The CIA for Kids!

November 29th, 2018 by ClickSchooling Leave a reply »

 

It’s Thursday, November 29, 2018, and time for Social Sciences at ClickSchooling!

 

Recommended Website:

CIA for Kids

(www.cia.gov/kids-page)

Age Range: 5-18 (Grades K-12, with parental supervision)

 

When you think about the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency), “kids” is probably not the first word that comes to mind. So, you may be surprised to see what they offer for children on their “Kids’Zone” page.

Find out about the history of the CIA and what they do including how they use dogs and pigeons to gather intelligence. You can also try your hand at breaking a secret code!

When you get to the site you will see a menu on the right side of your screen that includes: 

  • K-5th Grade – Click on this link and a new page opens with a brief introduction to the CIA for younger elementary grade students. Look for the menu on the left side of the screen that includes an opportunity to learn all about the CIA Seal, find out about the CIA K-9 Corp (kids will love reading the personal stories of 23 different “spy” dogs), and get a bird’s eye view of the CIA (includes info about how carrier pigeons help the CIA).
  • 6th-12th Grade Homepage – Click on this link to access info designed for older students including: 
    • Who We Are & What We Do – Includes a more in-depth look at the mission, structure, and the operations of the CIA.
    • Getting a Job at the CIA – Explains the qualifications one must have to work for the CIA.
    • Operation History – When you click this, don’t miss “one of the most secret museums in the world” to take a virtual tour of the CIA museum and its artifacts. More advanced students might like to read the “History of American Intelligence” and “The History of the CIA” – in-depth looks at the history of the CIA from the Revolutionary War through WWII. Of particular interest for older students are the spy biographies which can be accessed by clicking “The CIA Hall of Fame.” Here you will find several U.S. presidents (including George Washington, Herbert Hoover, and George Bush), Nathan Hale, Harriet Tubman, and even a heroic spy who, with several names and only one leg, was the only female ever to earn the Distinguished Service Cross, one of the highest honors issued by the U.S. military.

Once you’ve checked out the grade-specific sections, have some fun by clicking on “Games” on the menu. Junior spies of every age, will have fun with a CIA puzzle, word find, and trying to decipher a secret code.

As always, parents should preview this material to determine if the content is suitable for their own children.

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