Archive for the ‘math’ category

Pascal’s Triangle & The 12 Days of Christmas!

December 15th, 2014

 

It’s Monday, December 15, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

DIMACS: 12 Days of Christmas

 

Age Range: 5-13 (Grades K-8, with parental supervision)

 

This website, sponsored by Rutgers University, offers an interesting exploration of Pascal’s Triangle (used in algebra and probability) through the lyrics of the song, The Twelve Days of Christmas. Click here to just listen to the tune and see the printed lyrics of the song.)
When you get to the site, you’ll find the lesson plan and instructions for leading your students through this fun math exercise.

If you like working with triangles, the site offers another interesting lesson plan using The Star of David.

Students can also have fun calculating the cost of purchasing the 12 items mentioned in The Twelve Days of Christmas. Click here for the Lesson Plan.

Holiday Bonus! Watch a video of homeschool moms singing a humorous version of this Christmas carol retitled, The 14 Days of Homeschool.

Hot Math!

December 8th, 2014

 

It’s Monday, December 8, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Hotmath.com

 

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 7-11, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers free math activities and games for middle and high school students to learn graphing, factoring, and divisibility in a fun way, all online!

When you get to the site you will see the following choices:

I. HANDS ON MATH LEARNING – This area includes:
*Pre-Algebra Activities – Algebra Tiles, Acrobat Number Line, Circle Area Approximation, Data Representation, Area Decomposer, Fraction Tech Tool, and other titles
*Algebra I Activities – Exponential Functions, Exponential and Log Functions, Quadratic Equations in Factored Form, Diamond Problem Flash Cards, etc.
*Algebra II and Trigonometry Activities – Function Grapher, Conic Sections – General Form, Hyperbolas, Ellipses and more.
*Geometry Activities – Angle Sum Theorem, Exterior Angles of a Polygon, Conics, Conics – Parabola, Area of a Triangle and many more activities.
II. MATH GAMES
Click on the words “Math Games” to enter the game page. You will find the following games:
*Catch the Fly – Give Mr. Frog the x,y coordinates so he can dine!
*Number Cop – Speed through divisible numbers and try not to crash into the wrong numbers!
*Algebra vs. the Cockroaches – What axis are the cockroaches running through? Game can be played with or without sound.
*Factortris – Similar to “Tetris” but with a new dimension. You build the dimensions needed by solving the equation and place them where you want them. If you let the time run out, the game builds the piece and you will not have a choice on placement.
These online games and activities are a great way to learn math concepts at any age!

Circle Math with Paper Plates!

December 1st, 2014

 

It’s Monday, December 1, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Wholemovement.com

 

Age Range: All (All grades, children with parental supervision)

 

This is fascinating! Bradford Hansen-Smith has been folding circles and teaching people of all ages how to do it for twenty years. He states, “Mathematics is based on the geometry of drawing pictures of the circle and using parts of the circle for constructing information from these static images. The square and all other polygons are only a part of the circle, all limited to a specific number of sides. The circle has no sides, it does not have limits.”
At this website you’ll find four, free, fundamental activities with instructions on how to fold circles to make:
  • A Sphere
  • A Tetrahedron
  • An Octahedron
  • An Icosahedron

You’ll also find on the home page a fascinating animation that demonstrates how folded circles combine into a spherical pattern that Buckminster Fuller called the Vector Equilibrium.

Hansen-Smith was inspired by the work of Fuller, and now leads explorations into geometry and other forms of math by folding and joining circles. He claims that, “The circle is the most experiential, comprehensive, hands-on, educational tool we have… Every child in school should be folding as often as they draw pictures of circles, and discuss the information that is generated in the folding.”
Folding circles is accessible to anyone who can fold a circle in half, regardless of age or grade level. The main tool you’ll need are paper circles that are readily available in the form of paper plates.
By using the menu, you can read and discover more about folding circles along with information on Hansen-Smith’s workshops and products he sells in his online store.

Thanksgiving Math Games & Activities

November 24th, 2014

 

It’s Monday, November 24, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Websites:

 

See below.

 

Age Range: 7 and up (Grades 2 and up, children with parental supervision).

 

Thanksgiving is Thursday. We thought it would be fun to do a couple of fun Thanksgiving-themed math activities
Age Range: 8 and Up (approximately)
This online interactive logic game requires the player to place everyone at the Thanksgiving dinner table according to their preferences for food and people!

DreamBox Learning: Thanksgiving Dinner Math

Age Range: 7 and up (depends on activity)
This blog provides some ideas for getting your kids to use their math skills in order to figure out what size turkey to buy, the time it will take to cook the turkey, how many forks/knives/spoons will be needed, how many pies to make, etc.

Mr. P’s Thanksgiving Cross Number Puzzle

Age Range: 10 and up (middle school and beyond)
A math teacher developed this Cross Number Puzzle requiring students to solve mathematical problems to fill in the puzzle squares. For example:
  • Cube 10, multiply by 5, add 5.
  • Calculate the interest at 2% on $10,000 for 1 year
  • What’s 3 x 16
  • Unity and its consecutive numbers
  • What’s 3 squared plus 2

Find the answers to this puzzle by clicking on “answer key” on the menu bar at the top of the page. If this is too challenging or not challenging enough, try the other free math puzzles, games, tricks and activities by selecting them from the top menu bar.

Math Using Ciphers & Secret Codes!

November 10th, 2014

 

It’s Monday, November 10, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

NSA/CSS: CryptoKids

 

Age Range: 9 and up (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

The National Security Agency and Central Security Service are America’s code makers and breakers for the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard. This website contains free games, puzzles, codes, ciphers and activities related to cryptology to educate and inspire the next generation of “mathematicians, linguists, engineers, and analysts.”

When you get to the site you can choose to view it in Flash (multi-media with sound and animation) or Text (printed copy only). Use the menu to explore:

*Codes & Ciphers – Learn the definition and history of codes and cipher. Use your math and logic skills to make your own cipher and learn how to break/decode ciphers.
*Games & Activities – Use math and logic to solve challenging brainteasers. Crack cryptograms using “substitution” or “transposition” ciphers. Make your own cipher machine from items found in your home. Use math, language, and memory skills to play some online games.
*Student Resources – Explore links to sites about the history of cryptology, see a photo gallery of cryptologists and the equipment they use. Check out the Cryptologic Museum. Read declassified top secret documents about the Korean War, Kennedy’s assassination, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and more. Learn about careers in the NSA along with high school and college programs and scholarships.

This is an engaging site that teaches, informs, and entertains while it helps students hone their math skills.

Have Fun Tracking Money

November 3rd, 2014

 

It’s Monday, November 3, 2014, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

 

Where’s George

 

Age Range: 6-18 (Grades 1-12, with parental supervision)

 

Most parents know that one of the easiest ways to get kids interested in math is through the use of money. This website offers a way to track a U.S. dollar bill to see where it’s been – what a great way to tie in social studies with math! We were required to register (free) in order to access the site.
Once you’re there, just enter the denomination, series, and serial number of any U.S. dollar bill, along with your current US zip code in the form on the homepage.

A “Bill Tracker Report” will be generated explaining where your bill has been, how far it has traveled, how long it’s been in circulation, and you can even read comments from people explaining where they got the bill before using it or passing it along to someone else.

But that’s not all! Using the “Tools/Fun” item on the menu at the top of the page, click on “Cool Links About Money.” A new page opens with links to the BEST MONEY WEBSITES where you can learn all about the history of U.S. currency, design features, and even security measures to deter counterfeiting. You’ll also find links where you can track bills from various countries in Europe, as well as currency from India, Africa, China, Japan, and New Zealand.

If you are from Canada, be sure to check out “Where’s Willy” to track Canadian currency! (By the way, for those who don’t know, “Willy” refers to Sir Wilfrid Laurier the first French Canadian Prime Minister.)

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