Archive for the ‘science’ category

Shrinking Gummy Bears & Polymer Science

January 17th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 17, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Kids’ Macrogalleria

(pslc.ws/macrog/kidsmac/index.htm)

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

This educational website is a FABULOUS one for helping kids learn all about polymers. What’s a polymer? Go to the website and find out.

When you get to the site you’ll see a fun intro page with a menu that includes:

  • What is a Polymer? – To get to the bottom of it you’ll learn about atoms, elements and molecules and then discover some great and not-so-great things about polymers.
  • Where are Polymers? – Explore the online mall to discover polymers in shoes, clothing, auto parts, pool supplies, bagpipes, toys, food and more!
  • Types of Polymers – There are many kinds of polymers – both natural and synthetic. Explore cellulose, rayon, starch, rubber, proteins, gelatin, epoxy, nylon, polyester, polystyrene, PVC, silicone and more to learn about polymers that are tough and hard as well as polymers that bend and stretch.
  • Making Stuff – Learn how things are made from polymers. Discover composites, crosslinking, copolymers, and how polymers are made from monomers.

Play online games, including a mystery adventure about musical instruments under Flash Activities! Take polymer quizzes. Very young children may enjoy the “Find Paul” game (under Just for Fun) – go all over the website looking for Paul the Lemur, then enjoy his interactive coloring book and some activity pages that go with it.

This is a fun and engaging way to explore the science of polymers!

Make Your Own Virtual Kaleidoscope

January 10th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 10, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Make Your Own Virtual Kaleidoscope

(www.krazydad.com/kaleido/)

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

This website allows you to make an online virtual kaleidoscope from any image.

Simply find an image you like on the Internet, and paste the image URL into the space provided at the website. Then, when
your image is loaded, simply mouse over it or click and drag your mouse over the image to make all kinds of kaleidoscopic
image variations. If you settle on one you like, you can create a JPEG of the image and send it to a friend to see.
(The image is good for 24 hours.)

If you prefer to make a real kaleidoscope, you’ll find instructions for kids at National Geographic Kids.

(http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/activities/funscience/be-dazzled/)

See How Ornaments & Artificial Trees Are Made

December 20th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, December 20, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

See How Ornaments & Artificial Trees Are Made

(See below.)

Age Range: 8 and up (Grades 3 and up; children with parental supervision)

 

The ad-supported ScienceChannel.com website provides all kinds of free “How It’s Made” videos, including two videos (linked below) that explain how glass ornaments and artificial Christmas trees are made.

When you get to the site, a 30-second video commercial launches. When the advertisement is over, you can watch the educational videos that include: 

(www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/videos/how-its-made-christmas-ornaments/)


This video demonstrates how glass blowers create Christmas tree ornament bulbs and figurines, and then shows how they are colored and decorated. You’ll also discover how the stems are made and capped before the ornament is boxed and shipped to stores.

(www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/videos/how-its-made-artificial-christmas-trees/)


This video shows how artificial Christmas trees are made, including building the steel framework. You’ll find out how sheets of green PVC plastic are shredded to make simulated pine needles. Watch, as workers crimp the artificial foliage together, assemble branches, and attach them to the framework to build a holiday tree.

Holiday Science

December 13th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, December 13, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Holiday Science

(see below)

Age Range: All  (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Here are free science resources for some holiday cheer.


Track Santa on Christmas Eve

http://www.noradsanta.org/

This website is sponsored by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) which is the joint American and Canadian military organization responsible for the aerospace defense of the United States and Canada that was created in 1958. Every year NORAD tracks Santa’s whereabouts so that children throughout the world can determine his location and how close he is to delivering goodies to their house on Christmas Eve. At the site you can get the scoop on the science behind tracking Santa including radar, satellites, Santa Cam, and jet fighter aircraft

HowStuffWorks: How Holiday Lights Work

http://christmas.howstuffworks.com/christmas-lights1.htm

Get the information on how those mini decorative lights are made. Clear explanations and great illustrations and photos help you understand how these incandescent bulbs work, why the removal of one bulb in a strand can break the circuit, and how they get the bulbs to blink.

Science I.Q. – The Gingerbread Man

http://www.scienceiq.com/Facts/TheGingerbreadMan.cfm

Ewwwww! It’s hard to believe, but at the Science I.Q. website they explain that gingerbread originated because of a wheat disease known as “stinking smut” that “replaces the wheat grain with a black powder of spores that has a strong fishy odor.” Learn more about it at the website, although it won’t exactly whet your appetite for gingerbread.

Free Cup Stacking Tutorial Videos

December 6th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, December 6, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Speed Stacks

(www.speedstacks.com/learn/?lang=en)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

Cup Stacking (also known as Sport Stacking and Speed Stacking) is an amazing sport of fitness, agility, concentration and quickness.

Essentially, cup stackers take matching cups of any shape or size, and stack them in pyramids and then unstack them at an unusually high rate of speed.

At this website you can explore this craze and watch cup stacking tutorial videos. Learn how to speed stack – a fun sporting idea that can be done indoors or outdoors to satisfy that P.E. requirement.

When you get to the site you’ll see the introduction video and 7 other “How To” training or rules videos you can watch for free. 

This is a commercial site that sells stacking cups, mats, and various other paraphernalia – but you don’t have to buy a thing to watch the tutorials.

If your kids think this looks like fun, a set of stacking cups may make great stocking stuffers!

The Science of Thanksgiving Dinner!

November 22nd, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, November 22, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Various

(See below.)

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Visit the following websites and amaze your Thanksgiving dinner guests with scientific knowledge of the chemical composition and scientific aspects of the feast!

How Pop-Up Turkey Timers Work

How does this little device imitate a thermometer?
 
Everyday Mysteries: Sweet Potato or Yam?

Learn the scientific difference between a sweet potato and a yam.
 
WKSU: The Chemistry of Thanksgiving Dinner

Listen to 3-minute audio clip in which professors talk about proteins, peptides, alkenes, amino acids, tryptophan and more. Discover the chemistry and molecular structure lurking in your Thanksgiving dinner.
 
The Chemical Make-Up of a Potato

Discover the chemical content and nutritional value of a potato. Do green potatoes really contain a deadly toxin?
 
The Science of Cranberry Sauce

Find out why cranberry sauces that use the same ingredients produce different results. Why does one become a gelatin?

css.php