Archive for the ‘science’ category

The Great Backyard Bird Count

February 7th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, February 7, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Backyard Bird Count

(www.audubon.org/content/about-great-backyard-bird-count)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

It’s not too early to mark your calendars and get ready to participate in “The Great Backyard Bird Count” scheduled for February 17-20, 2017.

This annual event, sponsored by the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, is your opportunity to join a citizen-science project (for kids, teens, and adults) that helps scientists collect data and investigate far-reaching questions about bird populations.

It only takes as little as 15 minutes on one day. You simply count the birds you see in your backyard and turn in the results. It’s free, fun, and easy – and it helps the scientists to help the birds.

To learn how to participate go to the website http://gbbc.birdcount.org/. Use the menu to register, learn about birds, explore the kids page with fun online games that teach about birds as they entertain, and view the bird photo gallery.

Now, if this sparks your family’s interest in birds, you are sure to enjoy this website: WhatBird.com. Use a tool that helps you to identify a bird by what it looks like. You simply enter its attributes such as habitat, size, color, body shape, bill shape, etc., to drill down results, choosing as many options as you can along the way.

Free Science Activities & Videos

January 31st, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 31, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Siemens Science Day

(www.siemensscienceday.com/index.cfm)

Age Range: 8-11 (Grades 4-6, with parental supervision)

 

This website provides some terrific science lessons, activities and tools. It will also inspire scientific curiosity – not only for kids, but even for parents who aren’t keen in science.

This site is designed for grades 4-6, but don’t let that stop you from exploring what the site has to offer with younger and older students. NOTE: You do have to register to download the lessons in pdf format and to watch the videos. Registration is free and requires the email address and phone number of your school along with information about what subjects and grades you teach. As home educators, we simply supplied a school name (make one up if you don’t already have one), home address, and checked off that we teach all grades and subjects.

When you get to the site you’ll see a brief introduction. Below it is a menu of lessons and fun activities divided into three categories: 

  • Earth Science – Learn about weather, measure the effects of elasticity, and map the ocean, etc.
  • Life Science – Explore the 5 senses, learn the difference between fruits and vegetables, discover how scientists classify organisms, etc.
  • Physical Science – Construct a spectroscope and observe the spectra of various sources of light, discover how different materials absorb solar energy, and use paper chromatography to separate the colors in dyes used to color candies, etc.

Click on any one and a new page opens where you will find: 

  • A brief summary and the objectives of the science lesson/activity
  • A “Download” button to access the lesson in pdf format
  • A video screen where you can watch a video about the lesson
  • A difficulty rating from 1-5 (easy to hard).

Download and fill out a certificate of completion when through.

So, gather the kids around the computer to watch fascinating film clips and learn about the classification system, the three types of matter, parts of a plant cell, the properties of acids and bases, and much more!

Free eBooks

January 18th, 2017

 

It’s Wednesday, January 18, 2017, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Project Gutenberg

(www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Select from over 50,000 free eBooks to read online or download.

Many of you may already be familiar with the Gutenberg Project that is composed of a team of volunteers endeavoring to make as many books as possible available online at no cost. Currently, there are over 50,000 books. Gutenberg makes it easy for you to find just the titles that might interest you.

When you get to the site, click on “Book Categories” in the menu on the left side of the page. When a new page opens, scroll down where you can select from categories such as children’s literature, mysteries, detective stories, science fiction, one-act plays and more! Click on any category, and a new page opens with a list of the free books available. These books can be read online or downloaded.

In the Children’s Literature bookshelf, access the writings of L. Frank Baum, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Edith Nesbit, and Anna Sewell.

Other authors in the bookshelves of Project Gutenberg include Agatha Christie, Andre Norton, Lester del Rey, and Dostoyevsky.

Project Gutenberg has also put together a selection of audio books. Imagine your family enjoying one of the following authors during a long ride in the car or around a crackling fire: 

  • Aesop
  • Hans Christian Andersen
  • L. Frank Baum
  • Charles Dickens
  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Robert Frost
  • The Brothers Grimm
  • Rudyard Kipling
  • Jack London
  • Nietzsche
  • Plato
  • Poe
  • Beatrix Potter
  • Shakespeare
  • Mark Twain
  • Jules Verne
  • H. G. Wells
  • Walt Whitman
  • and more!

To find the list of audio books, start here.

http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Gutenberg:The_Audio_Books_Project


One more thing: Project Gutenberg is always in need of more volunteers willing to proofread one page per day. You or your teen might like to join the team and take advantage of this exciting, fulfilling, skill-building opportunity.

Shrinking Gummy Bears & Polymer Science

January 17th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 17, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Kids’ Macrogalleria

(pslc.ws/macrog/kidsmac/index.htm)

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

This educational website is a FABULOUS one for helping kids learn all about polymers. What’s a polymer? Go to the website and find out.

When you get to the site you’ll see a fun intro page with a menu that includes:

  • What is a Polymer? – To get to the bottom of it you’ll learn about atoms, elements and molecules and then discover some great and not-so-great things about polymers.
  • Where are Polymers? – Explore the online mall to discover polymers in shoes, clothing, auto parts, pool supplies, bagpipes, toys, food and more!
  • Types of Polymers – There are many kinds of polymers – both natural and synthetic. Explore cellulose, rayon, starch, rubber, proteins, gelatin, epoxy, nylon, polyester, polystyrene, PVC, silicone and more to learn about polymers that are tough and hard as well as polymers that bend and stretch.
  • Making Stuff – Learn how things are made from polymers. Discover composites, crosslinking, copolymers, and how polymers are made from monomers.

Play online games, including a mystery adventure about musical instruments under Flash Activities! Take polymer quizzes. Very young children may enjoy the “Find Paul” game (under Just for Fun) – go all over the website looking for Paul the Lemur, then enjoy his interactive coloring book and some activity pages that go with it.

This is a fun and engaging way to explore the science of polymers!

Make Your Own Virtual Kaleidoscope

January 10th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, January 10, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Make Your Own Virtual Kaleidoscope

(www.krazydad.com/kaleido/)

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

This website allows you to make an online virtual kaleidoscope from any image.

Simply find an image you like on the Internet, and paste the image URL into the space provided at the website. Then, when
your image is loaded, simply mouse over it or click and drag your mouse over the image to make all kinds of kaleidoscopic
image variations. If you settle on one you like, you can create a JPEG of the image and send it to a friend to see.
(The image is good for 24 hours.)

If you prefer to make a real kaleidoscope, you’ll find instructions for kids at National Geographic Kids.

(http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/activities/funscience/be-dazzled/)

See How Ornaments & Artificial Trees Are Made

December 20th, 2016

 

It’s Tuesday, December 20, 2016, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

See How Ornaments & Artificial Trees Are Made

(See below.)

Age Range: 8 and up (Grades 3 and up; children with parental supervision)

 

The ad-supported ScienceChannel.com website provides all kinds of free “How It’s Made” videos, including two videos (linked below) that explain how glass ornaments and artificial Christmas trees are made.

When you get to the site, a 30-second video commercial launches. When the advertisement is over, you can watch the educational videos that include: 

(www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/videos/how-its-made-christmas-ornaments/)


This video demonstrates how glass blowers create Christmas tree ornament bulbs and figurines, and then shows how they are colored and decorated. You’ll also discover how the stems are made and capped before the ornament is boxed and shipped to stores.

(www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/videos/how-its-made-artificial-christmas-trees/)


This video shows how artificial Christmas trees are made, including building the steel framework. You’ll find out how sheets of green PVC plastic are shredded to make simulated pine needles. Watch, as workers crimp the artificial foliage together, assemble branches, and attach them to the framework to build a holiday tree.

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