Archive for the ‘social sciences’ category

The History of Christmas Hymns and Carols

December 18th, 2014

 

It’s Thursday, December 18, 2014, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

The Hymns and Carols of Christmas

 

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

This website provides the history behind Christmas music along with an extensive index of Christmas carols and hymns.
When you get to the site you will see a brief introduction. Below it is a way to search for a song alphabetically by title.

Below the alphabetical search box is a link to the “Full Index” of songs archived at this site. Use either method to find a song of interest, click on it, and the whole story behind the song – it’s history, tradition, who wrote the words and music, etc., is displayed.

Note: If you use the “Full Index” to search for a song, you will be surprised to see that the site includes not only the original song, but any subsequent versions or parodies of it as well. If you click on a song title – and it doesn’t look like the one you remember, go back to the index and search again for the original version of the song.

Once you are through exploring the history of individual songs, click on “History of Carols” on the menu at the top of the screen. There, you will find the history of the tradition of singing carols at Christmas from the Middle Ages through the Victorian era right up to 20th Century compositions.

History Channel – Christmas

December 11th, 2014

 

It’s December 11, 2014, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

History Channel – Christmas

 

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

The Christmas holiday is steeped in traditions and customs. This page from the History Channel provides videos and texts relating to the history of many of the traditions practiced today. When arriving at the link you will find two sections, “Christmas Videos” and “Christmas in Depth”.
In the “Christmas Videos” section you will find short videos (usually 2-4 minutes long) covering such topics as Christmas history, food, traditions, decorations, and even a 3-minute video about strange Christmas Traditions.
In the “Christmas in Depth” section, not only are there a few more short videos but there is also informative text to further build upon what is presented in the videos. Topics covered include:
  • History of Christmas (includes video)
  • History of Christmas Trees (includes video)
  • Christmas Traditions Worldwide (includes video)
  • Santa Claus (includes video)
  • Christmas Traditions, Past and Present
  • 7 Historical Events that Took Place on Christmas
  • Why do we kiss under the mistletoe?
  • Why is Christmas celebrated on December 25?
  • Christmas by the Numbers Infographic
  • Oyster Stew on Christmas Eve: An American Tradition
  • Mincemeat: It’s What’s for (Christmas) Dinner

As always, parents will want to preview videos and material prior to allow their student to use the material to be sure that the information presented aligns with their family beliefs and standards. If you can get over the commercials embedded into the videos, there is still a lot of interesting and educational value to this website.

Native Words, Native Warriors

December 4th, 2014

 

It’s Thursday, December 4, 2014, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Native Words, Native Warriors

 

Age Range: 11-17 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

American Indian “Code Talkers” contributed significantly to the war efforts of World War I and World War II. This website, a companion to the Smithsonian Institution exhibition, Native Words, Native Warriors, provides an in-depth lesson plan that explores the lives of Code Talkers.
When arriving at the link above, you are presented with an Overview of the Website that provides a brief description of what will be covered in this unit. Using the upper navigation bar, you may choose to work through the unit in a “Text-Only” version, but many students may prefer the Flash Version (link located at the end of the navigation bar.) In the Flash version, audio and images work together to present information along with additional text. Listen to real Code Talkers tell their stories throughout the presentation. Use the upper navigation on the flash page to move through the chapters, which include: 
  • Introduction: Code Talkers
  • Languages: Living the Culture
  • Boarding Schools: Struggling with Cultural Repression
  • Code Talking: Intelligence and Bravery
  • Coming Home: Strength through Culture
  • Survival: Hard Times and Racism
  • Recognition: Medals and Praise
As you work through the presentation, “code” words in the native language with the English translations are presented throughout. At the end of each chapter, there is an online workbook activity that students can do then print out for their records or thought-provoking questions to encourage further discussion. In the Code Talking chapter, students will use the Navajo’s Code Talker Dictionary online to write coded messages.

Visit the Gallery by selecting the link on the right hand side of the presentation window to view over 170 images.

You can always return to the text version of the chapters or return to the lesson plan by selecting the links under the presentation window. You may also wish to check out the Resources list for further study.

This website provides thorough and interesting insight into the world of Code Talkers.

Investigate the First Thanksgiving

November 20th, 2014

 

It’s Thursday, November 20, 2014, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Plimoth Plantation: You Are The Historian

 

Age Range: 6-13 (Grades 1-8, with parental supervision)

 

Interested in learning about the history of Thanksgiving? Look no further than this award-winning website produced by Plimoth Plantation (the spelling is correct). Here, kids and their families can discover what really happened at the first Thanksgiving and separate the myths from the facts.

When you get to the site you will see a brief introduction. Notice the Teacher’s Guide text link under the main image – you may want to click on that if you prefer a more lesson-structured approach and guideline to exploring this website. You may also access the guide within the investigation presentation by selection the Teacher’s Guide icon.

Eager learners can also jump right in and begin their investigation by clicking on the image or the text link “HERE!” A new page opens to a multi-media extravaganza with beautiful sights and sounds. Your hosts invite you to use clues to unearth the real history behind the Thanksgiving feast. Click on “enter” to begin the journey. A new page opens with a menu that includes:

  • Fact or Myth – What’s true and what’s not about the people and events surrounding the first Thanksgiving? Did the guests eat cranberries and turkey? What you discover may surprise you.
  • The Evidence – View and read a primary source document – the only existing written, first-hand-account of the feast. A terrific introduction to exploring primary source documents – don’t miss it!
  • The Wampanoag People – Learn about the Native People who were at the first Thanksgiving, and how they celebrate the different seasons of the year.
  • The English Colonists – Take a trip back in time to the home of a Pilgrim and find out how they prepared for the Thanksgiving feast.
  • The Path to 1621 – Find out about the events that led up to the First Thanksgiving.

This is an engaging website presenting historically accurate evidence of the first Thanksgiving or harvest celebration in colonial America that kids of all ages are certain to enjoy.

Narratives and Timelines for History

November 13th, 2014

 

It’s Thursday, November 13, 2014, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Historyworld

 

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website, written by Bamber Gascoigne from the United Kingdom, provides about 300 interactive world history narratives and over 10,000 events in searchable timelines. The narratives present information in a concise manner and contain in-text links to other topics. The timelines allow visitors to easily search for specific events relating to a topic during a specific time.
When you arrive at the website use the menu at the top to select whether you want to read “Histories”, explore “Timelines”, take a “Quiz”, or select “More . . .” to choose:
  • Encyclopedia of Britain – Browse over 5000 entries on the history, culture, and life of Britain
  • Wellcome History of Medicine – Discover the history of medicine from the world’s largest medical charity
  • Places in History – Global – Explore the global-plotted Google Maps and see what events happened where
  • Places in History – Local – Examine this ongoing project using Google Maps to find exact positions of historical sites
When arriving at the “Histories” page, you can search alphabetically for historical topics across the globe from Aegean Civilization to Zoroastrianism. Some narrations include images and the in-text links give visitors the opportunity to build on their understanding of events, people, and concepts.
After selecting “Timelines” from the menu, you are able to enter a specific topic and/or year into the search engine. Use the “Historyworld Timelines” text link under the search box to be taken to the “Single-Subject Timelines” page for a list of pre-set timelines. Timeline entries have clickable icons on either side of them that when selected open to Google search engine pages for relevant topics, associated images, related entries from Historyworld, links to other timelines, or Google maps.
There are currently two quizzes available to take:
  • Quiz – Take this timed quiz to test yourself on your historical knowledge
  • ThenWhatNext – Challenge yourself to put people or events in the correct order.

This ad-supported website provides a great overview of history around the world without a lot of distracting bells and whistles.

Harper’s Weekly for History

November 6th, 2014

 

It’s Thursday, November 6, 2014, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

HarpWeek

 

Age Range: 12-18 (Grades 7-12, with parental supervision)

 

Harper’s Weekly is considered an important primary resource chronicling the week-to-week life of America for the 56-year time period from 1857-1912. This website provides access to a user friendly indexed database of Harper’s Weekly. Visitors will find scanned images of the pages from the weekly as well as a transcript of those pages. Pages include the:
  • news stories
  • illustrations
  • cartoons
  • editorials
  • biographies
  • literature
  • advertisements

But it doesn’t stop there. There are educational extensions using Harper Weekly resources. Historical topics covered include:

  • The Civil War
  • The 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments
  • Presidential elections: 1860-1912
  • The Making of Modern America

The “Cartoon of the Day” is an interesting peek into the humor of the past. You will also find Simulation Games that include information to the teacher that explains how to implement the simulations and provides background information. Simulation Games include:

  • The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson
  • The Civil War Illustrations Activity: Why Did the North Win the Civil War?
  • The Reconstruction Convention
  • The Ku Klux Klan Hearings

These are just a sampling of the educational activities available for use in your history studies. There are many more that you will want to check out for yourself.

*Please note that because Harper’s Weekly is a primary resource, some of the language from the time may be considered objectionable by today’s standards. As always, please preview this website material before allowing your children to use this resource.

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