Archive for the ‘science’ category

Science with Leonardo da Vinci!

April 16th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, April 16, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Da Vinci – The Genius

(www.mos.org/leonardo/)

Age Range: 9-14 (Grades 4-8, with parental supervision)

 

Born in 1452, Leonardo da Vinci painted the Mona Lisa, invented the diving bell, and designed the airplane, helicopter and parachute. The Museum of Science, Boston offers this free online exhibit with activities and lesson plans to explore the life, times, and scientific inventions of da Vinci. As the site says, “Though this site was designed to be most appropriate for students in grades four through eight, many of the activities can be adapted for younger or older students as needed.”


When you get to the site you’ll see an introduction and a menu that includes: 

  • Da Vinci – The Artist – Browse his paintings, and learn about techniques of linear perspective. Become Leonardo’s virtual apprentice to play with size and distance and investigate aerial perspective.
  • Da Vinci – The Inventor – Explore Leonardo’s fascination with machines and how they work including wheel and axles, pulley, screw, lever, gears and more. You’ll also learn about Leonardo’s interest in gadgets. Use your imagination to sketch a gadget and invent a useful machine. Take a quiz to see if you can identify Leonardo’s machines from his sketches.
  • Da Vinci – The Scientist – Learn about his curiosities.

Other activities include: Find out how to do “mirror writing” and generate a hypothesis about da Vinci’s reasons for writing backwards. And make sure you check out the Teaching Tips.

This is an engaging online presentation that demonstrates how Leonardo da Vinci creatively applied the scientific method in every aspect of life.

Pond Scum Science

April 9th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, April 9, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Ron’s Pond Scum

(www.silkentent.com/gus1911/RonPond.htm)

Age Range: 8-18 (Grades 3-12, with parental supervision)

 

This website provides a virtual exploration of the critters living in pond scum.

When you get to the site, simply click on the links in the text to see remarkable photographs and learn about:

  • protozoan
  • paramecium
  • actinopods
  • vorticella
  • anchor worms
  • fly larvae, amoeba
  • water mites
  • algae
  • and other single-celled and multi-celled oddities

All of this comes to you courtesy of a retired Computer Systems Analyst named Ron DeAngelis. Several years ago, he set up an outdoor fish pond and became interested in micro pond life. He bought a good microscope and when he discovered he could take excellent pictures with a digital camera, “Ron’s Pond Scum” was born!

Ron gets emails from students all over the world, as well as from frustrated parents who confide that without Ron’s website, their child would never have finished his or her science project.

Ron’s Pond Scum is a terrific way to explore the life teeming in pond water without getting wet. It’s a great supplement to any science curriculum. 

Make Asteroids Collide with Earth!

April 2nd, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, April 2, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Impact Earth!

(www.purdue.edu/impactearth/)

Age Range: 10 and up (Grades 5 and up approximately, with parental supervision)

 

This is so cool! Purdue University sponsors this free, web-based computer program that lets you calculate the damage an asteroid would cause if it collided with Earth.

You can customize the size, density, and speed of the incoming object, determine where it will land, and watch an animation of the asteroid’s crash course with our planet. Then find out the catastrophic results of your efforts (if any).

When you get to the site, wait for the program to load. (While you’re waiting, use the menu to learn about “Famous Craters,” read documentation about this project, and check out a short glossary of terms used in the program.) Then, simply enter the parameters including: 

  • Projectile Diameter
  • Projectile Density
  • Angle of Impact
  • Velocity
  • Target (Water, Sedimentary Rock, or Crystalline Rock)
  • Distance from Impact

Finally, click on “Calculate Impact” to start the animation and see the results. If you’re not sure what to input, there are drop-down lists with suggestions you can use. Once you get the hang of it, it’s fascinating to try different scenarios to see if humanity survives your asteroid or suffers total annihilation.

The Periodic Table of Comic Books

February 26th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, February 26, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Periodic Table of Comic Books

(www.uky.edu/Projects/Chemcomics/index.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

A couple of chemists took it upon themselves to collect comic strips that mention elements from the Periodic Table and compile them on this website. The result is a “literature” tie-in to the science of chemistry and elements in particular, making them both seem less daunting and more fun.

When you get to the site you’ll see a brief introduction and a Periodic Table of Elements. Click on any element and a new page opens where you can see the comic strips where the element has been mentioned or featured.

Once you’ve checked out the comic, if you want more technical information on any particular element, visit the site called WebElements.

NOTE TO PARENTS: Comic strips may have controversial subject matter. In addition, this site contains links to other websites that we have not reviewed. As always, you should preview the content to determine suitability for your own children.

Happy Birthday President Lincoln

February 12th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, February 12, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Abraham Lincoln Research Site

(rogerjnorton.com/Lincoln2.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental supervision)

 

Although we celebrate Presidents’ Day on February 18th this year, today, February 12th, is President Abraham Lincoln’s actual birthday.

Since we focus on science today, we found some interesting tidbits on this site about Abraham Lincoln related to science that you might not have known: 

  • Abraham Lincoln is the only president to have a patent – a Lincoln-devised device for freeing ships that had run aground in shallow water.
  • Find out how an 11-year-old girl convinced Lincoln to grow a beard.
  • Did you know that two of Lincoln’s sons, Tad and Willie, kept goats as pets at the White House?
  • See photos of Lincoln’s beloved mutt, Fido.
  • Then, get out your hankies and read the touching account of Lincoln’s encounter with three orphaned kittens on the eve of the final military advance of the Civil War.
  • Dry your eyes and read all about how a turkey, intended for dinner, became a presidential pet!

Make sure you check out the rest of the site – it is just so beautifully developed, with such thorough and engaging commentary, photographs, primary sources, and wonderful anecdotes about Lincoln.

The Great Backyard Bird Count

February 5th, 2019

 

It’s Tuesday, February 5, 2019, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Backyard Bird Count

(www.audubon.org/content/about-great-backyard-bird-count)

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

Mark your calendars and get ready to participate in “The Great Backyard Bird Count” scheduled for February 15-18, 2019.

This annual event, sponsored by the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, is your opportunity to join a citizen-science project (for kids, teens, and adults) that helps scientists collect data and investigate far-reaching questions about bird populations.

It only takes as little as 15 minutes on one day. You simply count the birds you see in your backyard and turn in the results. It’s free, fun, and easy – and it helps the scientists to help the birds.

To learn how to participate go to The Great Backyard Birdcount website. Use the menu to register, learn about birds, and view the bird photo gallery.


Now, if this sparks your family’s interest in birds, you are sure to enjoy this website: WhatBird.com. Use a tool that helps you to identify a bird by what it looks like. You simply enter its attributes such as habitat, size, color, body shape, bill shape, etc., to drill down results, choosing as many options as you can along the way.

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