters, patents, the science behind electric lighting and lightbulbs, and significance of energy efficiency.

Add this site to your list of resources for history and inventor studies.

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