Archive for the ‘nature’ category

Fractals & Patterns In Nature

March 12th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, March 12, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Dance of Chance

(argento.bu.edu/museum/)

Age Range: 8/15 (Grades 3-9, with parental supervision)

 

The Center for Polymer Studies collaborated with the Boston Museum of Science to develop this online exhibit of experiments and examples that helps students explore the exciting world of patterns in nature – especially fractals.

When you get to the site, you’ll see an introduction and a menu of exhibits that include: 

  • Music of the Heart – Did you know that your electrocardiogram can be used to produce a unique melody? Listen to the “heartsongs” here and discover how they were recorded.
  • Metal Deposition – Watch a movie of copper sulfate electrodeposition viewed through a microscope. Find out what patterns zinc sulfate has in common with a snowflake.
  • Termites – Find out what their foraging trails can tell you about patterns in math including branches and fractals.

These are brief exhibits. If you want to learn more be sure to click on the links for “Fractals in Science Image Galleries” and “Exploring Patterns in Nature Curriculum Guides.” You’ll find free hands-on activities and laboratory experiments in a free complete curriculum that “encourage students to explore how fundamentally random microscopic events can give rise to fractal macroscopic patterns in nature.” Use it online or print it out to use offline an enjoy learning about topics such as: 

  • Fractals
  • Dimensions & Logarithms
  • Randomness
  • Pascal’s Triangle
  • Measuring Average Distances
  • Models of Fractal Growth
  • Biological Branching Patterns
  • Diffusion
  • Percolation in Nature
  • And much more!

Fibonacci Numbers & More!

January 29th, 2018

 

It’s Monday, January 29, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Fibonacci Numbers and the Golden Section

(www.maths.surrey.ac.uk/hosted-sites/R.Knott/Fibonacci/fib.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 4-12 approximately, with parental supervision)

 

In the 13th century, Leonardo Fibonacci discovered a progression of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers: 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, etc. These numbers recur in patterns in nature – such as in the pine cone and in seashell patterns. The creator of this site, Dr. Ron Knott, provides many activities for discovering Fibonacci numbers along with clear explanations and excellent diagrams and pictures.


When you get to the site, you’ll see a lot of text. Don’t let that deter you. It clearly explains the easiest way to explore the contents. 

Our suggestion is to start by listening to Dr. Knott’s interview on BBC radio about Fibonacci Numbers (45 minutes). You can listen online or download the podcast. It is a useful general introduction to Fibonacci Numbers and the Golden Section (which you’ll learn more about at the website too). 

After listening to the interview, head over to the introductory page that reveals Fibonacci numbers in nature. It includes fun activities that really help students see patterns in nature. Then try the puzzles, mathematical explorations, and learn about applications of Fibonacci numbers.

The site also provides excellent explanations and activities about the Golden Section and Golden String that also appear in nature. The content is geared for about 5th grade and up – but younger children may enjoy seeing how math exists in nature too. It’s a great way to show kids that math is all around us!

Photo “Ark” of Earth’s Biodiversity

January 16th, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, January 16, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Wildscreen Arkive

(www.arkive.org/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Gather the family around the computer for this free photographic “Ark-ive” of wildlife imagery that promotes understanding and appreciation of the world’s biodiversity and conservation of the world’s threatened species.

Sponsored by Wildscreen, a non-profit organization, this site is more than just a beautiful photo gallery of the earth’s many plants and animals; it is a virtual encyclopedia of the world’s endangered species!

Get up close and personal with nature as you flip through the amazing high resolution images of species including: 

  • Mammals
  • Birds
  • Reptiles
  • Fish
  • and more

Click on a category, and a new page opens to a menu of flora or fauna represented. For example, click on “Reptiles” and a new page opens where you can learn more about Galapagos marine iguana, and many more!

View incredible photographs, videos, and read interesting fact sheets to learn information such as: 

  • Biology
  • Range
  • Habitat
  • Threats
  • Conservation

There are also external links within each page to lead you to the organizations or societies helping a given species.

Snowflake Science

January 2nd, 2018

 

It’s Tuesday, January 2, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Snowflake Science

(www.newscientist.com/gallery/dn16170-snowflakes)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Gather the kids ’round the computer screen and head over to this website where you can explore a gallery of snowflake photos that “were taken by Kenneth Libbrecht of CalTech, using a specially-designed snowflake photomicroscope.”

See pictures of real snow crystals that fell to earth in northern Ontario, Alaska, Vermont, the Michigan Upper Peninsula, and the Sierra Nevada mountains of California.

Not only can you see some truly amazing images (from the simplest snowflake form to the most complex), the captions next to the pictures explain the science behind how these snowflakes were formed by Mother Nature.

When you get to the site you’ll see the first image in the series. Just click on the “next” button to view all 13 pages.

NOTE: When you’re through exploring the snowflake gallery, you can click on the “NewScientist” logo at the top of the screen. That will take you to the homepage of NewScientist.com. This is the companion website to “New Scientist Magazine” that was first published in 1956. The site serves as an archive of thousands of free articles on scientific research and development. WARNING: We did NOT review any content except the Snowflake Gallery – so parents AS ALWAYS should review the site to determine suitability of content.

Virtual Tours – Hunterdon County, NJ

December 15th, 2017

 

It’s Friday, December 15, 2017, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Virtual Tours – Hunterdon County, NJ

(www.co.hunterdon.nj.us/depts/parks/virtualtours.htm)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

New Jersey became the third state on December 18, 1787. Visit one of its counties with these virtual tours.

Hunterdon County is located in western New Jersey and home to many trails and county parks. To begin taking your tours, either use the drop-down menu at the top of the page or select one of the images below the introduction. Locations include: 

  • County Arboretum
  • Charlestown Reservation
  • Cold Brook Reserve
  • Columbia Trail
  • Hoffman Park
  • Jugtown Mountain
  • Round Mountain
  • Town Hill Preserve
  • Tettertown Preserve
  • Wescott Nature Preserve

And many more locations. Tours include images of the location, wildlife, and other points of interest. Each image is accompanied by a textural description.

Select the “Home” link in the upper left to learn more about the county. Select the “Facts & Figures” link then “Fun Facts About Hunterdon” to explore its history and more.

Amazing Science Videos

November 7th, 2017

 

It’s Tuesday, November 7, 2017, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Vega Science Trust

(www.vega.org.uk/video/index.html)

Age Range: 11 and up (Grades 6 and up; children with parental supervision)

 

This archived website offers free videos on science, technology, engineering and mathematics that provide a fundamental understanding of the principles of nature and the physical world.

When you get to the site you’ll see the video icon menu containing an archive of scientific videos which can all be viewed from this non-profit website. The videos cover a broad range of topics such as: 

  • Interviews with Scientists – Including Nobel prize-winners in the fields of physics, medicine, chemistry, and more.
  • Careers in Science – Interviews with a biochemist, ecologist, entomologist, food scientist, cosmologist, computer engineer, quantum chemist, robotics engineer and more!
  • Issues of Concern – Scientists and politicians discuss their primary world concerns including climate change, malaria, etc.
  • Masterclass Science Videos – Scientists share their personal views on key concepts and achievements as well as their approach to the scientific method. Topics include bird flight, life in space, and states of matter.
  • The Next Big Thing – Scientists discuss antimatter, cloning, defying death, energy, artificial intelligence, safety of mobile phones, nanotechnology, and “The Theory of Everything!”
  • Educational Resources – A selection of short instructional films (for school or home study use) on wind power, electricity, transistors, nanotubes, bucky ball workshops, states of matter workshops (solids, liquids and gases) and more.

Scientists guided the development of the videos so that the content is presented in a natural and engaging way that is intellectually challenging.

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