Archive for the ‘science’ category

Track Santa’s Sleigh!

December 5th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, December 5, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

NORAD Tracks Santa

(www.noradsanta.org/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Track Santa’s sleigh on Christmas Eve! Those wacky scientists at North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) use four high-tech systems to track Santa – radar, satellites, Santa Cams and jet fighter aircraft.

Not only that, they provide lots of pre-Christmas Eve activities just for kids including: 

  • Visit Santa’s Kids’ Countdown Village – Visit this website each day in December to receive updates from the North Pole and discover surprises (activities like word searches and crossword puzzles).
  • Watch Holiday Cheer Videos – Watch videos created by students to celebrate Santa. And on December 24th visit NORAD’s site to see the video feed from Santa Cams positioned around the world.
  • Track Santa with Your Mobile Phone – On December 24th use “Google Maps for Mobile” to track Santa’s location worldwide.
  • Track Santa Through Google Earth – On Christmas Eve head to the NORAD site to track Santa’s flight in Google Earth.
  • About Santa – Watch a video of Santa reciting, The Night Before Christmas. Read FAQs about Santa and NORAD. Find out how many cookies Santa eats on Christmas Eve.
  • About NORAD – Find out why NORAD tracks Santa and how they do it!

Wishing you a very merry Christmas, a joyful holiday season, and a Happy New Year!

Take a Journey to a Black Hole!

November 28th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, November 28, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

HubbleSite: Black Holes – Gravity’s Relentless Pull

(hubblesite.org/explore_astronomy/black_holes/)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 3 and up approximately; children with parental supervision)

 

The Space Telescope Science Institute offers this terrific website that allows you to engage in a multi-media, in-depth inquiry into the astronomy and physics of black holes through animations and interactive experiments. Explore light, gravity, and the scale of our universe.

When you get to the site, watch a brief, narrated animation that provides information on how black holes are formed. Then, begin your virtual journey to a black hole through three interactive modules that include: 

  • Finding the Invisible – Locate and identify various objects in the universe such as a binary star, the Cygnus galaxy, the Andromeda spiral galaxy, the sun, the moon, the Milky Way, a quasar, a red giant, Saturn, the crab nebula and more. As each object comes into view, read more about it on the sidebar and by clicking on the “Learn More” button.
  • The Voyage – Learn about scales and distances by taking a virtual trip to a black hole. Find out about the objects you pass on your trip through space. Measure your speed and distance traveled. Get explanations of the concepts of lightspeed and lightyear. When you reach your destination, mouse over the black hole to learn about its features.
  • Up Close and Personal – Orbit a black hole and learn all about it. Try some interactive experiments and answer related questions.

You can also explore the “Black Hole Encyclopedia” and “Glossary” to learn even more.

Ask A Biologist

November 21st, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, November 21, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Ask A Biologist

(askabiologist.asu.edu/home)

Age Range: 4-18 (Grades PreK-12, with parental supervision)

 

This site, from the School of Life Sciences of Arizona State University, is a “biology learning resource tool for students, teachers, parents, and life-long learners.”

When you get to the site, start at the right side bar where you’ll see a question and a link to the answer. Then you can link to more top questions like: 

  • Does brain size relate to intelligence?
  • How does eye color get passed from parents to children?
  • Is a Macadamia nut really a seed, or a nut?

You can also ask your own question using the “Ask a Question” link at the top. (Be sure to read the guidelines before you submit a question.)

In the Teacher Toolbox, you can search a topic by category, grade level or activity type. Also check out: 

  • Activities – Experiments, puzzles and coloring pages
  • Stories – Read or listen to one of the podcast shows.
  • Images – Look at things up close and guess what they are.
  • Links – Will help you find what you need on the Internet

There is extensive information here so bookmark this site to return often to get your biology questions answered.

Forensic Science Interactive Games!

November 14th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, November 14, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

CSI: Forensic Science Interactive Games

(forensics.rice.edu/)

Age Range: 11 and up (Grades 5 through adult; children with parental supervision)

 

This website from Rice University in conjunction with CBS, the National Science Foundation and the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, and others, offers free interactive forensic science investigations based on the CSI television series.

You become a CSI investigator, analyze the forensic evidence, and test your investigative and problem-solving skills to crack the case! If you aren’t familiar with CSI (Crime Scene Investigation), you should know that the object of each activity is to investigate a crime scene that involves a death and/or homicide. Parents, AS ALWAYS, should preview the site to determine suitability of content.

When you get to the site, find five CSI cases:

  • Case One: Rookie Training (Beginner Level) – Visit online labs to collect information and tools about forensic biology, toxicology, firearms and toolmarks, the medical examiner, and CSI ethics.
  • Case Two: Canine Caper (Intermediate Level) – Interview suspects, visit the crime scene and labs, take photographs and measurements, collect and analyze evidence and data.
  • Case Three: Burning Star (Advanced level)
  • Case Four: Bitter Pill (Advanced level)
  • Case Five: Fatal Interactions (Advanced level)

The last three cases are more complicated and require some time to collect evidence and analyze it using a variety of tools and resources. Challenging, fascinating and informative! If you have any difficulty with navigation, click on “WalkThrough” in the upper right corner of the screen for each individual case, to get directions on how to proceed.

You are given the opportunity to register (free). It allows you to save your place so that you can continue wherever you left off after a session. One game can take more than an hour to master.

Once you’ve explored the “Web Adventures,” use the horizontal menu again and click on “For Educators” to access: 

  • Educator’s Guide – Get free, downloadable activities “to see how bone length can be used to calculate height, create your own bill for forensic testing, or solve forensic logic problems – and more!”
  • Family Guide – The description on the website says, “Looking for some fun forensic activities to do at home? From blood spatter analysis to DNA extractions, we’ve got fun (yet safe) activities for all ages. Check it out!”
  • Online Activities – Learn about entomology, handwriting analysis, and test your memory and power of observation.
  • Cool Links – Get links to websites on forensic science, toxicology, pathology, fingerprints, and other forensic games.

This site requires a lot of time to fully explore, so bookmark it to return.

Historic Timeline of the Discovery of Planets

October 31st, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, October 31, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

PlanetQuest Timeline

(exoplanets.nasa.gov/resources/1048/)

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 3 – adult; children with parental supervision)

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory offers a multi-media historic timeline of the discovery of planets in our solar system and in others.

Turn on your speakers to hear the narration as you watch the video slide show. There’s something for everyone here – a description simply doesn’t do it justice.

Genetics for Kids!

October 10th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, October 10, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Mendel for Kids

(web.pdx.edu/~cruzan/Kid‘s%20Mendel%20Web/)

Age Range: 8-12 (Grades 2-7 approximately, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers “A Kid’s Guide to Gregor Mendel, the Father of Genetics.”  

Mendel was a monk who used garden peas to conduct heredity experiments upon which modern genetics were founded. This site serves as a starting place for introducing the concept of genetics to kids. It has some good basic information. When you enter the site you’ll see a menu that includes: 

  • The Life of Gregor Mendel – Read a brief biography about Mendel’s life and work.
  • Pollination Station – This simple interactive allows kids to virtually cross-breed sets of plants and see the results.
  • Original Paper & Kid Translation – Read Mendel’s original notes on plant hybridization (in English or German), and then click on a link that explains the notes so kids can more easily understand them.

NOTE: Under ‘links’, we found only 2 are working: MendelWeb and Genetics Society of America.

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