Visit the Pima Air & Space Museum Online

August 3rd, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Friday, August 3, 2018, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Pima Air & Space Museum Virtual Tours

(www.pimaair.org/visit/exhibits-virtual-tours)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Tour the Pima Air & Space Museum in Tucson, Arizona with today’s ClickSchooling find.

Be sure that your Flash player is up to date and enabled then select from the virtual tour image links to view items in the following collections: 

  • Main Hangar – F-4 Phantom, T33, Microjet, Bumble Bee, Huey, Beech 18, Wright Flyer, F-14, AH-1 Cobra, Learjet, Electra, A-10 Thunderbolt, Thunderflash, D-21, S3-Viking, Seasprite, Dash, Cougar, F-107, SR-71, F107, Osprey, Mariner, and more
  • Space Gallery – X-Planes, Space Capsule, Simulator, moon rock, Arizona Aviation Hall of Fame, Apollo Command Module, and more
  • 390th Memorial Museum – B-17, WWII Jeep, Berlin Exhibit, and much more
  • WWII Hangars – V-1, B-25 Mitchell, B-24, Bobcat, C-47 Skytrain, Wildcat, Commando, H4, H22, F4U Corsair, B-29 Superfortress, Oscar, and more
  • Outdoor Planes – additional aircraft can be examined using this Google tour.

In addition to these tours, hover over the “Visit” link in the upper menu, then select “Museum Aircraft” to see and learn more about the aircraft at the museum. Click the image to enlarge.


Your aviation enthusiast will definitely enjoy these tours.

You Are There History Audios

August 2nd, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Thursday, August 2, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Internet Archive: You Are There

(archive.org/details/You_Are_There_OTR)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Family members of all ages can enjoy listening to these archived broadcasts of the “You Are There” radio program, but older students may have a better level of comprehension and retention.

“You Are There” is a series of about seven dozen or so radio broadcasts which aired from 1947 to 1950, each about half an hour long. More than 70 episodes are archived. Each episode is a fictional news report “live from the scene” of an important event in history.

As the reporter conducts interviews with famous people (and not-so-famous people) and you hear realistic sound effects, you can imagine that you have been transported back in time – and history is unfolding right before your very ears.

  • Listen in as Julius Caesar, Socrates, Captain Kidd, Maximilian, Joan of Arc, John Wilkes Booth, and others meet their end.
  • Re-live the famous battle at Thermopylae, the Alamo, the defeat of the Spanish Armada, the storming of the Bastille, the battle of Gettysburg, the battle of Hastings, the fall of Troy, the defeat of Sitting Bull, and other exciting conflicts.
  • Witness the rise and fall of great leaders, the signing of pivotal documents and treaties, and important uprisings, trials, and discoveries.

Archive.org makes all of this available for free. When you reach this site, you may wish to wait a little while for the main page to load completely; a gray audio player appears near at the top of the play list of the screen. You can click on any title to play it directly from your browser.

In addition to legally and freely listening to these broadcasts online, you can also right-click on the titles to download them to your computer for listening later, then load them onto any device that plays mp3’s.

Cozy up on the couch with the family for a delightful listening adventure or listen as you travel away from home.

Books That Shaped America’s History

August 1st, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Wednesday, August 1, 2018, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Library of Congress: Books That Shaped America

(www.loc.gov/exhibits/books-that-shaped-america/overview.html)

Age Range: 10-18 (Grades 4-12, with parental supervision)

 

The Library of Congress has an exhibition called “Books That Shaped America” that highlights books that have had a historical impact on the lives of Americans through the ages.

The titles featured are by American authors and as the website explains, “Some of the titles on display have been the source of great controversy, even derision, yet they nevertheless shaped Americans’ views of their world and often the world’s view of the United States.” The Library of Congress encourages visitors to read the books exhibited to explore the breadth and depth of America’s literary tradition
 
This online exhibit presents a unique opportunity to identify books of historical importance by era. When you get to the site, you’ll see a menu of each era including: 

  • 1750 to 1800 – Find book titles such as: Experiments and Observations on Electricity by Benjamin Franklin, Common Sense by Thomas Paine, The Federalist: A Collection of Essays, and even the first American cookbook.
  • 1800 to 1850 – You’ll find Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, a book featuring papers written by Lewis & Clark about their great expedition, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. You’ll discover why these books were of great historical importance.
  • 1850 to 1900 – The titles here will most likely be much more familiar and include: The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Moby-Dick by Herman Melville, Walden by Henry David Thoreau, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and many more.
  • 1900 to 1950 – Book titles you’ll recognize include: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, Jack London’s The Call of the Wild, Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and more.
  • 1950 to 2000 – Discover Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White, The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, The Double Helix by James D. Watson, The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss, Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, etc.

Click on any era and a new page opens that explains what each book is about and why it is historically significant. Some of the explanations are thought provoking – and could stimulate lots of discussion.
 
You might want to copy the titles and use them as a guide the next time you head to the library for a good read.

Weekly ‘Bring Science Home’ Activities!

July 31st, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Tuesday, July 31, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Scientific American: Bring Science Home

(www.scientificamerican.com/section.cfm?id=bring-science-home)

Age Range: 6-12 (Grades 1-8, with parental supervision, and fun for the whole family)

 

This ad-supported site from Scientific American features a fun, new, science-related activity every Thursday “which parents and their kids ages 6-12 can do together with household items in just a half hour or less.”

Get instructions and explanations for a bunch of interesting experiments that cover a variety of scientific topics with intriguing titles such as: 

  • Does It Sink or Float? Depends on the Soap!
  • Tune Up Your Rubber Band Guitar!
  • Play a Memory Game with Your Nose!
  • And lots more!

Back on the home page, find videos under the “Type” drop-down menu to watch entertaining videos that demonstrate fun scientific experiments such as: 

  • How to Make Oobleck
  • How to Make Mini-Craters with Mini-Meteors
  • How to Make A Homemade Compass

When you’re through checking out what’s available in the “Bring Science Home” section, be sure to explore the rest of the massive Scientific American site. Click on the “Citizen Science” tabs under “Education” on the horizontal menu for volunteer research opportunities for budding scientists of all ages.

Absurd Math: Pre-Algebra From Another Dimension

July 30th, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Monday, July 30, 2018, and time for Math at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Absurd Math

(www.learningwave.com/abmath/index.html)

Age Range: 10-15 (Grades 6-10, with parental supervision)

 

This website offers a free series of 4 interactive, pre-algebra level problem-solving games that will test your student’s math skills in a fun and challenging way.

As the player, you proceed on missions in a strange world, finding clues that are hidden on the pages along the way. You use the information you find to calculate answers in order to proceed to the next level. Handy clues are provided along with an interactive calculator. Here is a little advice to help you navigate the games: Each page looks impossible until you discover enough clues. For example, in the first game called “Nomean City” you’ll notice that on the first page you need an “authorization code”. If you look closely at everything on the page, you will see a note that says “authorization code is area times level” and then farther up on the page you see “Area 46” and “Level -3”; so you just multiply the two numbers and enter the answer where indicated.

Then, you get to the next page. Same degree of challenge again: looks impossible, and then suddenly it’s easy. Often you have to move the mouse all around the page, and even scroll down, while looking for the cursor to turn into a “hand” shape, indicating something you can click on for more clues. Sometimes you have to backtrack to other areas. Click on everything and read everything closely. Every page looks like a dead end, but the only actual dead end is the final page from which you print out your hard-earned certificate of completion. FYI: The games start with a fake message that says “Intruder Alert!” We clicked around and realized that it is actually just the first page of the game.

The games include: 

  • Nomean City – A powerful being has been captured by a cult of pollution makers and you must help save this creature and the mathematical knowledge it holds.
  • Dr. Plenobious – Dr. Plenobius is an evil scientist. Print out his entrance exam to the Airtight College. Identify flesh-eating bacteria and try to save one of his lab rabbits.
  • The 7th Floor – The Hotel Unknown’s 7th floor holds both mystery and danger. Find out who lives on the floor, and deal with the house detective.
  • Airtight College – Your quest is to save the alien creature, as you search the offices of the Department of Diabolics.

By the way, if you need help, you can email the website’s staff for assistance. Teachers and parents may email to request the answer keys.

Again, these games are free. They are used as an enticement to subscribe to the Middleschool Mathematics program offered for a fee at the site but no purchase is necessary to play the games.

Architecture as Art

July 28th, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Saturday, July 28, 2018, and time for Art at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

The Great Buildings Collection

(www.greatbuildings.com/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

At this website you can experience art through architecture. See photographs, 3-D models, and architectural drawings of some of the most interesting and beautiful buildings in the worldRead about their history, the architectural style employed in their design, and read about the architects who designed them.


When you get to the site, after reading the introduction, use the menu at the top of the screen to open a subsection. You’ll find that over 1,000 buildings have been categorized for ease of search by: 

  • building name
  • building type (castle, cathedral, hotel, or house, etc.)
  • architect (read their biographies)
  • architectural style (Neolithic, gothic, Islamic, Japanese, Victorian, etc.)
  • construction type (brick, geodesic, glass, etc.)
  • place where the building exists (Rome, Paris, USA, etc.)
  • There is even a building timeline (located in tiny print below the main menu on the home page) – so you can pick a date or time period and explore the buildings of that era.

You will also find references to books for further study as well as links to other sites about architecture.

11 Colorado Virtual Field Trips

July 27th, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Friday, July 27, 2018, and time for a Virtual Field Trip at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

University of Northern Colorado: Virtual Field Trips

(www.unco.edu/hewit/doing-history/virtual-field-trips/)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Take eleven different virtual tours through Colorado history and historical locations with this page on the larger University of Northern Colorado Doing History, Keeping the Past website.

These tours include: 

  • Colorado Indians
  • Georgetown’s Historic Houses
  • Georgetown’s Historic Stores
  • An 1860’s Farm
  • An 1890’s Farm
  • Denver’s Historic Larimer Square
  • Denver’s Historic Lower Downtown
  • Denver’s Historic 17th Street
  • Denver’s Historic Civic Center

Each tour consists of images of the locations and interesting text providing a brief description, history, and more information.

Explore Colorado State History

July 26th, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Thursday, July 26, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

UNCO – Doing History, Keeping the Past

(www.unco.edu/hewit/doing-history/)

Age Range: 8-13 (Grades 3-8, with parental supervision)

 

Discover the history of Colorado with this website from the University of Northern Colorado.

When arriving at today’s link use the menu under the header to begin exploring: 

  • Indians
  • Trappers & Traders
  • Miners
  • Farmers & Ranchers
  • Cities
  • 20th Century Colorado
  • Virtual Field Trips

Each topic is further broken down into sub-sections focusing on the people, places, lifestyles, occupations and more. Each section provides textural information along with images and relevant quotes.  

A nice feature of these units is there is a downloadable PDF available of the section that you can take along with you when you are offline. From the “Home” page, select the “Teacher Resources” link under the welcome section to locate downloadable Word documents of lesson plans and activities as well as other online resources.

This site would make a good addition to your Colorado state studies.

Reading, Writing, Spelling, & Grammar Games!

July 25th, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Wednesday, July 25, 2018, and time for Language Arts at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Skillswise

(www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/english)

Age Range: 11-18 (Grades 5-12, with parental preview and supervision)

 

This BBC website offers free interactive games that teach practical literacy skills.

Although designed for adults, students (about 11 and up) can use this resource as well. Instead of playing young “kiddie games” that are sometimes too elementary, slow-moving, or annoyingly “cutesy,” students can practice basic reading, writing, grammar and spelling with games that use more sophisticated vocabulary and topics (although some of the games are still very simple with young-ish animations).

When you get to the site you’ll see a menu of English skills including:

  • Reading – Learn phonics, letter and word recognition, reading comprehension and more.
  • Writing – This section covers handwriting, typing, filling in a form, writing a paragraph or letter, and proofreading.
  • Spelling – Discover root words, prefixes and suffixes, letter patterns, and more.
  • Word Grammar – Find out about verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns.
  • Sentence Grammar – Practice sentence structure, tenses, and punctuation.

Click on any topic and a new page opens. Watch a short video, play some games to reinforce learning, and take some short quizzes.
 
IMPORTANT: In all of the games we sampled for this review, we didn’t find any objectionable content. However, we did not sample everything. Because Skillswise was designed for adults, PARENTS SHOULD PREVIEW AND SUPERVISE ALL USE.

Ice Cream Science

July 24th, 2018 by ClickSchooling No comments »

 

It’s Tuesday, July 24, 2018, and time for Science at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

Ice Cream Science

(www.thoughtco.com/how-to-make-ice-cream-in-a-bag-602195)

Age Range: All (All grades; children with parental supervision)

 

Summer and ice cream go hand-in-hand. We thought it might be fun to learn science through ice cream!

At this website you will find instructions for a science experiment for making ice cream in a baggie. In addition to the recipe, learn the science involved in making ice cream including: What is the freezing point depression? And why do we add salt to the ice?

Want more ice cream science? You’ll get it from Professor Goff, Ph.D. with the Department of Food Science at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. His site offers the history of ice cream, the composition of ice cream, the structure of ice cream with emulsions and foams, and more!

Also, Get the Scoop on Baking Ice Cream! Did you know you can bake ice cream? Using egg whites as an insulator helps. Find out all about it at this website!

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