Archive for the ‘science’ category

Free Cup Stacking Tutorial Videos

December 6th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, December 6, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Speed Stacks

(www.speedstacks.com/learn/?lang=en)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

Cup Stacking (also known as Sport Stacking and Speed Stacking) is an amazing sport of fitness, agility, concentration and quickness.

Essentially, cup stackers take matching cups of any shape or size, and stack them in pyramids and then unstack them at an unusually high rate of speed.

At this website you can explore this craze and watch cup stacking tutorial videos. Learn how to speed stack – a fun sporting idea that can be done indoors or outdoors to satisfy that P.E. requirement.

When you get to the site you’ll see the introduction video and 7 other “How To” training or rules videos you can watch for free. 

This is a commercial site that sells stacking cups, mats, and various other paraphernalia – but you don’t have to buy a thing to watch the tutorials.

If your kids think this looks like fun, a set of stacking cups may make great stocking stuffers!

The Science of Thanksgiving Dinner!

November 22nd, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, November 22, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Various

(See below.)

Age Range: 9-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

Visit the following websites and amaze your Thanksgiving dinner guests with scientific knowledge of the chemical composition and scientific aspects of the feast!

How Pop-Up Turkey Timers Work

How does this little device imitate a thermometer?
 
Everyday Mysteries: Sweet Potato or Yam?

Learn the scientific difference between a sweet potato and a yam.
 
WKSU: The Chemistry of Thanksgiving Dinner

Listen to 3-minute audio clip in which professors talk about proteins, peptides, alkenes, amino acids, tryptophan and more. Discover the chemistry and molecular structure lurking in your Thanksgiving dinner.
 
The Chemical Make-Up of a Potato

Discover the chemical content and nutritional value of a potato. Do green potatoes really contain a deadly toxin?
 
The Science of Cranberry Sauce

Find out why cranberry sauces that use the same ingredients produce different results. Why does one become a gelatin?

Free, Fun Science Experiments

November 15th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, November 15, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Joey Green-The Mad Scientist

(www.joeygreen.com/madscientist/index.html)

Age Range: 7-18 (Grades 2-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website has 7 fun science experiments that you can do at home for free. (You can download 100 Experiments for $2.99!)

When you get to the site you’ll see the 7 highlighted experiments: 

  • Balloon Rocket
  • Edible Glass
  • Fried Marbles
  • Magic Crystal Garden
  • Plastic Milk
  • Seesawing Candle
  • Underwater Fireworks

Click on any one and a new page opens outlining the materials you’ll need, and how to perform the experiment. 

NOTE: There are randomly generated Google advertisements that may be inappropriate for young children. Parents should not only preview the site, but supervise any exploration of the site. Better yet, parents can visit the site, print out the experiment, trim the ads (if needed), and do the experiments offline with their children.

Science Postcards

November 8th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, November 8, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Science Postcards

(www.sciencepostcards.com/)

Age Range: 6-10 (Grades 1-5, with parental supervision)

 

Today’s website from New Zealand encourages development of scientific exploration through children’s literature. The idea is to read one of the recommended books, and then the “teacher” sends a “Science Postcard” themed around that book title to a student. Upon receiving the postcard, the student is inspired to engage in a science activity that relates to the book they just read. The science activity is downloadable/printable at the Science Postcard website after registering.

There are eight, free science postcards and activities that include: 

  1. Book Title: Duck in the Truck – Science Activity: “Science Friction” (Forces)
  2. Book Title: Sidewalk Circus – Science Activity: “Shadow Secrets” (Light)
  3. Book Title: Cork on the Ocean – Science Activity: “Traffic Light Straws” (Density)
  4. Book Title: The King’s Bubbles – Science Activity: “Bubble Magic” (Forces)
  5. Book Title: Tarawera’s Pink Terrace Children – Science Activity: “Fiery Eruptions” (Volcanoes)
  6. Book Title: Mrs. McGinty and the Bizarre Plant – Science Activity: “Flight for Life” (Seeds)
  7. Book Title: Ruby Sings the Blues – Science Activity: “No to Noise” (Sound)
  8. Book Title: Bright Star – Science Activity: Moon Strike (Space)

All of the Science Postcards are available for free at the site. The Teacher and Pupil notes for the first book mentioned above, “Cork on the Ocean,” and the Science activity “Traffic Light Straws” are available free (without registering). All other Teacher and Pupil notes can be downloaded for free, once you have registered on the site.

We registered and noticed that you MUST fill out the “comment” field in order to complete the registration. We simply typed, “Thanks.” That did the job.

Of course, it wouldn’t be necessary to print out a postcard and send it to your children – you could simply do the activities. On the other hand, it might be fun to send the postcard to them (kids love to get mail). Or, you could place one in a conspicuous place somewhere in the house where they are sure to see it and wonder what it is.

This is a fun way to engage kids in science projects that tie into the books they enjoy reading.

Robert Krampf’s Science Experiments

October 25th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, October 25, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Happy Scientist

(thehappyscientist.com/free-science-content)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

This site has free science content that we’ll explore in this review – but you can also become a member ($29.95/year) which allows you to access even more content (specifically, the archives of past newsletters/experiments, and many science videos). We heartily recommend Robert Krampf’s Science Education website.

As for the freebies, when you get to the site you’ll see the list of science videos including: 

  • Definition of a Mineral
  • Paper Petals
  • How They Get the Sparks in a Sparkler
  • Cloud Formation
  • Planets and Pennies
  • and more!

And until October 31, 2016, go to this page to have free access to his Halloween Science videos.

Robert’s experiments are designed to make science fun and understandable. Most are simple enough for very young students, but written to make them fun for adults as well.

Free Alice Computer Programming Software

October 18th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, October 18, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Alice

(www.alice.org/)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 6-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers “Alice” – free educational software from Carnegie Mellon University that teaches students computer programming in a visual, 3-D environment. It makes it easy to create animation for interactive games and videos and much more.

The description from the website best explains it:

Alice is a freely available teaching tool designed to be a student’s first exposure to object-oriented programming. It allows students to learn fundamental programming concepts in the context of creating animated movies and simple video games. In Alice, 3-D objects (e.g., people, animals, and vehicles) populate a virtual world and students create a program to animate the objects.

In Alice’s interactive interface, students drag and drop graphic tiles to create a program, where the instructions correspond to standard statements in a production oriented programming language, such as Java, C++, and C#. Alice allows students to immediately see how their animation programs run, enabling them to easily understand the relationship between the programming statements and the behavior of objects in their animation. By manipulating the objects in their virtual world, students gain experience with all the programming constructs typically taught in an introductory programming course.

When you get to the site you can read the latest news and media coverage about Alice software and then click on the menu items that include: 

  • About Alice – Explains how Alice works – and provides promotional videos you can watch to better understand how to get started.
  • Downloads – Get Free downloads of the software designed specifically for middle school students and/or high school and college students that will allow you to get started learning computer programming in a fun and engaging way.
  • Teaching – Alice provides instructional materials to support teachers and students in classrooms. Resources include textbooks, lessons, tests, and more that you can download and print out.

NOTE: Some of you may have heard about “Alice” in the context of media coverage about one of the developers, Randy Pausch. Pausch, a Carnegie Mellon University professor, died of pancreatic cancer on July 25, 2008 at the age of 47, leaving behind his wife and three young children. He gained world-wide attention through an inspirational “Last Lecture: Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams” in which he recounted how he achieved his childhood dreams of becoming a football player, experiencing zero gravity, and developing Disneyland attractions. There are lessons in his last lecture for all of us. You can view it here. Parents, as always, should preview the lecture to determine suitability of content for their own children.

css.php